Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels | Green Lodging News

Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels | Green Lodging News.

Source: Green Lodging News

Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels

 

 

5/6/2009

 

HILLSBORO, ORE.—Drury Hotels, a 100 percent family owned and operated mid-scale hotel company, has chosen Caroma, a leader in dual flush toilets, to supply water-saving toilets to seven hotels in the Drury chain, including the Drury Inn and Suites, Pear Tree Inn, and the Drury Plaza. This includes three retrofit projects (one in 2007 and two completed in early 2009) to replace older, higher water usage toilets and four new constructions (one in 2008 and 2009 and two in 2010).

Caroma’s first installation with Drury Hotels in 2007 was part of San Antonio Water System’s commercial toilet retrofit program at the Pear Tree Inn, San Antonio, Texas. As a result of high efficiency dual flush toilets and low flow showerheads being installed, the water consumption reduced by an average of 50 percent from 2006 to 2009 for the same three-month period. The impressive results in water savings and performance are now being experienced in other Drury Hotels in San Antonio as well as Flagstaff, Ariz., and in hotels opening during 2009 and 2010 in Phoenix, Wichita, Kan., and San Antonio.

Caroma was chosen as the dual flush toilet provider to help maximize water savings in the bathrooms. The Sydney Smart range was installed during two retrofit projects in early 2009. The Sydney Smart features a 1.28 gallon full flush button for solid waste and 0.8 gallon half flush option for liquid and paper waste, averaging just 0.9 gallons per flush. This saves nearly 44 percent more water compared to the nationally-mandated 1.6 gallon toilet. Assuming an average of 125 rooms with a 70 percent occupancy rate and eight flushes per room, one Drury hotel can save more than 664,000 gallons of water annually compared to a 3.5 gallon toilet and 178,000 gallons compared to a single flush 1.6 gallon toilet. The Sydney range installed in two earlier hotel projects use 1.6 gallons per flush for solid waste and 0.8 gallons per flush for liquid and paper waste, averaging only 0.96 gallons per flush based on a 1:4 full/half flush ratio.

Water Expenses Reduced

“Our focus at Drury Hotels is ensuring that our guests receive quality and consistency at a good value,” says Gregg Mrzlak, mechanical project manager from Drury Southwest, Inc. “We are also very aware of the drought conditions throughout the Southwest, and by using Caroma water-conserving toilets, we are able to save considerable water each year and reduce our water costs. A great added benefit by using Caroma is a reduction in maintenance due to blockages being eliminated. We have been very pleased with the dual flush toilets and will be using them in future retrofits and new installations where possible.”

“The Caroma dual flush toilets have been a great addition to our hotels because they reduce hotel water costs considerably each year and reduce the burden on San Antonio’s water systems,” says Danielle Poyner, LEED AP for Drury Southwest, Inc. “In addition to these benefits, the toilets have also contributed to Drury Hotels earning LEED Certification at the Drury Inn & Suites in Flagstaff and for hotels seeking LEED certification that will be opening soon, including Drury Inn & Suites La Cantera in San Antonio, Texas, Drury Inn & Suites in Phoenix, and Drury Plaza in Wichita, Kan.”

“In addition to the substantial water savings experienced at the Pear Tree Inn, we have reduced the number of clogs from three to five per week prior to Caroma toilets being installed to zero clogs in more than two years,” explains Aaron Francisco, property manager at Pear Tree Inn, San Antonio. “Our customers like the fact that we are helping conserve water, but also that the toilets look very modern. We didn’t have to sacrifice style for water conservation.”

Go to Caroma.

Plunger or Brush?

During my very first visit to the US (during my honeymoon, to be precise) I had my very first, very embarrassing experience with a plunger. After all, it happened at my mother-in-law’s house. As it happened again at a hotel in Las Vegas a few years later, I still didn’t understand why I clog a toilet in the US, but never have before in Germany.

I moved to the US many years later and bought an older home. As the drought in Georgia worsened in 2007, I noticed that the toilets in our home used 3.5 gallons for each flush. I started looking around in home improvement stores and was stunned that all toilets available used 1.6 gallons for each flush. As toilets with the option of using very little water for flushing No. 1 have been available in Germany  for a very long time, I could not believe I couldn’t find them here. So after much research, I finally found Caroma Dual Flush toilets and decided to spread the word and help Georgians flushing less water and money down the toilet. After I learned why Caroma toilets work so well with very little water, I realized why American toilets clog. So finally, 16 years later I realized that there was nothing wrong with me, or my diet, that I clogged a toilet on my honeymoon!

