Cost of Dual Flush Toilets – Material pricing and labor cost calculator

Source: http://www.homewyse.com/costs/cost_of_dual_flush_toilets.html#.TkZXouxq_mQ.facebook

July 2011

Do you need to know the range of average installed costs for Dual Flush Toilets in your zip code? Do you need an independent, 2011 cost breakdown of Dual Flush Toilet material and installation costs?

The Homewyse Dual Flush Toilet cost estimator provides up to date pricing information for your neighborhood. Enter your zip code, the size of your project below and click “Update”. The table below summarizes the average 2011 cost to install Dual Flush Toilets in your area for good, better and custom quality work.

Dual Flush Toilet Costs zip code units
Basic Better Best
Dual Flush Toilet Prices (Material Only) $195 – $260 $251 – $326 $317 – $382
Dual Flush Toilet Installation Cost $45 – $72 $67 – $95 $89 – $124
Dual Flush Toilet – Total $239 – $333 $318 – $421 $406 – $506
Dual Flush Toilet Average Cost per unit $286.05 $369.50 $455.91
  • In most situations, you will want to have Dual Flush Toilet installation completed by a Plumber. Use the free Homewyse checklist for effective, objective advice in finding, hiring and managing a capable and trustworthyPlumber. Avoid common problems and get quality work at a fair price.
  • You may want to consider having the Dual Flush Toilet installation completed by a Plumbing Contractor. But – do your homework to minimize common risks. Make sure that your Plumbing Contractor has relevant Dual Flush Toilet experience, that you verify past work, and that you follow the homewyse checklist to find and hire a capable service professional.
  • Avoid costly warranty and maintenance problems for your Dual Flush Toilet – insist that all work to be performed with proper installation techniques and materials. Use the homewyse Toilet Installation checklists to make sure important functional and aesthetic details are completed properly.

Dual Flush Toilets – Pricing and Installation Cost Notes

  • The homewyse cost estimates includes all typical costs for toilet, wax ring, toilet seat and plumbing supply connection.
  • The homewyse installation cost estimate does not include costs for repair or modification of existing subfloor, or location of drain or water connections.
  • Higher priced Dual Flush Toilets may include features such as designer styles, wider range of colors and advanced flushing capabilities.
  • Dual Flush Toilet installation costs are commonly quoted from a standard rate and can be estimated by the service professional with inspecting the job site.
  • Save money on the total project by having multiple vendors bid on the same, complete description of Dual Flush Toilet work for your project.
  • Save money on installation costs by being flexible on project scheduling and be willing to complete your work during slow periods for the service provider.
  • Save money by shopping online or by choosing discountinued, odd lot, remnant or incorrectly ordered items from your retailer.

International Code Council World Toilet Summit

via International Code Council World Toilet Summit.

International Code Council World Toilet Summit 

The first ever U.S. International Code Council World Toilet Summit

Hosted by the American Society of Plumbing Engineers
Convention and Engineered Plumbing Exposition
October 30 – November 3, 2010
Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia

Learn about

  • This virtually untapped sanitation market
  • The best ways to reach 2.6 billion potential customers
  • That most of this massive consumer base have dispensable incomes
  • How you can help save lives while generating huge profits

The World Toilet Summit has always attracted key global leaders in the sanitation and water arena. But never before has this outstanding event that focuses on innovations and business opportunities in this life-critical area taken place in the United States…until now.

Two-for-One Event

The International Code Council is proud to partner with the World Toilet Organization on this landmark global event that is being hosted by ASPE during their Convention and Engineered Plumbing Exposition (EPE). With seven combined ASPE and ICC WTS tracks, over 300 exhibitors, and multiple networking and social events, this first ever U.S. ICC WTS and ASPE Convention offers two conferences for the price of one.

