U.S. Falling Short Of Its Goals To Improve Access To Clean Water, Sanitation Worldwide, Report Says – Kaiser Global Health

U.S. Falling Short Of Its Goals To Improve Access To Clean Water, Sanitation Worldwide, Report Says – Kaiser Global Health.

Friday, November 19, 2010

The U.S. is falling short on its goal of improving conditions for the 2.6 billion people worldwide without access to clean water and sanitation despite the fact the Water for the Poor Act became law in 2005, according to a report released Thursday by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), WaterAid, CARE and 11 other organization, Food Safety News reports (11/19).

“A lack of strategic planning; inadequate political prioritization of safe water, sanitation and hygiene issues; and limited programming capacity at the United States Agency of International Development (USAID) and the State Department are just some of the reasons the government has fallen behind on the implementation of the law, the groups say,” according to a NRDC press release. In the report, the advocate groups outline several recommendations for the Obama administration to take “immediately” to help “address the global sanitation crisis,” the press release states. The report also urges the U.S. Congress to pass the Water for the World Act, which they argue “can help build the capacity within the government to implement the Water for the Poor Act … and would set a target for reaching 100 million people worldwide with safe water and sanitation,” according to the press release.

“In order to ensure that the U.S. government and U.S. taxpayers are getting the most possible out of this investment, it is crucial that the administration release a real strategy by which its efforts can be judged,” Peter Lochery, director of the Water Team at CARE, said in the press release (11/18).

“Approximately 4,000 children under 5 years old in the developing world die each day from diarrheal diseases. Diarrhea caused by unsafe water and sanitation kills more children under 5 every year than HIV/AIDS, malaria, and measles combined,” Food Safety News reports. The release of the report coincided with World Toilet Day on Friday, Nov. 19 (11/18).

Also reporting on World Toilet Day, IRIN examines the business behind efforts to bring toilets to some of the billions worldwide without them, writing, ” Entrepreneur turned toilet crusader Jack Sim from Singapore wants to turn the toilet into the new gold standard of status in Asia, which would signify ‘making it.'” However, “for this to happen, aid groups, which have long promoted the health and hygiene benefits of safe toilets for the world’s estimated 2.6 billion people who do not have a toilet, need to step aside and let the market take over, said Sim,” according to the news service.

According to the article, the World Toilet Organization (WTO), which Sim founded in 2001, “wants … to mass market toilets (in countries lacking them) through SaniShops ‘social franchises’ which will provide marketing and sales training, branding, and maintenance support,” the news service writes. “Starting in Cambodia, where diarrhoea linked to open defecation kills 11,000 people every year – more than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, combined – Sim wants to ‘tap into people’s dreams rather than fears,'” IRIN writes. “If you tell someone they may die of diarrhoea, it is not much of an incentive to build a toilet. But if toilets become a sign of wealth, jealousy over their neighbours’ latrines will drive them to build their own.”

“With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development, WTO piloted the production and sales of toilets designed by the NGO International Development Enterprises Cambodia … Retailing at US$32, $6 profit goes to the manufacturer and $1 goes to the seller. Villagers have produced and sold 2,000 pour-flush latrines thus far, and WTO wants to create more factories, which cost $400 each to set up” (11/19).

USA Today Examines How Haiti’s Water, Sanitation Issues Exacerbate Cholera Outbreak

Saying that the Haitian government has done little to improve the country’s water and sanitation systems since the Jan. 12 earthquake, aid groups worry the cholera outbreak that struck the country, killing more than 1,100 will only grow worse, USA Today reports. While installing permanent water systems is less expensive than delivering emergency aid, without a plan from the Haitian government, aid groups on the ground continue to deliver emergency supplies, according to Oxfam spokeswoman Julie Schindall.

“The U.N.’s water and sanitation group had planned water and sewer projects to expand the piped water system and move Haitians away from emergency water. They await government approval,” the newspaper writes. Mark Henderson, chief of the UNICEF Water, Sanitation and Hygiene program in Haiti, noting how all attention is focused on stopping the cholera outbreak, suggested the outbreak may eventually lead to increased pressure on the Haitian government to improve water and sanitation conditions.