Standard US toilets clear the bowl with siphon technology, so the waste in the bowl gets pulled into the drain and out into the trap way. In order to create this siphon action, the trap way needs to be as narrow as possible, usually around 2 to 2 3/4 inches. You can see how siphon vs. washdown technology works here

Although most of the time this flushing method gets rid of the waste efficiently, there is a tendency for blockages to occur in the toilet trap way.

Australian and European designed toilets use a wash down method which “pushes” the waste down, instead of “pulling” it. This is why European toilets have a larger diameter trap way which results in less clogging.

One drawback of wash down toilets is the smaller water spot in the bowl, which can result in “skid marks” happening on occasion. So it really comes down to a matter of personal preference. If you are comfortable with getting out a plunger to unclog your toilet every now and again, then stick with an American style toilet. If you have issues with clogged toilets and don’t mind using a toilet brush every now and then an Australian or European style model may work better for you.

Australians Drop Their Pants to Protest Lack of Toilets

Australian beachgoers fed up with a lack of public toilet facilities on their local beaches came up with a very literal way to show their displeasure: by bringing their own toilets to the beach. On Sunday morning the dozen protesters, each dressed in top hats…

via Australians Drop Their Pants to Protest Lack of Toilets.

Monroe, WA toilet rebate program

http://www.monroewa.gov/index.aspx?NID=450

WaterSense Toilet Program
Frequently Asked Questions

How much is the rebate?
The rebate is $75 per toilet, or the pre-tax purchase price of the toilet, whichever is less. The
rebate applies only to the cost of the toilet, not additional parts, labor or tax. You can apply for
one rebate per home. If you applied for a rebate in 2010 or 2011, you no longer qualify.

Who qualifies for the rebate?
Single family homes (house or condominium) and multifamily buildings (four or fewer units)
served by a water district or water association are eligible (no private wells). The home must be
located in Snohomish County, WA—excluding Hat Island and the following zip codes: 98077,
98241, 98251 and 98292.

Which toilets qualify for the rebate?
Any toilet with the EPA WaterSense label qualifies for a rebate. For a list of
WaterSense labeled toilets go to http://www.epa.gov/WaterSense/products/toilets.html

Who makes WaterSense toilets?
WaterSense toilets are high-efficiency toilets (HET). HETs use no more than 1.28
gallons per flush on average, or 20 percent less than the current plumbing standard.
All WaterSense labeled toilets have been rigorously tested by independent laboratories and
must reliably flush a minimum of 350 grams of solid.

Who makes WaterSense toilets and where are they sold?
All major toilet manufacturers produce WaterSense labeled models and all hardware and
bathroom supply stores carry several models.

What documentation must I provide to receive a rebate?
You must complete and sign the application form and attach a copy of the sales receipt. If the
receipt does not show the brand and model of the toilet, you must provide other
documentation, such as the WaterSense label and model number from the toilet packaging.

When must I apply?
You must submit your application within 60 days after purchasing the toilet. Applications
received beyond 60 days of the purchase will not be processed. How long does the program last?
This program is effective January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012, or until the program funds are
exhausted. Rebates are processed on a first-come, first-served basis.

How long does it take to get my rebate?
You should receive your rebate check within 4 to 6 weeks after receipt of the application.

How much water do WaterSense toilets save?
Toilets sold in Washington before 1994 use at least 3.5 gallons per flush. Since 1994, toilets are
required to use a maximum of 1.6 gallons per flush. Replacing a pre-1994 toilet will save a
typical household about 10,000 gallons of water a year. Replacing a newer toilet will save
about 1,400 gallons of water per year.

Who can I contact if I have questions?
Email Jordan Ottow at the City of Monroe—Water Quality at jottow@monroewa.gov or call
360-863-4546.

Venice, FL toilet rebate program

http://www.venicegov.com/Files/Utilities/toilet_rebate.PDF

 

St. George, UT Toilets Rebates

http://www1.wattzon.com/rebates/84790/category/toilets/75-low-flow-toilet-rebate-2/

$75 Low-flow Toilet Rebate

City of St. George Energy Services Department

Program: Energy Utility

Requirements:
Must be an eligible WaterSense model.