Schedule of Activities

Saturday, October 30

  • ASPE will hold member meetings and other member-centric activities

Sunday, October 31

  • Convention Opening Welcome Party begins at 7pm at the National Constitution Center

Monday, November 1

  • International Breakfast – 8:00 – 10:00 a.m.
  • International Code Council overview – 10:00 – 11:15 a.m.
  • Engineered Plumbing Exposition – 11:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
  • Exhibitor hospitality receptions – begin at 6:30 p.m.

Tuesday, November 2

  • WTS & ASPE sessions – 8:30 – 11:15 a.m.
  • Engineered Plumbing Exposition continues – 11:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • WTS & ASPE sessions continue – 3:45 – 5:00 p.m.
  • ASPE & ICC WTS Banquet begins at 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday, November 3

  • WTS & ASPE sessions – 8:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
  • Key WTS topic discussion and demonstration (specific topic TBD)

Profit While Helping Others

The global sanitation crisis takes the life of a child every 15 seconds. Nearly 40% of the world’s population has no access to proper sanitation. This marketplace of 2.6 billion potential sanitation consumers need the help of plumbing professionals to eradicate these horrific statistics.

While altruism is wonderful, there are also huge profits to be made for those who engage in developing and delivering sanitation products and services to the developing world. It is a startling, but true fact that the poor have been buying more hand phones than toilets, which is causing the developed world to realize that there is a tremendous market for goods and services at the bottom of the economic pyramid. The purchasing power of the poor has been increasing with the availability of improved access to financing, as well as better market data that results in fairer prices for products.

This not-to-be-missed conference will give you everything you need to know to start capturing a share of the international sanitation market while helping to improve conditions for the 40% of the world’s population who have no access to proper sanitation.

Click on the links in the menu of choices on the right side of the page for more conference details.

Click here to learn more about the World Toilet Organization (WTO) and their efforts to provide toilets and safe sanitation worldwide.

To learn more, contact the ICC’s PMG Resource Center at 1-888

Caroma on the Today show!

Caroma’s Profile Smart and Sydney Smart™ appeared on NBC’s TODAY Show Monday, March 29, 2010. Green Gadget Guy, Steve Greenberg demonstrated Caroma’s dual flush capabilities by flushing a large potato and two limes with the half flush (0.8 gallons)!

http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/26184891/vp/36082618#36082618

Sales Tax holiday in Georgia October 1-4, 2009

October 1-4, 2009

A culture of conservation is growing in Georgia.

We are responsible for the stewardship of our state’s natural resources. Incorporating energy and water conservation practices into our daily lives benefits everyone in our state now and for generations to come. And small changes can make a big impact in our pocketbooks. To help make those changes a little easier, Georgia is offering the ENERGY STAR® and WaterSense® Sales Tax Holiday, Oct. 1-4, 2009.

During the sales tax holiday, you can purchase ENERGY STAR-qualified or WaterSense-labeled products up to $1,500 without paying sales tax. In addition to the up-front cost savings, purchasing and installing more-efficient appliances and products can reduce in-home utility costs and improve both energy and water conservation.

 

ENERGY STAR®

ENERGY STAR products meet strict energy efficiency guidelines set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy. These appliances, electronics and lighting operate while using less energy – and less money – than older models.

Americans, with the help of ENERGY STAR, prevented 43 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions in 2008 alone – equivalent to the annual emissions from 29 million vehicles – and saved more than $19 million on their utility bills. By looking to ENERGY STAR for best practices and products, households can reduce their energy use and save about one-third, or $750 annually, on their utility bills, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

 

WaterSense®

WaterSense, a national program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, makes it easy to find water-efficient products. Toilets, faucets and other products that are independently certified to meet U.S. EPA criteria for water effi­ciency and performance can earn the label.Look for WaterSense labeled products

The average household spends as much as $500 per year on its water and sewer bill. By installing WaterSense-labeled fixtures and ENERGY STAR-qualified appliances that use water more efficiently, a household could save about $170 per year. If just one out of every four households in Georgia retrofit their bathrooms with WaterSense-labeled fixtures, it could save nearly 10 billion gallons of water per year – enough for every Georgian to take a shower daily for about two months.