Even before the earthquake, “more than a third of Haitians lacked access to clean water,” USA Today writes, and now “[l]ess than one-fifth of the population has access to a simple latrine or toilet, Henderson says. … In the Artibonite area, where the cholera epidemic began, most people use the Artibonite River for bathing, drinking and going to the toilet, and do not have access to chlorinated water that could kill the cholera bacteria. Many of Port-au-Prince’s slums have no running water or sewer systems.”

Imogen Wall, spokeswoman for the U.N. Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, and Henry Gray, emergency water and sanitation coordinator for Doctors Without Borders, are also quoted in the article (Leiwand, 11/19).

Atlanta Journal-Constitution Looks At Coca-Cola’s Efforts To Conserve Water, Criticisms Company Is Causing Water Problems In Some Regions

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution contrasts Coca-Cola’s efforts to conserve water globally and improve their company’s water efficiency to criticisms by some that the volume of water Coca-Cola uses is behind some of the problems facing water stressed regions throughout the world.

“From southern Europe to parts of India and China, Mexico and the U.S., many of Coca-Cola’s territories are facing or could face water stress. According to the United Nations, almost 900 million people worldwide do not have access to clean water. In a decade, two-thirds of the projected population of 8 billion could live in water-stressed areas,” the newspaper writes. The article details an ongoing debate in India over Coca-Cola’s impact on the environment and water conditions, including an argument by some that the company is to blame for exacerbating the water stress in an Indian village.

Still, as the article notes, Coca-Cola has committed to several efforts to improving water usage around the world, including water recycling and educational outreach efforts to farmers. “In addition to its work around freshwater basins, the company has committed to spending $30 million by 2015 to provide access to safe drinking water in Africa. The Replenish Africa Initiative aims to provide at least two million Africans with clean water and sanitation,” the newspaper writes. “According to the World Health Organization, more than 300 million Africans lack access to safe drinking water, and millions die each year from waterborne illnesses. Coca-Cola’s cash will go toward technology such as rainwater harvesting, hand pumps, pipe systems and chlorine treatment systems,” the newspaper writes (McWilliams, 11/18).

 

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Receive 50% off MSRP on any Caroma toilet during the month of April

Start Saving. With one flush we can make a difference and save the most precious resource on earth! See below to learn more about how One Flush Can Make a Difference!

Please fill out this form to receive 50% off the MSRP of all Caroma toilets. There are no limits on the number of Caroma toilets you can purchase with this discount. Additional shipping charges may apply.

This promotion will run through the month of April in observance of Earth Day!

Can One Flush Make a Difference?

Absolutely! In the United States federal law requires that new toilets must not exceed 1.6 gallons of water per flush (gpf).The high efficiency toilet (HET) category has set a standard in North America with 1.28 gallons per flush (gpf). Caroma’s HET’s go even further: The average flush of the toilets in Caroma’s standard collection is 1.06 gpf, while the Smart Series features an industry breaking .96 gpf!

Just think. If just one person uses a high efficiency toilet for one year then they will save around 330 gallons of water (based on the average three times a day flush). Further, if your toilet is from the 1980s, when new toilets were regulated to use 3.5 gallons of water per flush, you would save 2,410 gallons per year by switching to a HET toilet! One flush CAN make a difference.

The numbers simply add up. If five people replaced their old 3.5 gpf toilet, over 12,000 gallons of water or the equivalent of 300, 20 minute showers would be saved. One flush does make a difference, but if 2,000 people with new toilets switched to a HET toilet, in one year you would be able to fill an Olympic sized swimming pool with the water saved: 660,430 gallons! If 822 people using the old 3.5 gpf toilets changed to a Caroma HET toilet, we could fill an Olympic pool with the water saved!

Refill, NOT Landfill!

Source: Pete van Cleve, Water for Life

Save Money, Save Plastic, Save the Planet…Refill Not Landfill! 

Plastic ½ liter Bottles versus buying a Kinetico K5 Drinking Water Station from Water for Life.  