City of St. George Toilet Rebate Program


More Info:
Incentive Details Online
435-627-4000

“Just Don’t Flush It”

This year’s winning short films were announced Sept. 20 at the Intelligent Use of Water™ Film Competition screening in Beverly Hills, CA. The 2011 Audience Choice Award went to

“Just Don’t Flush It” by Brian McAndrew, North Bend, Oregon – check it out!

Manatee water customers eligible for $100 rebate under toilet replacement program

http://www.mymanatee.org/home/government/county-administration/news-release/toilet_rebates.html

Manatee water customers eligible for $100 rebate under toilet replacement program

 

 

MANATEE COUNTY, FL (Sept. 1, 2011) – The Southwest Florida Water Management District and Manatee County are again offering Manatee County residents a financial incentive to save water by replacing high-volume toilets with low volume models.

 

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Manatee County water customers can apply for a rebate of up to $100 per replaced toilet for every high-volume toilet that is replaced with a low-volume model. There is a limit of two toilets per dwelling unit – residential, commercial or industrial.
New low-volume toilets use 1.6 gallons per flush or less, while older models may use up to 5 gallons per flush. The program is estimated to conserve as much as 10,900 gallons of water per day. The total cost of the program is being shared between the SWFWMD and Manatee County.
The rebate application must be approved prior to purchasing and installing the new low-volume toilet in order to receive a rebate. Single-family, multi-family, industrial and commercial customers may apply by calling (800) 964-2140 or by e-mailing the program administrator at MCRebate77@yahoo.com.
Educational material on toilet flapper replacement and other water conservation techniques are also available to all program participants.
For more information on the toilet rebate program, call Manatee County Utilities Office Specialist Marcia Brown at (941) 792-8811, ext. 5327. For more information on Manatee County Government, visit online at http://www.mymanatee.org or call (941) 748-4501.

 

 

 

Cost of Dual Flush Toilets – Material pricing and labor cost calculator

Source: http://www.homewyse.com/costs/cost_of_dual_flush_toilets.html#.TkZXouxq_mQ.facebook

July 2011

Do you need to know the range of average installed costs for Dual Flush Toilets in your zip code? Do you need an independent, 2011 cost breakdown of Dual Flush Toilet material and installation costs?

The Homewyse Dual Flush Toilet cost estimator provides up to date pricing information for your neighborhood. Enter your zip code, the size of your project below and click “Update”. The table below summarizes the average 2011 cost to install Dual Flush Toilets in your area for good, better and custom quality work.

Dual Flush Toilet Costs zip code units
Basic Better Best
Dual Flush Toilet Prices (Material Only) $195 – $260 $251 – $326 $317 – $382
Dual Flush Toilet Installation Cost $45 – $72 $67 – $95 $89 – $124
Dual Flush Toilet – Total $239 – $333 $318 – $421 $406 – $506
Dual Flush Toilet Average Cost per unit $286.05 $369.50 $455.91
  • In most situations, you will want to have Dual Flush Toilet installation completed by a Plumber. Use the free Homewyse checklist for effective, objective advice in finding, hiring and managing a capable and trustworthyPlumber. Avoid common problems and get quality work at a fair price.
  • You may want to consider having the Dual Flush Toilet installation completed by a Plumbing Contractor. But – do your homework to minimize common risks. Make sure that your Plumbing Contractor has relevant Dual Flush Toilet experience, that you verify past work, and that you follow the homewyse checklist to find and hire a capable service professional.
  • Avoid costly warranty and maintenance problems for your Dual Flush Toilet – insist that all work to be performed with proper installation techniques and materials. Use the homewyse Toilet Installation checklists to make sure important functional and aesthetic details are completed properly.

Dual Flush Toilets – Pricing and Installation Cost Notes

  • The homewyse cost estimates includes all typical costs for toilet, wax ring, toilet seat and plumbing supply connection.
  • The homewyse installation cost estimate does not include costs for repair or modification of existing subfloor, or location of drain or water connections.
  • Higher priced Dual Flush Toilets may include features such as designer styles, wider range of colors and advanced flushing capabilities.
  • Dual Flush Toilet installation costs are commonly quoted from a standard rate and can be estimated by the service professional with inspecting the job site.
  • Save money on the total project by having multiple vendors bid on the same, complete description of Dual Flush Toilet work for your project.
  • Save money on installation costs by being flexible on project scheduling and be willing to complete your work during slow periods for the service provider.
  • Save money by shopping online or by choosing discountinued, odd lot, remnant or incorrectly ordered items from your retailer.

