Pasco County Utility offering rebates for toilets

Utility offering rebates for toilets.

NEW PORT RICHEY – Instead of flushing their money down the toilet, Pasco County Utilities customers can take advantage of a rebate of up to $100 to buy low-flow toilets.

About 750 rebates will be available in west Pasco, according to county officials, on a first-come, first-served basis.

People can save $100 toward the first replacement toilet and $80 for a second toilet. Newer models use about 1.6 gallons per flush, compared to 3.5 gallons for standard toilets.

To qualify, a Pasco Utilities customer must live in a home built in or before 1994.

The applicant must save the old toilet to verify it is a 3.5-gallon model.

A copy of the last water bill is needed.

A private contractor, Demetri’s Solutions, is handling the program on behalf of the county utility department. Participants must call Demetri’s first at (727) 810-0168 to qualify and reserve the rebate. More information is online at the Utilities page of the Pasco County website, or go directly to pascorebate.com.

Once an applicant has sent back the application with original receipt and top portion of the water bill, the program administrator will set up a time to inspect the new toilet or toilets and haul away the old ones.

The rebate program is funded by the county and the basin boards of Southwest Florida Water Management District.

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Low-flow toilets at schools in Albuquerque Public Schools

http://www.aps.edu/news/aps-saves-water-taxpayer-dollars-through-district-wide-toilet-replacement

Albuquerque Public Schools and the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority have collaborated to install low-flow toilets at schools throughout the district, an effort expected to save more than $25,000 and 13.5 million gallons of water each year. Read more

Toilet rebate program in the City of Camrose, AB Canada

Source: http://www.camrosecanadian.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=1645347, By JEFFREY KU/City of Camrose

The City of Camrose is bringing back the Low Flow Toilet Rebate Program for 2009’s summer season from July 1 to Aug. 31. The rebate offers $80 to those who replace an older, high volume toilet with a eligible, newer low-flow model in their home with a limit of one per household for purchases after Oct. 31, 2008 and installations before Aug. 31, 2009.

The City of Camrose is running the Low Flow Toilet Rebate Program again hoping that it will encourage and educate the citizens of Camrose on the subject of water conservation. Conserving water will not only benefit the environment from which the resource is taken, but it will also benefit the City by reducing the load put on the water treatment plant and citizens and reducing their water bills by using less water. All citizens of the City of Camrose who live within city limits are eligible for this rebate. To qualify for the program, the City of Camrose must receive the following:

1. The address in which the toilet is to be installed.

2. Receipt of purchase of new, approved low-flow toilet.

3. Pictures of the washroom, before and after installation.

4. Evidence that the toilet was made none functional.

Camrose is running this program alongside, but having no affiliation with the federal government’s Home Renovation Tax Credit and ecoENERGY Retrofit—home grant programs that offer tax benefits for those doing certain home renovations. For more information, contact Jeffrey Ku with the City of Camrose at 780-672-4428 or e-mail at engineer@camrose.ca

Lack of money for rebates halts Inland distribution of water-saving toilets

Source http://www.pe.com/localnews/inland/stories/PE_News_Local_S_toilets02.48120c7.html

By LAURIE LUCAS
The Press-Enterprise

 
Western Municipal Water District’s participation in a program that this week will finish delivering 1,500 water-saving toilets at no cost to Riverside County homes, hotels and commercial buildings is in limbo because of doubt about whether Western will receive promised rebates.

In the past three months, the Mission Inn, UC Riverside and March Air Reserve Base received a total of 1,000 of the toilets, and 500 went to Corona, mostly to multifamily residences such as apartments.

One low-flow toilet will save about 2 gallons per flush or 4,800 gallons a year, according to Clay Monroe, water conservation coordinator with Riverside Public Utilities.

But the program was suspended because of the uncertainty of reimbursement from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, said Tim Barr. He’s the water use efficiency manager for Western, which covers 527 square miles serving 853,000 people in the Jurupa Valley, Corona, Norco, Riverside, Moreno Valley, Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Canyon Lake and Temecula. Besides Riverside, the city of Corona also worked closely with Barr to promote the project.

Metropolitan’s blanket program, “SoCal Water$mart” was designed as a conservation incentive for the 26 cities and agencies that buy its water in six counties for 19 million people. Rebates on high-efficiency toilets and other equipment had been available to residents of areas that receive MWD water, including Eastern and Western municipal water districts in Riverside County and Inland Empire Utilities Agency in western San Bernardino County.

