Australians Drop Their Pants to Protest Lack of Toilets

Australian beachgoers fed up with a lack of public toilet facilities on their local beaches came up with a very literal way to show their displeasure: by bringing their own toilets to the beach. On Sunday morning the dozen protesters, each dressed in top hats…

via Australians Drop Their Pants to Protest Lack of Toilets.

City of Thornton, CO rebates for water conservation

http://www.thorntonwater.com/

Toilet rebates are offered for the replacement of pre-1994 toilets for residential and commercial properties.  Effective January 1, 2012 toilet rebates will be $75 per WaterSense toilet and residential clothes washer rebates will be $100 per qualifying washer.

Population growth stirs worries about stress on region’s water supply | ajc.com

 

By Leon Stafford

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

When Colin Cavill began planning the 325-unit Enso Atlanta apartments near Grant Park three years ago, water was at the top of his mind.

Colin Cavill focused on water conservation when he developed the Enso Atlanta apartments in Grant Park, which, among other things, has a saltwater pool and a cistern for  rainwater harvesting that holds over 76,000 gallons.

Phil Skinner, AJC Colin Cavill focused on water conservation when he developed the Enso Atlanta apartments in Grant Park, which, among other things, has a saltwater pool and a cistern for rainwater harvesting that holds over 76,000 gallons.

 

Simply put: The metro’s area’s supply is limited, and he didn’t want to make matters worse.

So Cavill — who says his company, Capital 33, wanted to “help reduce our footprint” — developed the complex as a green project. Toilets and faucets are low-flow, shower heads are water-efficient, and a cistern collects water for the landscaping.

Cavill’s efforts may need to be become the norm as the state struggles with its limited water supply, experts say.

Metro Atlanta grew by 1 million people over the past decade, according to the U.S. census, and water — or lack thereof — could decide its continued strength as a region, the experts said.

“Growth goes where the water is and not vice versa,” said Gil Rogers, senior attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center.

Larry Neal, a senior principal for Mactec Engineering and Consulting, which has worked with the state on drinking water assessments, said a solution is critical for job growth. If water supply is stretched thin, it could be more expensive for business to tap. That could dissuade prospects from considering locating in metro Atlanta.

“If there is uncertainty,” he said, “it can cause a business to steer away. … You don’t want water to become the limiting factor in any given area.”

The state recognizes the risks. It has authorized the construction of reservoirs, created a Water Supply Task Force and adopted some conservation measures. Many cities and counties in the Metropolitan North Georgia Water Planning District, which includes metro Atlanta, are offering rebates to homeowners who replace older toilets with low-flow models.

One of the biggest challenges remains the state’s dispute with Alabama and Florida over access to Lake Lanier. U.S. District Judge Paul Magnuson ruled in 2009 that it was illegal for the Army Corps of Engineers to draw water from the lake to meet the needs of 3 million metro residents. Magnuson set a July 2012 deadline for the states to resolve the dispute. Otherwise, metro Atlanta would be limited to the same amount of water it received in the mid-1970s, when the population was less than one-third its current size. Georgia is appealing the ruling.

“Some of our issues are the litigation and uncertainty about the future,” said Pat Stevens, chief of environmental planning at the Atlanta Regional Commission.

Stevens said that despite the population growth, water use in metro Atlanta is down. She said the population in the North Georgia water district grew 28 percent between 2000 and 2009. Usage, however, was down to 512 million gallons of water a day in 2009, compared with a high in 2006 of 602 million gallons.

A number of factors led to the reduction, including conservation, severe water restrictions during several years of drought and the economic downturn, which may have forced residents to curtail tapping water they could not afford.

Also, 2009 was a rainy year, lessening the need to water yards and gardens.

“It really rained a lot that year. Actually the last year that was more close to our norm was in 2006,” Stevens said. The metro area’s rainfall was 69.4 inches in 2009 and 48.5 inches in 2006.

Alan Wexler, president of Databank Atlanta, a r, said if water were to become less abundant, it could lead to restrictions that would put commercial and residential real estate projects on hold. That happened in the years of drought in 2007 and 2008.

Solving the issue is critical because the economy has stymied real estate growth the past few years. When the recovery comes, no one wants to be sidelined because of water, he said.

“You have so many factors that are fluid right now,” he said.

Population growth stirs worries about stress on region’s water supply  | ajc.com.

Caroma continues American Forests support

Source Hotelnetwork.com

HILLSBORO, OREGON  -– Caroma, the leader in dual flush toilets and stylish bathroom sinks, is pleased to continue its support of American Forests and the environment by donating trees to the Ham Lake rehabilitation project in Superior National Forest in Minnesota.