24 plastic ½ liter bottles = 3.17 Gal. @ $5.00 = $1.58 per gallon x 500 Gal. = $790 x 10 = $7900.  Equivalent of 3 cases per week for the average family of 4 saves you more than enough to buy and maintain two K5’s for 10 years and keeps 37,440 ½ liter plastic bottles out of the landfill.   Don’t use that many bottles now?  Cut it in half = $3850 saves you enough to buy and maintain one K5 for 10 years and keep 18,720 ½ liter plastic bottles out of the landfill. 

Two people drinking 1 bottle each per day for lunch for 270 working days per year @ $1.00 =$540 per year x 10 years = $5410.  You save enough to buy and maintain two K5’s for 10 years and eliminate 5400 plastic bottles or cans from the landfill.  Double these results for a family of 4.  

K5 VOCGuard =   $1419 installed year 1 price @ 500 gallons = $2.84 per gallon

                                    $197.50 service year 2 price @ 500 gallons = .395 per gallon

                                    $760.00 parts year 2 -10 price @ 500 gallons = .19 per gallon

                                    $2376.50 Total 10 year cost  

 Keep the Convenience,  Eliminate the Plastic,  Save the Planet…Refill Not Landfill! 

When you purchase a K5 Drinking Water Station from Water for Life, we provide each member of your family with their choice of a Water for Life Glass Pitcher and 4 Glasses or up to 4 refillable, dishwasher safe Stainless Steel, Eastar, or Polycarbonate bottles to use at games, to take outside while mowing the lawn, to take with you in the car, to take to work or school, and to use while watching TV instead of washing glasses or using plastic cups.   

Live more Abundantly with the K5 Drinking Water Station…Refill Not Landfill!

Are you rationing your expensive pure water bottles just for some drinking now and using 1 case or less per week?  With a K5 Drinking Water Station from Water for Life, Mom can cook or make coffee with it, give a treat to the dog, get the kids drinking more water, water the plants with it, use it in the steam iron, make ice cubes with it, make drink mix drinks instead of Coke or juice when the kids want something sweet, fill the stainless steel bottles half way and freeze them overnight and refill them completely before games for an ice cold drink at lunch, work, or school,  and Dad can drink ice cold purified water instead of Coke after mowing the lawn, serve K5 water for dinner from a pitcher into glasses instead of drinking Cokes or using more bottles, make mixed drinks with K5 water when friends come over,  make iced tea with K5 water at parties or serve pure water from the Water for Life Pitcher into Water for Life Glasses to guests instead of passing out plastic bottles.  Extra bottles or Glassware are available for purchase. 

Healthier Family…Refill Not Landfill! 

If your average family of 4 each buys a Coke per day for lunch spending .50 cents each for 270 days per year, you will spend $540 per year and $5410 in 10 years on Coke! Wouldn’t it be healthier to drink Cokes only every other day and drink K5 water on alternative days?  The savings actually pays for two K5’s and the family would be healthier because they would be consuming less sugar or artificial sweetener, less caffeine and carbonation, less artificial flavor and food color.  What if you drank pure water every day?

Go to this link http://www.waterforlifeonline.com/k5_video.html to view a 4 minute K5 video.                                                                                                                           