City Seeking Applicants For High Efficiency Toilet Program | Corpus Christi, TX | KZTV10.com |

City Seeking Applicants For High Efficiency Toilet Program | Corpus Christi, TX | KZTV10.com |.

CORPUS CHRISTI – The City of Corpus Christi is looking for residents who want a new toilet, at no cost to them, but are willing to cover the costs of installation.

The High Efficiency Toilet (HET) program will use federal stimulus funds to provide 2,000 new toilets to qualified applicants. The fixtures use 1.28 gallons per flush, rather than the high volume 3.5 gallon toilets used by most residents.

The funds come from a $2,757,500 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant awarded to the city from the U.S. Department of Energy.

Residents selected will receive a voucher in the mail during the first week of September that is good for one HET and all associated installation hardware. The voucher will also identify the date, time, and location for pick-up of the HET which is scheduled for early fall. Residents are responsible for all costs associated with having the fixtures installed.

The toilets replaced by residents will be picked up by the City’s Solid Waste Operations Department. The city says the porcelain fixtures will be crushed and used to restore oyster reefs in local bays in partnership with Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi and Haas Materials.

To participate, homeowners can complete an application form athttp://www.CorpusChristiHET.com or by calling toll free 1-855-242-5214. Spanish speaking operators are available.

Mail-in applications are also available at the Corpus Christi Water Department located at 2726 Holly Road, at the Utility Business Office at City Hall, 1201 Leopard Street, or at any of the City’s public libraries.

To take a look at the types of toilets offered in the program, check out www.caromausa.com.

Japan’s Toilets Are Cooler Than Yours

Japan’s Toilets Are Cooler Than Yours.

Japan takes care of business in style.

Japan offers a wide variety of cultural excitement for tourists and locals but you definitely wouldn’t expect to see something like the Inax Museums back in the states. Located in Tokoname, outside of Nagoya, visitors of the Inax Live Museum can see the most innovative, fancy and funky functional toilets out there.

 

Here we have Inax’s luxurious Regio toilet with an automatic lid, illuminated bowl, and the best part: its own soundtrack composed by famous Japanese jazz pianist Yoshiko Kishino. In addition, the toilet releases its own germ-killing ions to keep this expensive piece of porcelain clean. How expensive is the Regio? Well the cheapest one has a suggested retail price of 462,000 yen (that’s $5,500).

 

Don’t let the design of this one fool you, you won’t be washing your hands with dirty recycled toilet water. This common water-conservation feature, referred to as spigots, reuses water from the sink for toilet flushing. Now all of that water you waste washing your hands and brushing your teeth can be used to flush the toilet.

 

Another expensive toilet, the Toto Neorest Hybrid features a tankless design that conserves water by using three different flush buttons. One of the buttons using a water-saving 1 gallon flush. In addition to its water conserving powers, the Neorest Hybrid includes the company’s famous bidet system, an innovative cyclone flushing system, automatic flush and deodorizer, nightlight and of course a state of the art Kenwood sound system. This fancy flusher starts at around $2,800.

 

For a look at more creative toilet designs from Japan, head on over to CNET’s article here.

 

Photos : Tim Hornyak / CNET

 

pottygirl.wordpress.com: Gainesville, GA

pottygirl.wordpress.com: Gainesville, GA #ToiletRebate criteria change | AccessNorthGa: http://wp.me/pd0E9-js

pottygirl.wordpress.com: Why do American

pottygirl.wordpress.com: Why do American #Toilets clog?: http://wp.me/pd0E9-jw

Caroma’s 2011 “One Flush Makes a Difference” Promotion – 50% off MSRP

http://www.caromausa.com/2011/02/09/2011_one_flush_makes_a_difference_50_off_promotion.php

2011 “One Flush Makes a Difference” Promotion

Caroma’s 50% off promotion is back! Last year’s promotion was a huge success and this year we’re once again inviting customers to receive a coupon for 50% off the list price of any qualifying Caroma toilet or sink at participating reseller locations*. The 2011 “One Flush Makes a Difference” promotion honors Earth Month and helps bring awareness to all that Caroma does to promote water-efficiency. You have until June 30, 2011 to participate in the promotion and receive 50 % off the list price of any qualifying Caroma toilet or sink.