For more information on ENERGY STAR, please visit http://www.gefa.org/Index.aspx?page=352

For more information on WaterSense, please visit http://www.conservewatergeorgia.net/documents/ waterSense_taxHoliday.html

The drought is officially over. We can go back to our old ways…

The drought is over. 

That’s the word from Georgia’s top environmental officials. After years of water restrictions and conservation programs, water levels across the state appear to be getting back to normal.

The state climatologist says Georgia experienced the wettest spring season on record in 115 years.  In fact, Governor Sonny Perdue says heavy rainfall in recent months helped the entire state emerge from the worst drought categories, prompting restrictions on outdoor water use to be lifted for the first time since 2006. 

So, should we still conserve water? Absolutely.

Why should we conserve water?

 There are many good reasons to conserve water.

Water conservation can help meet future needs.

Water is a precious resource – our lives depend on it. In Georgia, the average consumption (residential, commercial and industrial, not agricultural) is 168 gallons per day, 10% higher than the national average of 153 gallons a day. An adult needs less than a gallon per day for drinking purposes, but 101 gallons per day are used in residential applications.

(Source: http://www.p2ad.org/files_pdf/cwmbs.pdf

Georgia’s population growth is among the most rapid in the nation. In the last decade, the state’s population has increased by more than 1.7 million. If current trends continue, Georgia’s population will reach 11.9 million in 2025. A doubling of demand for water over the next twenty years is highly probable. Given that drought-prone Georgia already uses a relatively high share of its land for residential purposes, future population growth will have a meaningful impact upon the supply of fresh water. As more and more faucets drain the aquifers, or underground reservoirs, urban sprawl paves over the land and short-circuits its absorption properties. Georgia’s fast-growing cities face water shortages by 2020 unless local utilities find new supplies.

Saving water will save you money.

Conserving water saves you money! Not only will your water bill go down, but as you heat less water, your gas or energy bill will also decline. If your whole community conserves, you will also pay less fees for water-related services. Water conserving communities will not need to pay as much to develop new supplies and expand or upgrade water and wastewater infrastructure.

 The City of Atlanta has approved a 12.5% rate increase effective July 1, 2009 and another 12% increase in 2010.  

Approved Water and Sewer Rates City of Atlanta

Water conservation helps preserve the environment.

Quite simply, water is the essential component of all life. It comprises 70% of the Earth’s surface and 75% of the human body. Of that 70% of surface water, only 1% is actually drinkable. Water is needed to keep the ecosystem in balance. Clouds need water to make rain. Plants need water to grow. Animals depend on plants for the oxygen they produce and the food they provide. When one element of the chain is compromised, the entire system is thrown out of whack. Roughly 46% of America’s lakes are too polluted for fishing, swimming or hosting aquatic life. 1.2 trillion gallons of untreated sewage, storm water, and industrial waste are discharged into US waters annually.

 There are many obvious reasons for us to protect our water supply, but the most important point to remember is that water is absolutely essential to all living things. Educate yourself, dedicate yourself, and you can make a difference.

(Source: http://www.luminant.com/scholar/docs/EnvironmentWater.pdf)

A significant level of water conservation can be achieved without major changes in lifestyle. Simply watering landscapes properly and utilizing efficient plumbing fixtures and appliances in the home can reduce the per-capita water use by 25 percent.

Is a rainwater collecting system a good investment?

I  have permission to share an interesting article, written by Bob Drew, owner of ECOVIE Rainwater Collection Systems

Well, we’ve had 3 straight months of above average rainfall.  If June is also above normal, the drought will be declared over and the watering ban may be lifted.  But, we are now moving into the drier months and it is possible we will remain under watering restrictions.   Even so, one may wonder what normal Atlanta rainfall conditions mean with regard to the benefits of a rainwater collection system.  Rainwater collection systems in the form of multi-thousand gallon tanks and cisterns are popping up all over metro Atlanta in response to the lower than average rainfall and low Lake Lanier levels the last 3 years.  Are these systems still a good investment if there are no watering restrictions and rainfall is normal?  The answer is yes.  In fact, some of the reasons for having a rainwater collection system for your home actually become more important when it rains more.  Consider that:

  1.  With no watering ban, we can once again water turf and gardens with our automatic irrigation systems.  Feeding these systems with city water can cost hundreds of dollars per month.  Feeding your irrigation with rainwater is nearly free and will definitely save you money.
  2. Even under normal rainfall conditions, we will likely experience several periods of more than 10 days without appreciable rain this summer.  A rainwater collection system bridges across these periods to keep your lawn and garden lush and vibrant.   Even though rain itself nourishes our lawns and gardens, we will still need to water to keep plants at their optimal best.
  3. When it rains a lot, rainwater collection systems prevent heavy erosion and storm water runoff problems.  By collecting water and using it later, soils can better soak up water and replenish the ground water supply.  For those who think drilling a well is the answer, keep in mind that irrigating with well water has a net negative effect on ground water supply.
  4. The possibility of using rainwater year around for indoor uses such as laundering and toilet flushing becomes much more attractive the more it rains.  With additional filtration and UV disinfection, the Georgia Plumbing Code allows use of rainwater indoors for non-potable uses.  The typical family of four uses around 50,000 gallons per year for these uses, so the cost savings and other benefits can be substantial. 

And whether there’s a drought or not, collecting rainwater is a smart choice to help alleviate Atlanta’s ongoing water supply challenges.  This may be as good a time as ever to consider rainwater collection to protect your landscape investment use less city water.

Save Water, Save A Buck

About Save Water, Save A Buck

Save Water, Save a Buck is a rebate program in Southern California that offers cash rebates on a wide variety of water-saving technologies. Devices available for rebates include High-Efficiency and Ultra Low Flush Toilets, High-Efficiency and Zero Water Urinals, food services equipment such as Pre-Rinse Spray Heads and Connectionless Food Steamers, HVAC equipment such as Cooling Tower and pH Conductivity Controllers, cleaning equipment such as High-Efficiency Clothes Washers and Pressurized Waterbrooms and medical equipment like X-Ray Film Processor Recirculation Systems, Steam Sterilizer Retrofits and Dry-Vacuum Pumps.

Through MWD’s Save Water, Save A Buck Program, Southern California businesses are eligible for generous rebates to help encourage water efficiency and conservation.

The program also offers rebates on outdoor landscaping equipment such as weather based “smart” irrigation controllers, rotating spray nozzle retrofits for pop-up spray heads, high efficiency nozzle retrofits for large rotary sprinklers and synthetic turf.

As the drought is worsening and the water levels at Lake Lanier declining, it may be time for a program like Save Water, Save a Buck ibaby treefrog born in our back yardn Georgia. Not only will we save millions of gallons of drinking water and money each day, we will also help our economy. Plumbers will have work, Manufacturers will start hiring again and we will feel good about doing something ” kind” to our world in these tough times. Please read the Mission Statement as well as a lot more interesting information about Water efficiency and Water Recycling here.

As a Small Business, but nevertheless largest Supplier for Caroma Dual Flush toilets in Georgia, I am a proud to notice that the list of eligible High Efficiency Toilets (HET’s)  includes the follwing models

  1. 46 manufactured by Caroma Industries
  2. 20 made by Toto
  3. 19 made by Crane
  4. 17 made by American Standard
  5. 12 mady by Kohler
  6. 11 made by Mansfield
  7. 9 made by Zurn

and several made by various manufactures such as Aquasource, Briggs, Cascadian, Foremost, Gerber, Glacier Bay, Greentide, Jacuzzi, Niagara, OPS, Pegasus (a Home Depot brand), Proflow (a Ferguson brand), Quality Craft, Seasons (a HD Supply brand), Sterling (a Kohler company), Tangshan Ayers Bath, Tynan, Vitra, Vortens and Wateridge.

h2zero_3

Furthering an ongoing commitment to products that conserve water, Caroma has recently introduced the H2Zero™ Waterless Urinal in the US. The vitreous china urinal incorporates unique cartridge technology that operates with zero water for optimum performance and water conservation. Another model, the Leda urinal uses only 0.48 gallons per flush while the Cube 3 Ultra uses a remarkable 0.15 gallons per flush, or a mere pint of water. Thanks to its innovative design and technology, the Cube 3 Ultra was named one of the Top 10 green building products of 2007 by GreenSpec.