visit Water for Life online or call them at 770-578-0600 

 Always fresh,  Always pure…Guaranteed!                  Call 770-578-0600

Caroma donates Dual Flush toilets to Greensburg, Kansas

Caroma, the leader in dual flush toilets, urinals, and stylish bathroom sinks, is pleased to donate another 250 high efficiency toilets,
urinals, and sinks to Greensburg GreenTown. Greensburg, Kansas, was devastated by an EF5 tornado on May 4, 2007. Nearly 95% of homes and businesses were destroyed by the two mile wide tornado.
Greensburg GreenTown is a nonprofit organization established to provide residents of Greensburg with resources, information, and the support they need to rebuild the city as a model green community. According to Daniel Wallach, Director of the Greensburg GreenTown project,
“The tornado that hit the city and surrounding areas in 2007 caused massive devastation. Since we basically had to start from the ground up in the rebuilding efforts, we want to build in a sustainable fashion, to preserve our precious resources.”
As part of this conservation effort, Caroma has donated 250 high efficiency toilets and urinals to Greensburg. Greensburg now has ~450 high efficiency toilets from Caroma and is projected to save at least 4600 gallons of water per person per year. Many of the city’s buildings were built in the 1960s or early, so many toilets were either 3.5 or 5 gallon toilets.
“By installing Caroma toilets that average only 0.96 gallons per flush, we could save more than 18,000 gallons of water per year for a family of four,” explains Wallach. “Caroma’s generous donation is not only helping the families that were in need, but it will also help us with LEED
Platinum certification for the most of the city and county buildings. The best part: we’re also preserving our environments by conserving hundreds of thousands of gallons of water each year. The best part is that we didn’t have to compromise our way of life. The Caroma toilets are a
technologically advanced toilet and everyone who has received has very positive comments.”
According to Derek Kirkpatrick, North America General Manager, “The people of Greensburg have done an amazing job of rebuilding a city and a community after such a destructive EF5 tornado. We are excited about Greensburg rebuilding as a sustainable community and the progress they have made. The Caroma donation of high efficiency dual flush toilets will help their efforts to conserve precious water resources while also showing how easy it is to preserve the environment. With simply installing or replacing an older toilet with a water-conserving toilet, communities can save millions of gallons of water each year. Greensburg is becoming a model green community and we wish them continued success in their rebuilding efforts.”
For more information on Caroma’s high efficiency toilets and urinals, email info@caromausa.com or visit http://www.caromausa.com. To find out more information about the Greenburg GreenTown project, visit www.greensburggreentown.org.

About Caroma
Since 1941, Caroma has been a world leader in quality and innovation of bathroom products, continually providing reliable, high efficiency toilet suites and urinals and stylish sinks. With 41 WaterSense labeled toilets – more than any company in the industry – and complimentary, stylish sinks, Caroma offers award-winning products that help preserve the world’s most valuable resource – water. Combining quality, water-conserving products with superior customer service, Caroma has been chosen by businesses and households worldwide for exceptional performance and stylish design. The company can be contacted by phone at 1 800 605 4218, via email at info@caromausa.com, or on the Web at www.caromausa.com.

About Greensburg GreenTown
Greensburg GreenTown is a nonprofit organization established to provide the residents of Greensburg, Kansas with the resources, information, and support they need to rebuild Greensburg as a model green community following the May 2007 tornado. The organization aspires to make it easier for residents to implement and make green living appealing to residents and bring in resources and support from around the country to make Greensburg a model green community. Find out more about Greenburg GreenTown at http://www.greensburggreentown.org.

Source: Caroma Press Release

How eating 4 burgers less per year can save 2,500 to 5,000 gallons of water

Not even to mention the calories and the cholesterol……

No, seriously. I never thought about it this way:

It takes about 5,000 gallons of water to produce just one pound of beef. No, cows don’t drink that much water, but it takes so much to grow the corn they eat.

You don’t have to become a vegetarian or vegan to conserve water. But – going meatless for one day a week can make a big impact and can be a lot of fun too! Involve your kids to create tasty meals without meat. If you have to have meat, opt for chicken instead.

Why save Water?

Of all the water in the world, only 3% is fresh. Less than one third of 1% of this fresh water is available for human use. We are depleting our underground aquifers faster than we are replenishing them. The largest one, the Ogallala, which covers a vast part of the country from the Midwest to the mountain states, is being depleted by 13 trillion gallons a year. Eventually it is going to run out – and then what? Northwest Texas is already dry. They can’t get any water from their wells.

Our growing population is putting stress on available water supplies. The U.S. population almost doubled from 1950 to 2000. The demand however, tripled! Americans use an average of 100 gallons of water each day-enough to fill 1,600 drinking glasses! This increased demand has put additional stress on water supplies and distribution systems, threatening both human health and the environment.

We all need to do our part to save water. Visit http://epa.gov/watersense/ to find out how you can save water in your home. Little changes that make a big difference!

 

Think outside the bottle!