Barr said Western drew up its own marketing campaign touting low-flow toilets.

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William Wilson Lewis III / The Press-Enterprise
Michael Franchek, vice president of sales and marketing with Ecogreen Services, removes a 3.5-gallon toilet from an apartment in Riverside.

8,000 INSTALLED

Eastern installed 8,000 of the low-flow toilets this last fiscal year. The agency has shelved requests for another 1,500 until Metropolitan resolves its budget problems. Perris-based Eastern serves an area from Moreno Valley south to Temecula and east to Hemet and San Jacinto.

The Inland Empire Utilities Agency installed 4,256 low-flow toilets this last fiscal year. Chino-based Inland serves the cities of Chino, Chino Hills, Fontana, Montclair, Ontario, and Upland as well as the Cucamonga Valley and Monte Vista Water Districts and the Water Facilities Authority.

Initially, Metropolitan agreed to pitch in anywhere from $50 to $100 per toilet; Western would pick up the rest of the cost from its rate payers. But because Metropolitan didn’t have the money to cover the overwhelming demand for rebates, Western could be on the hook for anywhere from $65 to $110 per toilet, Barr said. “So Metropolitan is suspending its commercial program from three to six months until after an audit and they figure out how to go forward,” Barr said.

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Low-flow toilets save about 2 gallons per flush, or 4,800 gallons a year, conservation experts say.

MWD’s regional rebate program is $24 million in the hole. The program started with $20 million, which doubled last February. Those resources dried up in May and the board turned off the spending tap until an audit is complete. A report is expected at the next board meeting, July 14.

The San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District, the regional equivalent of Metropolitan, serving 700,000 water users over 350 square miles, might offer a similar water conservation program, according to Douglass Headrick, deputy general manager. “We’re watching to see how this will play out with Metropolitan,” he said.

PROGRAM WINDS DOWN

Meanwhile, Western’s program is winding down this week with toilet installations concluding in the Sandra Apartments on 7th Street in Riverside, said contractor Michael Franchek.

His Encinitas-based company, Ecogreen Services, contracted with Western Municipal in April to install 1,500 toilets at $165 apiece. Since April, Franchek has placed 80 percent of the new toilets in multi-family residences and the rest in hotels and commercial buildings.

Low-flow toilets look no different from their predecessors and cost about the same, according to Franchek.

“They flow a lot less because of their intelligent design,” he said.

The old fixtures use 3.5 gallons per flush while their replacements use less than 1.3 gallons per flush. Recyclers grind up the put-out-to-pasture toilets which are used as construction aggregate.

Russ Kitchen, director of the Mission Inn’s property operations, said he’s pleased with the 80 new low-flows, the latest in the hotel’s efforts to go green.

“We’re always looking for ways to conserve our natural resources,” he said. Management has retrofitted its cooling center to use less energy and replaced most lighting with fluorescent bulbs.

Reach Laurie Lucas at 951-368-9569 or llucas@PE.com

TO SAVE WATER

Take shorter showers

Turn off the faucet when brushing teeth

Water your lawn only when it needs it

Use a broom to clean driveways and sidewalks

Adjust sprinklers so they don’t water driveways and sidewalks

Wash only full loads of laundry

Run dishwasher only when full

Fix leaky faucets and toilets

Use a shut-off nozzle on your hose

Plant drought-resistant trees and plants

Source: Western Municipal Water District

 

 

A toilet scam

COMMERCE, Calif. (KABC) — There’s a warning Monday about a so-called “toilet scam.” Someone has been going around claiming to represent local water officials. They tell residents there’s a new law requiring people to install “low-flow” toilets.

Read the full story here

King of the Hill – Flush with power!

Watch this episode of King of the Hill and see why you should opt for Caroma Dual Flush toilets! The Sydney 270 Easy Height Elongated is rated to flush 1000 grams (that is 2.2 lbs) of solid waste with one single flush, PLUS, with a 3.5″ trapway, our toilets won’t clog! Visit our YouTube site to watch how we flush potatoes with 0.8 gallons of water! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESOwyMAf-mk

http://www.casttv.com/shows/king-of-the-hill/flush-with-power/zse2g71