Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels | Green Lodging News

Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels | Green Lodging News.

Source: Green Lodging News

Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels

 

 

5/6/2009

 

HILLSBORO, ORE.—Drury Hotels, a 100 percent family owned and operated mid-scale hotel company, has chosen Caroma, a leader in dual flush toilets, to supply water-saving toilets to seven hotels in the Drury chain, including the Drury Inn and Suites, Pear Tree Inn, and the Drury Plaza. This includes three retrofit projects (one in 2007 and two completed in early 2009) to replace older, higher water usage toilets and four new constructions (one in 2008 and 2009 and two in 2010).

Caroma’s first installation with Drury Hotels in 2007 was part of San Antonio Water System’s commercial toilet retrofit program at the Pear Tree Inn, San Antonio, Texas. As a result of high efficiency dual flush toilets and low flow showerheads being installed, the water consumption reduced by an average of 50 percent from 2006 to 2009 for the same three-month period. The impressive results in water savings and performance are now being experienced in other Drury Hotels in San Antonio as well as Flagstaff, Ariz., and in hotels opening during 2009 and 2010 in Phoenix, Wichita, Kan., and San Antonio.

Caroma was chosen as the dual flush toilet provider to help maximize water savings in the bathrooms. The Sydney Smart range was installed during two retrofit projects in early 2009. The Sydney Smart features a 1.28 gallon full flush button for solid waste and 0.8 gallon half flush option for liquid and paper waste, averaging just 0.9 gallons per flush. This saves nearly 44 percent more water compared to the nationally-mandated 1.6 gallon toilet. Assuming an average of 125 rooms with a 70 percent occupancy rate and eight flushes per room, one Drury hotel can save more than 664,000 gallons of water annually compared to a 3.5 gallon toilet and 178,000 gallons compared to a single flush 1.6 gallon toilet. The Sydney range installed in two earlier hotel projects use 1.6 gallons per flush for solid waste and 0.8 gallons per flush for liquid and paper waste, averaging only 0.96 gallons per flush based on a 1:4 full/half flush ratio.

Water Expenses Reduced

“Our focus at Drury Hotels is ensuring that our guests receive quality and consistency at a good value,” says Gregg Mrzlak, mechanical project manager from Drury Southwest, Inc. “We are also very aware of the drought conditions throughout the Southwest, and by using Caroma water-conserving toilets, we are able to save considerable water each year and reduce our water costs. A great added benefit by using Caroma is a reduction in maintenance due to blockages being eliminated. We have been very pleased with the dual flush toilets and will be using them in future retrofits and new installations where possible.”

“The Caroma dual flush toilets have been a great addition to our hotels because they reduce hotel water costs considerably each year and reduce the burden on San Antonio’s water systems,” says Danielle Poyner, LEED AP for Drury Southwest, Inc. “In addition to these benefits, the toilets have also contributed to Drury Hotels earning LEED Certification at the Drury Inn & Suites in Flagstaff and for hotels seeking LEED certification that will be opening soon, including Drury Inn & Suites La Cantera in San Antonio, Texas, Drury Inn & Suites in Phoenix, and Drury Plaza in Wichita, Kan.”

“In addition to the substantial water savings experienced at the Pear Tree Inn, we have reduced the number of clogs from three to five per week prior to Caroma toilets being installed to zero clogs in more than two years,” explains Aaron Francisco, property manager at Pear Tree Inn, San Antonio. “Our customers like the fact that we are helping conserve water, but also that the toilets look very modern. We didn’t have to sacrifice style for water conservation.”

Go to Caroma.

Plunger or Brush?

During my very first visit to the US (during my honeymoon, to be precise) I had my very first, very embarrassing experience with a plunger. After all, it happened at my mother-in-law’s house. As it happened again at a hotel in Las Vegas a few years later, I still didn’t understand why I clog a toilet in the US, but never have before in Germany.

I moved to the US many years later and bought an older home. As the drought in Georgia worsened in 2007, I noticed that the toilets in our home used 3.5 gallons for each flush. I started looking around in home improvement stores and was stunned that all toilets available used 1.6 gallons for each flush. As toilets with the option of using very little water for flushing No. 1 have been available in Germany  for a very long time, I could not believe I couldn’t find them here. So after much research, I finally found Caroma Dual Flush toilets and decided to spread the word and help Georgians flushing less water and money down the toilet. After I learned why Caroma toilets work so well with very little water, I realized why American toilets clog. So finally, 16 years later I realized that there was nothing wrong with me, or my diet, that I clogged a toilet on my honeymoon!

