What you should know about toilets

Toilets account for almost 30% of residential indoor water use in the United States.

Toilets are also a major source of wasted water due to leaks and inefficiency. In a home that was built prior to 1993 it is most likely that the toilet uses 3.5 gallons or more for every single flush (in Dekalb County alone, approx. 165,000 homes were built prior to 1993 – there are approx. 1 Mio. Homes in the Greater Atlanta area that still have old, inefficient toilets in use). Experts say that the minimum needed to meet the basic human needs of drinking, cooking and hygiene is five gallons of clean water per person per day. It’s far from enough to ensure health and well-being-just enough to get by. Do we really need to flush down that much each time we go “Number One”?

In the beginning of modern toilets there was the seven-gallon flushing porcelain lavatory. Then there was the low-flush toilet. And by the time you’d flushed several times the bowl was “clear” and you had flushed more water than you did with the faithful lavatory.

Then there was the new and improved low-flush toilet, which was better but still not what always got the job done. And finally, the High-Efficiency toilet arrived; you now have your choice of flushing as little as .8 gallons with dual flush toilets. The best part is that they really work!

What Are High-Efficiency Toilets?

Under federal law, toilets must not exceed 1.6 gallons per flush (gpf). High-efficiency toilets (HETs) go beyond the standard and use less than 1.3 gpf. The WaterSense label will be used on HETs that are certified by independent laboratory testing to meet rigorous criteria for both performance and efficiency. Only HETs that complete the third-party certification process can earn the WaterSense label.

 Do High Efficiency Toilets Work?

Everyone is concerned about the performance of low-flow toilets. Do they clear the bowl and leave it clean? Do they stop up frequently? Unlike the first 1.6 gallon / flush toilets, WaterSense HETs combine high efficiency with high performance. Advances in toilet design permit WaterSense HETs to save water without loss of flushing power. In fact, many perform better than standard toilets in consumer testing. Want proof? Watch this amazing video of Eddie Wilcut, the Water Conservation Manager for the City of San Antonio, flushing a Russet potato down a Caroma toilet with the full flush (1.6 gallon) AND half flush (0.8 gallon), which is meant for liquid waste.

How Much Water and Money Do HETs Save?

High efficiency toilets save you money by reducing your water and wastewater costs. Over the course of a lifetime, an average person flushes the toilet nearly 140,000 times. If you install a WaterSense HET, you can save 4,000 gallons per year and your children can each save about a third of a million gallons during their lifetime. If a family of four replaces one 3.5 gpf toilet made between 1980 and 1994 with a WaterSense toilet, they can save $2,000 over the lifetime of the toilet. If the toilet being replaced was made before 1980, it uses 5 gallons per flush so the savings will be much greater. If you’d like to calculate how much water you can save try the water savings calculator on www.ecotransitions.com.

With these savings, new high-efficiency toilets can pay for themselves in only a few years. Even better, many local utilities offer substantial rebates for replacing old toilets with HETs. Detailed information on the rebates available in Georgia can be found here Rebates in Georgia

What are Dual Flush toilets?

Dual flush toilets offer a patented dual flush technology consisting of a 0.8 Gal flush for liquid waste and a 1.6 Gal flush for solids. They can save up to 40% (approx. 4600 gallons) compared to today’s standard 1.6-gallon single flush toilets. On an average of 4/1 uses a day,  Dual Flush toilets have the lowest water consumption of all – 0.96 Gallons per flush. Caroma, an Australian manufacturer that invented the Dual Flush technology manufactures award winning toilets that are both user friendly and, with a full 3.5″ trap way, virtually blockage-free!  Wouldn’t that be nice to be able to finally kiss the plunger good bye? Beware of some products reducing the amount of water flushed to use with your existing toilet. Existing bowls are not designed to perform with reduced amounts of water, so the likelihood of clogging your toilet while you are trying to flush paper and solid waste increases drastically.

Select a WaterSense Labeled High-Efficiency Toilet!look for watersense label

Whether you are remodeling a bathroom, beginning construction of a new house, or just want to replace an old, leaky toilet, a WaterSense labeled HET is your best bet. Look for the WaterSense label on any toilet you buy. If every home in the United States replaced just one old toilet with a new HET, we would save almost one trillion (spelled with a T)

gallons of water per year, equal to more than two weeks of the water flowing over Niagara Falls!

Note that some manufacturers offer high-efficiency and ordinary models with very similar names, so be sure and look for the WaterSense label. A list of WaterSense labeled High-Efficiency Toilets can be found here List of WaterSense labeled HET’s published by the EPA.

Where can I find a HET?

To find WaterSense partners and resources in your area, please follow the link and click on your state below or choose from the list that follows. EPA – Where you live

For a watersavings calculator and more information on Dual Flush toilets please visit www.ecotransitions.com.

WaterSense Partners helped save 277 million gallons of water in 2007

Venezuela running out of toilet paper

Source http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/05/16/venezuela-toilet-paper-chavez/2165405/

 

Village of Oak Park, IL – Toilet Rebate Application

http://www.oak-park.us/public/pdfs/forms/housing/Toilet%20Rebate%20Application.pdf

Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels | Green Lodging News

Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels | Green Lodging News.

Source: Green Lodging News

Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels

 

 

5/6/2009

 

HILLSBORO, ORE.—Drury Hotels, a 100 percent family owned and operated mid-scale hotel company, has chosen Caroma, a leader in dual flush toilets, to supply water-saving toilets to seven hotels in the Drury chain, including the Drury Inn and Suites, Pear Tree Inn, and the Drury Plaza. This includes three retrofit projects (one in 2007 and two completed in early 2009) to replace older, higher water usage toilets and four new constructions (one in 2008 and 2009 and two in 2010).