Can One Flush Make a Difference?

Absolutely! In the United States federal law requires that new toilets must not exceed 1.6 gallons of water per flush (gpf). The high efficiency toilet (HET) category has set a standard in North America with 1.28 gallons per flush (gpf). Caroma’s HET’s go even further: The average flush of the toilets in Caroma’s standard collection is 1.06 gpf, while the Smart Series features an industry breaking 0.96 gpf!

Just think. If just one person uses a high efficiency toilet for one year then they will save around 330 gallons of water (based on the average three times a day flush). Further, if your toilet is from the 1980s, when new toilets were regulated to use 3.5 gallons of water per flush, you would save 2,410 gallons per year by switching to a HET toilet!

The numbers simply add up. If five people replaced their old 3.5 gpf toilet, over 12,000 gallons of water or the equivalent of 300 20-minute showers would be saved. One flush does make a difference, but if 2,000 people with new toilets switched to a HET toilet, in one year you would be able to fill an Olympic sized swimming pool with the water saved: 660,430 gallons! If 822 people using the old 3.5 gpf toilets changed to a Caroma HET toilet, we could fill an Olympic pool with the water saved!

Start Saving. Now you can save money and water at the same time with Caroma’s “One Flush Makes a Difference” 50% off promotion.

*Available through participating resellers only.
Excludes Invisi™ Series, Somerton Smart 270, Sydney Smart 305 One-Piece, Cube Ultra, H2 Zero Waterless and Flow Showerheads. Shipping not included. 50% discount is based off of the list price. Promotion runs from February 14, 2011 through June 30, 2011. Offer available to all North American residents (Canada exempt). Coupon must be present at time of purchase.
 

Click here to see Participating Dealers – if you are in Georgia, contact ecoTransitions.

All floor mounted models also qualify for the various toilet rebate programs in the US!

Pottygirl made it on the News flushing her potatoes: Road Warrior: Georgia Home, Garden Show

Road Warrior: Georgia Home, Garden Show.

Why do American toilets clog?

After I moved here from Germany I noticed that Americans often have a plunger in their bathrooms. It took me not very long to find out that toilets clog more often in North America than they do in Europe. I didn’t learn about the reason why they clog, until I started ecoTransitions during the drought in 2007, supplying Australian designed Caroma Dual Flush toilets to Georgians. It’s a matter of design, trap way size and flush method.

Standard US toilets clear the bowl with siphon technology, so the waste in the bowl gets pulled into the drain and out into the trap way. In order to create this siphon action, the trap way needs to be as narrow as possible, usually around 2 to 2 3/4 inches.  You can see how siphon vs. washdown technology works here

Although most of the time this flushing method gets rid of the waste efficiently, there is a tendency for blockages to occur in the toilet trap way.

Australian and European designed toilets use a wash down method which “pushes” the waste down, instead of of “pulling” it. This is why European toilets have a larger diameter trap way which results in less clogging.

One drawback wash down toilets have versus siphon models is the smaller water spot in the bowl, which can result in “skid marks” happening on ocassion.  So it really comes down to a matter of  personal preference. If you are comfortable with getting out a plunger to unclog your toilet every now and again, then stick with an American style toilet. If you have issues with clogged toilets and don’t mind using a toilet brush every now and then an Australian or European style model may work better for you.

Dekalb County, GA approves Water Rate Hike

The DeKalb County Board of Commissioners approved an 11 percent water and sewer rate increase to pay for nearly $1.4 billion in water and sewer system upgrades in the County.

If your home was built prior to 1993 and you haven’t upgraded your toilets yet, you are wasting a significant amount of water and money. By upgrading an old, inefficient toilet to a WaterSense labeled High Efficiency Dual Flush toilet you can reduce your water usage between 40% and 70%. On top of the water savings achieved by reduced water usage, you will also receive a $100 rebate from Dekalb County Watershed (if you meet the requirements) – details can be found here. If you opt for a Caroma Dual Flush toilet, you can also retire your plunger, as these toilets virtually do not clog (want proof? view this flushing video from ecoTransitions).

Do toilets go to heaven? by http://www.bluegranola.com/

Toilet –> Tile –> Trendy.