Join me and break the bottled water habit! Getting rid of bottled water is a win-win! You save money and water and help lessen the amount of plastic in landfills! You can now even win a trip to Glacier National Park. Please learn more about the campain here  http://water.newdream.org/campaigns/water/register/78023085e295e74b21a82b2bb7894a34/ 

Break the Bottled Water Habit, Win a Prize and Cut Your Carbon

When you want pure, healthy drinking water, you should reach for bottled water, right? Surprisingly, on neither a personal nor a global level are you making a healthy choice.

For each gallon of water bottled, two gallons are wasted; producing the plastic wastes  the energy equivalent of a quarter-bottle’s worth of oil. And what’s in the bottle could just be tap water.

New American Dream and Corporate Accountability International is asking you to think about where the water in that bottle came from, where the plastic is going, and take the Break the Bottled Water Habit pledge(water.newdream.org) and drink to a healthy ecosystem.

During October, make a conscious choice to slake your thirst without drying up our planet’s resources. In addition to benefiting the environment, participants will have a chance to win a free condo for a week at a ski resort in Idaho.  Visit the website (water.newdream.org now to get started.

Water is LIFE

 

 

A few months ago, on World Water Day, I saw Stephen Colbert’s show dedicated to Water. Colbert Report, March 20, 2008

Regardless of the opinion you may have of him as a comedian or on his political views, he made some very valid points and had some very interesting interviews. Please visit Water is Life on Colbert to view some of the videos; especially thirst locally – drink globally and Visit to the American Museum of Natural History is extremely interesting (more info on this exhibit can be found here Exhibition H2O=Life)

Clean, plentiful water is not always available where and when it’s needed. Indeed, water shortages and pollution threaten individuals, communities and countries around the globe. But many water problems also have solutions. From households to huge cities, elected officials to entrepreneurs, everyone has a role to play in protecting Earth’s water.

 

How much water do people use each day?

573 liters (151 gallons) per person per day U.S., average domestic and municipal use

118 liters (31 gallons) per person per day United Kingdom, average domestic and municipal use

10 liters (3 gallons) per person per day Ethiopia, average domestic and municipal use

People in the U.S. and Canada use much more water than residents of most other countries. In the U.K. and most other European countries, people live more water-efficient lifestyles. Most Ethiopians, like many others in the developing world, can’t get enough water to ensure basic health and sanitation.

 

Message in a Bottle

The average North American in 2005 consumed about 80 liters (21 gallons) of bottled water. Globally, consumption nearly doubled between 1997 and 2005, and the U.S. is the largest total consumer of bottled water. Manufacturing all those bottles uses a lot of water—twice as much as the bottles contain. Worldwide, over 2.7 million tons of plastic are used for water bottles, but in the U.S. only about 20 percent of the bottles are recycled. The total estimated energy needed to make, transport and dispose of one bottle of water is equivalent to filling the plastic bottle one-quarter full of oil.

 

Pure Imagination

People often choose bottled water assuming it’s safer than tap water, and perhaps imagining it comes from a pristine mountain spring. Most bottled water is safe-but so is the municipal water that is the source of an estimated 40 percent of U.S. bottled water. About 25% of bottled water sold is simply re-processed/used municipal(city) water according to a 1999 study in the United States.[10] Both Aquafina from Pepsi-Cola Company and Dasani from The Coca-Cola Company are reprocessed from municipal water systems. [11][12] Some bottled waters, such as Penta Water make unverified health benefit claims. While there have been few comprehensive studies, one analysis several years ago found that about 22 percent of brands that were tested contain, in at least one sample, chemical contaminants at levels above strict state health limits. If consumed over a long period of time, some of these contaminants could cause cancer or other health problems[13] at rates higher than those considered tolerable by the regulatory body setting the standards. In addition, 60 to 70 percent of all bottled water in the U.S. is packaged and sold in a state that is not regulated by the FDA

 

Smarter Solutions

If you want to carry water with you, why not get a reusable bottle and refill it at the tap?

 

By the Numbers

Average price of tap water in the U.S. = less than $.01 a gallon

Average price of bottled water in the U.S. = about $10 a gallon

More on Bottled Water on Wikipedia