Standard US toilets clear the bowl with siphon technology, so the waste in the bowl gets pulled into the drain and out into the trap way. In order to create this siphon action, the trap way needs to be as narrow as possible, usually around 2 to 2 3/4 inches. You can see how siphon vs. washdown technology works here

Although most of the time this flushing method gets rid of the waste efficiently, there is a tendency for blockages to occur in the toilet trap way.

Australian and European designed toilets use a wash down method which “pushes” the waste down, instead of “pulling” it. This is why European toilets have a larger diameter trap way which results in less clogging.

One drawback of wash down toilets is the smaller water spot in the bowl, which can result in “skid marks” happening on occasion. So it really comes down to a matter of personal preference. If you are comfortable with getting out a plunger to unclog your toilet every now and again, then stick with an American style toilet. If you have issues with clogged toilets and don’t mind using a toilet brush every now and then an Australian or European style model may work better for you.

City Seeking Applicants For High Efficiency Toilet Program | Corpus Christi, TX | KZTV10.com |

City Seeking Applicants For High Efficiency Toilet Program | Corpus Christi, TX | KZTV10.com |.

CORPUS CHRISTI – The City of Corpus Christi is looking for residents who want a new toilet, at no cost to them, but are willing to cover the costs of installation.

The High Efficiency Toilet (HET) program will use federal stimulus funds to provide 2,000 new toilets to qualified applicants. The fixtures use 1.28 gallons per flush, rather than the high volume 3.5 gallon toilets used by most residents.

The funds come from a $2,757,500 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant awarded to the city from the U.S. Department of Energy.

Residents selected will receive a voucher in the mail during the first week of September that is good for one HET and all associated installation hardware. The voucher will also identify the date, time, and location for pick-up of the HET which is scheduled for early fall. Residents are responsible for all costs associated with having the fixtures installed.

The toilets replaced by residents will be picked up by the City’s Solid Waste Operations Department. The city says the porcelain fixtures will be crushed and used to restore oyster reefs in local bays in partnership with Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi and Haas Materials.

To participate, homeowners can complete an application form athttp://www.CorpusChristiHET.com or by calling toll free 1-855-242-5214. Spanish speaking operators are available.

Mail-in applications are also available at the Corpus Christi Water Department located at 2726 Holly Road, at the Utility Business Office at City Hall, 1201 Leopard Street, or at any of the City’s public libraries.

To take a look at the types of toilets offered in the program, check out www.caromausa.com.

Go Green & Stay Clean with Low Flow Shower Heads | Greener Ideal

Go Green & Stay Clean with Low Flow Shower Heads | Greener Ideal.

Go Green & Stay Clean with Low Flow Shower Heads

Posted by Ian Andrew on 2011-06-05 01:26:33

Caroma Low Flow Shower Head

For quite a long time, this is what I thought of when I heard about low flow shower heads:


That is, that they don’t give you enough pressure to even wash shampoo out of your hair. As funny as the running joke was through this Seinfeld episode, low flow shower head technology has evolved to a point where they can provide you with plenty of pressure, while still cutting down on your water consumption, and helping you save money and go green in the process.


How much water you can save

It may seem crazy, but up to 25% of your household’s total energy consumption can come just from hot water usage, with showers being the biggest contributor to that amount (approximately 15% of a household’s total energy consumption). While the efficiency of low flow shower heads can range, you can expect to save anywhere from 25% to 50% of the amount of water you’re using for every shower. For a 10 minute shower, that means saving anywhere from 10 gallons to 20 gallons. Depending on the type of energy you use to heat your water, this could save you up to $100 on energy costs every year.


Caroma Low Flow Showerhead full

The Pressure Question

Just like in the Seinfeld clip above, despite the amount of water saved, some may think a low flow showerhead simply doesn’t have enough pressure to justify making the switch. However, if you install a showerhead with multiple pressure settings like the new Flow showerhead made by Caroma, you can select whether you want more coverage, or stronger pressure in a narrower stream. Rest assured, you won’t have to worry about getting shampoo out of your hair.


