Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels | Green Lodging News

Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels | Green Lodging News.

Source: Green Lodging News

Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels

 

 

5/6/2009

 

HILLSBORO, ORE.—Drury Hotels, a 100 percent family owned and operated mid-scale hotel company, has chosen Caroma, a leader in dual flush toilets, to supply water-saving toilets to seven hotels in the Drury chain, including the Drury Inn and Suites, Pear Tree Inn, and the Drury Plaza. This includes three retrofit projects (one in 2007 and two completed in early 2009) to replace older, higher water usage toilets and four new constructions (one in 2008 and 2009 and two in 2010).

Caroma’s first installation with Drury Hotels in 2007 was part of San Antonio Water System’s commercial toilet retrofit program at the Pear Tree Inn, San Antonio, Texas. As a result of high efficiency dual flush toilets and low flow showerheads being installed, the water consumption reduced by an average of 50 percent from 2006 to 2009 for the same three-month period. The impressive results in water savings and performance are now being experienced in other Drury Hotels in San Antonio as well as Flagstaff, Ariz., and in hotels opening during 2009 and 2010 in Phoenix, Wichita, Kan., and San Antonio.

Caroma was chosen as the dual flush toilet provider to help maximize water savings in the bathrooms. The Sydney Smart range was installed during two retrofit projects in early 2009. The Sydney Smart features a 1.28 gallon full flush button for solid waste and 0.8 gallon half flush option for liquid and paper waste, averaging just 0.9 gallons per flush. This saves nearly 44 percent more water compared to the nationally-mandated 1.6 gallon toilet. Assuming an average of 125 rooms with a 70 percent occupancy rate and eight flushes per room, one Drury hotel can save more than 664,000 gallons of water annually compared to a 3.5 gallon toilet and 178,000 gallons compared to a single flush 1.6 gallon toilet. The Sydney range installed in two earlier hotel projects use 1.6 gallons per flush for solid waste and 0.8 gallons per flush for liquid and paper waste, averaging only 0.96 gallons per flush based on a 1:4 full/half flush ratio.

Water Expenses Reduced

“Our focus at Drury Hotels is ensuring that our guests receive quality and consistency at a good value,” says Gregg Mrzlak, mechanical project manager from Drury Southwest, Inc. “We are also very aware of the drought conditions throughout the Southwest, and by using Caroma water-conserving toilets, we are able to save considerable water each year and reduce our water costs. A great added benefit by using Caroma is a reduction in maintenance due to blockages being eliminated. We have been very pleased with the dual flush toilets and will be using them in future retrofits and new installations where possible.”

“The Caroma dual flush toilets have been a great addition to our hotels because they reduce hotel water costs considerably each year and reduce the burden on San Antonio’s water systems,” says Danielle Poyner, LEED AP for Drury Southwest, Inc. “In addition to these benefits, the toilets have also contributed to Drury Hotels earning LEED Certification at the Drury Inn & Suites in Flagstaff and for hotels seeking LEED certification that will be opening soon, including Drury Inn & Suites La Cantera in San Antonio, Texas, Drury Inn & Suites in Phoenix, and Drury Plaza in Wichita, Kan.”

“In addition to the substantial water savings experienced at the Pear Tree Inn, we have reduced the number of clogs from three to five per week prior to Caroma toilets being installed to zero clogs in more than two years,” explains Aaron Francisco, property manager at Pear Tree Inn, San Antonio. “Our customers like the fact that we are helping conserve water, but also that the toilets look very modern. We didn’t have to sacrifice style for water conservation.”

Go to Caroma.

Plunger or Brush?

During my very first visit to the US (during my honeymoon, to be precise) I had my very first, very embarrassing experience with a plunger. After all, it happened at my mother-in-law’s house. As it happened again at a hotel in Las Vegas a few years later, I still didn’t understand why I clog a toilet in the US, but never have before in Germany.

I moved to the US many years later and bought an older home. As the drought in Georgia worsened in 2007, I noticed that the toilets in our home used 3.5 gallons for each flush. I started looking around in home improvement stores and was stunned that all toilets available used 1.6 gallons for each flush. As toilets with the option of using very little water for flushing No. 1 have been available in Germany  for a very long time, I could not believe I couldn’t find them here. So after much research, I finally found Caroma Dual Flush toilets and decided to spread the word and help Georgians flushing less water and money down the toilet. After I learned why Caroma toilets work so well with very little water, I realized why American toilets clog. So finally, 16 years later I realized that there was nothing wrong with me, or my diet, that I clogged a toilet on my honeymoon!