Caroma’s first installation with Drury Hotels in 2007 was part of San Antonio Water System’s commercial toilet retrofit program at the Pear Tree Inn, San Antonio, Texas. As a result of high efficiency dual flush toilets and low flow showerheads being installed, the water consumption reduced by an average of 50 percent from 2006 to 2009 for the same three-month period. The impressive results in water savings and performance are now being experienced in other Drury Hotels in San Antonio as well as Flagstaff, Ariz., and in hotels opening during 2009 and 2010 in Phoenix, Wichita, Kan., and San Antonio.

Caroma was chosen as the dual flush toilet provider to help maximize water savings in the bathrooms. The Sydney Smart range was installed during two retrofit projects in early 2009. The Sydney Smart features a 1.28 gallon full flush button for solid waste and 0.8 gallon half flush option for liquid and paper waste, averaging just 0.9 gallons per flush. This saves nearly 44 percent more water compared to the nationally-mandated 1.6 gallon toilet. Assuming an average of 125 rooms with a 70 percent occupancy rate and eight flushes per room, one Drury hotel can save more than 664,000 gallons of water annually compared to a 3.5 gallon toilet and 178,000 gallons compared to a single flush 1.6 gallon toilet. The Sydney range installed in two earlier hotel projects use 1.6 gallons per flush for solid waste and 0.8 gallons per flush for liquid and paper waste, averaging only 0.96 gallons per flush based on a 1:4 full/half flush ratio.

Water Expenses Reduced

“Our focus at Drury Hotels is ensuring that our guests receive quality and consistency at a good value,” says Gregg Mrzlak, mechanical project manager from Drury Southwest, Inc. “We are also very aware of the drought conditions throughout the Southwest, and by using Caroma water-conserving toilets, we are able to save considerable water each year and reduce our water costs. A great added benefit by using Caroma is a reduction in maintenance due to blockages being eliminated. We have been very pleased with the dual flush toilets and will be using them in future retrofits and new installations where possible.”

“The Caroma dual flush toilets have been a great addition to our hotels because they reduce hotel water costs considerably each year and reduce the burden on San Antonio’s water systems,” says Danielle Poyner, LEED AP for Drury Southwest, Inc. “In addition to these benefits, the toilets have also contributed to Drury Hotels earning LEED Certification at the Drury Inn & Suites in Flagstaff and for hotels seeking LEED certification that will be opening soon, including Drury Inn & Suites La Cantera in San Antonio, Texas, Drury Inn & Suites in Phoenix, and Drury Plaza in Wichita, Kan.”

“In addition to the substantial water savings experienced at the Pear Tree Inn, we have reduced the number of clogs from three to five per week prior to Caroma toilets being installed to zero clogs in more than two years,” explains Aaron Francisco, property manager at Pear Tree Inn, San Antonio. “Our customers like the fact that we are helping conserve water, but also that the toilets look very modern. We didn’t have to sacrifice style for water conservation.”

Go to Caroma.

pottygirl’s 2012 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

4,329 films were submitted to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. This blog had 19,000 views in 2012. If each view were a film, this blog would power 4 Film Festivals

Click here to see the complete report.

Happy holidays from someone using enviro

Happy holidays from someone using environmental friendliness as an excuse for being too cheap and lazy to send a real card http://some.ly/aEUebD

Springfield City Utilities offers rebate program to help with high bills during drought

Springfield City Utilities offers rebate program to help with high bills during drought.

Plunger or Brush?

During my very first visit to the US (during my honeymoon, to be precise) I had my very first, very embarrassing experience with a plunger. After all, it happened at my mother-in-law’s house. As it happened again at a hotel in Las Vegas a few years later, I still didn’t understand why I clog a toilet in the US, but never have before in Germany.

I moved to the US many years later and bought an older home. As the drought in Georgia worsened in 2007, I noticed that the toilets in our home used 3.5 gallons for each flush. I started looking around in home improvement stores and was stunned that all toilets available used 1.6 gallons for each flush. As toilets with the option of using very little water for flushing No. 1 have been available in Germany  for a very long time, I could not believe I couldn’t find them here. So after much research, I finally found Caroma Dual Flush toilets and decided to spread the word and help Georgians flushing less water and money down the toilet. After I learned why Caroma toilets work so well with very little water, I realized why American toilets clog. So finally, 16 years later I realized that there was nothing wrong with me, or my diet, that I clogged a toilet on my honeymoon!

Standard US toilets clear the bowl with siphon technology, so the waste in the bowl gets pulled into the drain and out into the trap way. In order to create this siphon action, the trap way needs to be as narrow as possible, usually around 2 to 2 3/4 inches. You can see how siphon vs. washdown technology works here

Although most of the time this flushing method gets rid of the waste efficiently, there is a tendency for blockages to occur in the toilet trap way.

Australian and European designed toilets use a wash down method which “pushes” the waste down, instead of “pulling” it. This is why European toilets have a larger diameter trap way which results in less clogging.

One drawback of wash down toilets is the smaller water spot in the bowl, which can result in “skid marks” happening on occasion. So it really comes down to a matter of personal preference. If you are comfortable with getting out a plunger to unclog your toilet every now and again, then stick with an American style toilet. If you have issues with clogged toilets and don’t mind using a toilet brush every now and then an Australian or European style model may work better for you.

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