Going green at home is easy

Thanks to great innovations, it has never been easier to make environmental choices at home that help you and your family go green, and still help your bottom line. This summer, take the initiative to make a few small changes to live a greener lifestyle – and why not start with a low flow showerhead? Most models are under $20 at your local hardware store, and can be installed on standard shower arms in under 5 minutes.

If you’ve had great success with saving energy with a low flow showerhead, recommend the product to us in the replies.

Caroma’s 2011 “One Flush Makes a Difference” Promotion – 50% off MSRP

http://www.caromausa.com/2011/02/09/2011_one_flush_makes_a_difference_50_off_promotion.php

2011 “One Flush Makes a Difference” Promotion

Caroma’s 50% off promotion is back! Last year’s promotion was a huge success and this year we’re once again inviting customers to receive a coupon for 50% off the list price of any qualifying Caroma toilet or sink at participating reseller locations*. The 2011 “One Flush Makes a Difference” promotion honors Earth Month and helps bring awareness to all that Caroma does to promote water-efficiency. You have until June 30, 2011 to participate in the promotion and receive 50 % off the list price of any qualifying Caroma toilet or sink.

Can One Flush Make a Difference?

Absolutely! In the United States federal law requires that new toilets must not exceed 1.6 gallons of water per flush (gpf). The high efficiency toilet (HET) category has set a standard in North America with 1.28 gallons per flush (gpf). Caroma’s HET’s go even further: The average flush of the toilets in Caroma’s standard collection is 1.06 gpf, while the Smart Series features an industry breaking 0.96 gpf!

Just think. If just one person uses a high efficiency toilet for one year then they will save around 330 gallons of water (based on the average three times a day flush). Further, if your toilet is from the 1980s, when new toilets were regulated to use 3.5 gallons of water per flush, you would save 2,410 gallons per year by switching to a HET toilet!

The numbers simply add up. If five people replaced their old 3.5 gpf toilet, over 12,000 gallons of water or the equivalent of 300 20-minute showers would be saved. One flush does make a difference, but if 2,000 people with new toilets switched to a HET toilet, in one year you would be able to fill an Olympic sized swimming pool with the water saved: 660,430 gallons! If 822 people using the old 3.5 gpf toilets changed to a Caroma HET toilet, we could fill an Olympic pool with the water saved!

Start Saving. Now you can save money and water at the same time with Caroma’s “One Flush Makes a Difference” 50% off promotion.

*Available through participating resellers only.
Excludes Invisi™ Series, Somerton Smart 270, Sydney Smart 305 One-Piece, Cube Ultra, H2 Zero Waterless and Flow Showerheads. Shipping not included. 50% discount is based off of the list price. Promotion runs from February 14, 2011 through June 30, 2011. Offer available to all North American residents (Canada exempt). Coupon must be present at time of purchase.
 

Click here to see Participating Dealers – if you are in Georgia, contact ecoTransitions.

All floor mounted models also qualify for the various toilet rebate programs in the US!

Pottygirl made it on the News flushing her potatoes: Road Warrior: Georgia Home, Garden Show

Road Warrior: Georgia Home, Garden Show.

pottygirl’s blogging year 2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads This blog is on fire!.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A helper monkey made this abstract painting, inspired by your stats.

The average container ship can carry about 4,500 containers. This blog was viewed about 16,000 times in 2010. If each view were a shipping container, your blog would have filled about 4 fully loaded ships.

 

In 2010, there were 90 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 198 posts. There was 1 picture uploaded, taking a total of 171kb.

The busiest day of the year was May 3rd with 93 views. The most popular post that day was Who’s To Blame For The Great Pacific Garbage Patch? Look In The Mirror..

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were en.wordpress.com, greenhomeguide.com, search.aol.com, linkedin.com, and google.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for penta water scam, caroma toilet reviews, the great pacific garbage patch facts, water conservation, and water scams exposed.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Who’s To Blame For The Great Pacific Garbage Patch? Look In The Mirror. September 2009
1 Like on WordPress.com,

2

10 drinking water scams exposed November 2009
1 comment

3

Toilet Rebate Programs in the US February 2009
5 comments

4

Caroma Toilet Review | H2O Report October 2009

5

City of Raleigh, NC WaterSense toilet replacement rebate program June 2010
2 comments