On July 4, 1999 a windstorm caused 1000 square miles of blowdown, with the main path passing through the Gunflint Trail. The Gunflint Trail is a State of Minnesota scenic byway that bisects the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness and is historic because it follows Native American footpaths that are centuries old. It now serves a significant portion of Cook County residents and businesses. The area was struck again by disaster in May 2007 when the Ham Lake Fire occurred, the largest wildfire in the history of the Superior National Forest. Caroma is contributing to the planting of 134,000 red, white and Jack pine to benefit threatened, endangered, and sensitive species. This planting will be a part of Gunflint Green Up, which began in the summer of 2007 and involves public participation in reforesting after the fire. Volunteers included Girl Scout Troops, families, college students, senior citizens and friends and families of those who lost homes in the fire.

“We are pleased that Caroma continues to sponsor American Forests replanting programs,” states Deborah Gangloff, Executive Director of American Forests. “Their continued support of programs such as the Ham Lake rehabilitation project shows their concern for the environment and willingness to think beyond their primary business of water conservation. We look forward to their ongoing donations to environmental conservation.”

American Forests’ mission is to grow a healthier world with trees by working with communities on local efforts that restore and maintain forest ecosystems. Our work encompasses planting trees, calculating the value of urban forests, fostering environmental education, and improving public policy for trees at the national level. We have a goal of 100 million trees planted by 2020.

According to Derek Kirkpatrick, Caroma North America General Manager, “We are concerned with protecting the environment for our children and further into the future. Caroma promotes water conservation with high efficiency toilets and urinals, and we are extremely pleased to expand beyond water conservation by becoming a sponsor of American Forests and their environmental restoration programs.”

Toilet rebates flush with requests, but cash draining

Source National Post November 23, 2009, 4:30 PM by Jodie Shupac

The shift to all things green gains momentum, and certain cities are flush with requests for energy-efficient household alternatives.

Canada, BC: Langley Township toilet rebate program

The program offers $125 to residents who replace old, high-water-use toilets with high-efficiency dual-flush toilets.

Water plan ready for second round

Shared via AddThis

Caroma toilets offer a patented dual flush technology consisting of a 0.8 Gal flush for liquid waste and a 1.6 Gal flush for solids. Caroma, an Australian company set the standard by giving the world its first successful two button dual flush system in the nineteen eighties and has since perfected the technology. Also, with a full 3.5 ” trapway, these toilets virtually never clog. All of Caroma’s toilets are on the list of WaterSense labeled HET’s http://www.epa.gov/watersense/pp/find_het.htm and also qualify for several toilet rebate programs available in the US. Please visit my blog https://pottygirl.wordpress.com/ to learn more or go to http://www.caromausa.com to learn where you can find Caroma toilets locally. Visit http://www.ecotransitions.com/howto.asp to see how we flush potatoes with 0.8 gallons of water, meant for liquids only. Best regards, Andrea Paulinelli

The History of Plumbing Technology Throughout the Centuries

In present times most residents of the United Kingdom take properly working plumbing systems for granted. Most do not take the time to think about the history of plumbing or the way plumbing technology has evolved over time. Plumbing has a long and interesting history: a history that is worth exploring.

Plumbing first made its way into urban communities while the Romans and the Greeks were the powerful empires of the world. Plumbing was used by the Romans and Greeks for the public bathing houses that were so popular. Aqueducts came into fashion while the Romans were in power and they were used to carry clean water to the bathing houses and take the dirty water away. The Roman aqueduct system was used until the 1800s when advances in technology started a replacement process of the aqueducts by piping systems located underground.

In ancient times, the pipes were constructed mostly of lead while the aqueducts were constructed of clay or stone. This is a stark contrast to the plumbing materials used today. In present times copper, brass, steel or even plastic are the most popular construction materials for pipes and plumbing systems. Lead has been discontinued permanently because it has a high toxicity level.

The bath houses that the Romans enjoyed are considered the predecessors of plumbing as it currently exists. Originally, public bathing only occurred while the sun was up because the bath water was only replaced once each day. Remember, it was not until long after the Roman Empire fell that bacterium was discovered and the western world learned how diseases were spread with the obvious implications on bathing and personal hygiene. In Roman times, one water change each day was all they thought they needed.

Perhaps more important than the public baths and aqueducts, though, is the evolution of the modern toilet. The toilet that is so familiar to the modern western world was first invented around 2800 BC in Mohenjo-Darco and was made from a seat placed upon a pile of bricks. In those times only the highest class of society was allowed to use the toilet. It was not until the middle of the nineteenth century that the western world adopted the sit-down toilet that was popular with the ancient Romans.

As the western world adopted the plumbing and toilet structures that were invented in Roman times the technology surrounding the systems exploded in volume and size. In less than one hundred years the western world helped toilets and plumbing fixtures advance from aqueducts and sit down holes to the sophisticated and technically complex modern marvels that western people now take for granted.

Today plumbing technology places pipes underground and the open sewage drains and cesspools associated with the aqueducts are mostly gone. Plumbing technology, along with the other marvels of the modern world, continues to increase in cleanliness and efficiency.

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