One rarely ponders the life and death of a toilet. Just like some kids ask if dogs go to heaven, I wonder where toilets go when their lifespan is up. For some of them, the answer is a Whole Foods juice bar. Fireclay Tile, a Northern California-based ceramic tile company, uses recycled materials such as porcelain from local used toilets to create its product. According to their website, “All products are handmade within Fireclay’s day-lit, open air factory where the company reuses everything including clays, glazes and waste water.”

toilet1 1024x768 Toilet   > Tile   > Trendy

Ok, pause. Why is going around collecting old toilets and making them into counter tops for yuppies important?

Answer: Throwing away large clunky items like toilets contributes to our problem of overflowing landfills. Instead, we should do everything we can to waste less and reuse more. Turning a toilet into a tile does just that because by reusing the porcelain, Fireclay lowers the amount of pollution that would otherwise be emitted by creating all new material from scratch. Also, the company only uses things it can find from nearby sources which significantly reduces its carbon footprint.

Point is- recycling, reusing, and buying local does not only apply to soda cans, plastic bags, and vegetables. People are creating innovative ways to do their part for the planet all the time using their own unique talents. Cool.

 

pottygirl’s blogging year 2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads This blog is on fire!.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A helper monkey made this abstract painting, inspired by your stats.

The average container ship can carry about 4,500 containers. This blog was viewed about 16,000 times in 2010. If each view were a shipping container, your blog would have filled about 4 fully loaded ships.

 

In 2010, there were 90 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 198 posts. There was 1 picture uploaded, taking a total of 171kb.

The busiest day of the year was May 3rd with 93 views. The most popular post that day was Who’s To Blame For The Great Pacific Garbage Patch? Look In The Mirror..

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were en.wordpress.com, greenhomeguide.com, search.aol.com, linkedin.com, and google.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for penta water scam, caroma toilet reviews, the great pacific garbage patch facts, water conservation, and water scams exposed.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Who’s To Blame For The Great Pacific Garbage Patch? Look In The Mirror. September 2009
1 Like on WordPress.com,

2

10 drinking water scams exposed November 2009
1 comment

3

Toilet Rebate Programs in the US February 2009
5 comments

4

Caroma Toilet Review | H2O Report October 2009

5

City of Raleigh, NC WaterSense toilet replacement rebate program June 2010
2 comments

It’s official: Atlanta is the first City in the Southeast offering a toilet rebate program for apartment buildings and condominiums

Mayor Kasim Reed officially announced the first Multi-Family toilet rebate program in the Southeastern United States during the City of Atlanta’s Sustainability Week, October 25-29, 2010. In his  “Power to Change” speech, he outlined how Atlanta plans to become one of the top-ten sustainable cities in the nation.

Below you will find the details on the Multi-family toilet rebate program – you can also visit  the following link for the rebate application. http://www.atlantawatershed.org/owe/multi-family-toilet-rebate.htm

Multi-family Toilet Rebate Program

The City of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management extends its high-efficiency toilet rebate to multifamily customers

Apartment and condominium communities that are City of Atlanta water customers may qualify if the following criteria are met:

  • The property was built prior to 1993
  • Existing toilets use more than 1.6 gallons per flush
  • Property owner/manager is up-to-date on water bill payments
  • Property owner/manager has water and sewer account with DWM
  • Property owner/manager agrees to a pre-installation water audit inspection by DWM
  • Property owner/manager purchases all fixtures and arranges for/pays for installation
  • Property owner/manager provides proof of purchase (original receipts) and proof of installation (plumber/contractor statement or invoice)
  • Property owner/manager contracts with a licensed waste hauler who will transport used porcelain toilets to one of two porcelain recyclers in the Atlanta area (documentation from recycler required)
  • Property owner/manager agrees to a post-installation verification site visit by DWM
  • Property owner/manager completes a multifamily toilet rebate application (which includes all documentation listed above)

If the above criteria are met, the property owner/manager will receive a $100 rebate for each toilet replaced with a 1.28 gallon-per-flush or less EPA WaterSense toilet. Look for the water sense label label.

Rebates will be applied to the water account(s) for the property in question.

Rebates will be applied to qualifying applicants on a first-come, first-served basis as long as funding is available.

For more information about the Multifamily Toilet Rebate Program, contact Jennifer Carlile, jcarlile@atlantaga.gov, (404) 546-1265.