Standard US toilets clear the bowl with siphon technology, so the waste in the bowl gets pulled into the drain and out into the trap way. In order to create this siphon action, the trap way needs to be as narrow as possible, usually around 2 to 2 3/4 inches. You can see how siphon vs. washdown technology works here

Although most of the time this flushing method gets rid of the waste efficiently, there is a tendency for blockages to occur in the toilet trap way.

Australian and European designed toilets use a wash down method which “pushes” the waste down, instead of “pulling” it. This is why European toilets have a larger diameter trap way which results in less clogging.

One drawback of wash down toilets is the smaller water spot in the bowl, which can result in “skid marks” happening on occasion. So it really comes down to a matter of personal preference. If you are comfortable with getting out a plunger to unclog your toilet every now and again, then stick with an American style toilet. If you have issues with clogged toilets and don’t mind using a toilet brush every now and then an Australian or European style model may work better for you.

Australians Drop Their Pants to Protest Lack of Toilets

Australian beachgoers fed up with a lack of public toilet facilities on their local beaches came up with a very literal way to show their displeasure: by bringing their own toilets to the beach. On Sunday morning the dozen protesters, each dressed in top hats…

via Australians Drop Their Pants to Protest Lack of Toilets.

Monroe, WA toilet rebate program

http://www.monroewa.gov/index.aspx?NID=450

WaterSense Toilet Program
Frequently Asked Questions

How much is the rebate?
The rebate is $75 per toilet, or the pre-tax purchase price of the toilet, whichever is less. The
rebate applies only to the cost of the toilet, not additional parts, labor or tax. You can apply for
one rebate per home. If you applied for a rebate in 2010 or 2011, you no longer qualify.

Who qualifies for the rebate?
Single family homes (house or condominium) and multifamily buildings (four or fewer units)
served by a water district or water association are eligible (no private wells). The home must be
located in Snohomish County, WA—excluding Hat Island and the following zip codes: 98077,
98241, 98251 and 98292.

Which toilets qualify for the rebate?
Any toilet with the EPA WaterSense label qualifies for a rebate. For a list of
WaterSense labeled toilets go to http://www.epa.gov/WaterSense/products/toilets.html

Who makes WaterSense toilets?
WaterSense toilets are high-efficiency toilets (HET). HETs use no more than 1.28
gallons per flush on average, or 20 percent less than the current plumbing standard.
All WaterSense labeled toilets have been rigorously tested by independent laboratories and
must reliably flush a minimum of 350 grams of solid.

Who makes WaterSense toilets and where are they sold?
All major toilet manufacturers produce WaterSense labeled models and all hardware and
bathroom supply stores carry several models.

What documentation must I provide to receive a rebate?
You must complete and sign the application form and attach a copy of the sales receipt. If the
receipt does not show the brand and model of the toilet, you must provide other
documentation, such as the WaterSense label and model number from the toilet packaging.

When must I apply?
You must submit your application within 60 days after purchasing the toilet. Applications
received beyond 60 days of the purchase will not be processed. How long does the program last?
This program is effective January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012, or until the program funds are
exhausted. Rebates are processed on a first-come, first-served basis.

How long does it take to get my rebate?
You should receive your rebate check within 4 to 6 weeks after receipt of the application.

How much water do WaterSense toilets save?
Toilets sold in Washington before 1994 use at least 3.5 gallons per flush. Since 1994, toilets are
required to use a maximum of 1.6 gallons per flush. Replacing a pre-1994 toilet will save a
typical household about 10,000 gallons of water a year. Replacing a newer toilet will save
about 1,400 gallons of water per year.

Who can I contact if I have questions?
Email Jordan Ottow at the City of Monroe—Water Quality at jottow@monroewa.gov or call
360-863-4546.

Venice, FL toilet rebate program

http://www.venicegov.com/Files/Utilities/toilet_rebate.PDF

 

St. George, UT Toilets Rebates

http://www1.wattzon.com/rebates/84790/category/toilets/75-low-flow-toilet-rebate-2/

$75 Low-flow Toilet Rebate

City of St. George Energy Services Department

Program: Energy Utility

Requirements:
Must be an eligible WaterSense model.

City of St. George Toilet Rebate Program


More Info:
Incentive Details Online
435-627-4000

“Just Don’t Flush It”

This year’s winning short films were announced Sept. 20 at the Intelligent Use of Water™ Film Competition screening in Beverly Hills, CA. The 2011 Audience Choice Award went to

“Just Don’t Flush It” by Brian McAndrew, North Bend, Oregon – check it out!