All eligible toilets are included on the list of WaterSense labeled High Efficiency toilets, which is updated regularly on EPA’s WaterSense program site. Since I became a WaterSense partner in Georgia beginning of 2008, the list of Watersense labeled toilets grew from 115 models on 11/29/07 to 249 models on 12/15/08.

Find out more about Caroma toilets at ttp://www.caromausa.com or http://www.ecoTransitions.com. To see why they work so well, please visit us on YouTube.

The History of Plumbing Technology Throughout the Centuries

In present times most residents of the United Kingdom take properly working plumbing systems for granted. Most do not take the time to think about the history of plumbing or the way plumbing technology has evolved over time. Plumbing has a long and interesting history: a history that is worth exploring.

Plumbing first made its way into urban communities while the Romans and the Greeks were the powerful empires of the world. Plumbing was used by the Romans and Greeks for the public bathing houses that were so popular. Aqueducts came into fashion while the Romans were in power and they were used to carry clean water to the bathing houses and take the dirty water away. The Roman aqueduct system was used until the 1800s when advances in technology started a replacement process of the aqueducts by piping systems located underground.

In ancient times, the pipes were constructed mostly of lead while the aqueducts were constructed of clay or stone. This is a stark contrast to the plumbing materials used today. In present times copper, brass, steel or even plastic are the most popular construction materials for pipes and plumbing systems. Lead has been discontinued permanently because it has a high toxicity level.

The bath houses that the Romans enjoyed are considered the predecessors of plumbing as it currently exists. Originally, public bathing only occurred while the sun was up because the bath water was only replaced once each day. Remember, it was not until long after the Roman Empire fell that bacterium was discovered and the western world learned how diseases were spread with the obvious implications on bathing and personal hygiene. In Roman times, one water change each day was all they thought they needed.

Perhaps more important than the public baths and aqueducts, though, is the evolution of the modern toilet. The toilet that is so familiar to the modern western world was first invented around 2800 BC in Mohenjo-Darco and was made from a seat placed upon a pile of bricks. In those times only the highest class of society was allowed to use the toilet. It was not until the middle of the nineteenth century that the western world adopted the sit-down toilet that was popular with the ancient Romans.

As the western world adopted the plumbing and toilet structures that were invented in Roman times the technology surrounding the systems exploded in volume and size. In less than one hundred years the western world helped toilets and plumbing fixtures advance from aqueducts and sit down holes to the sophisticated and technically complex modern marvels that western people now take for granted.

Today plumbing technology places pipes underground and the open sewage drains and cesspools associated with the aqueducts are mostly gone. Plumbing technology, along with the other marvels of the modern world, continues to increase in cleanliness and efficiency.

About the Author:

World Toilet Day, November 19, 2008

 On November 19, 2008 was World Toilet Day, a day on which the world was reminded that more than 2.6 billion people (including 980 million children) – over 40% of the world’s population – still have no access to basic sanitation. Of these, more than 1 billion live without access to any kind of toilet at all and are forced to defecate in the open. Basic sanitation is something that we often take for granted in developed countries.

Lack of sanitation is one of the main causes of sickness, disease and infant death in developing countries. Around 4,000 people, mostly children, die every day as a result of diarrhea-related illnesses, caused in part by unsafe water and a lack of access to basic sanitation facilities. The World Health Organisation estimates that improved sanitation reduces diarrhea morbidity by 32%.

When the London-based journalist Rose George wrote a book on human waste, toilets and the world sanitation crisis, she knew that she’d be the butt of a few jokes around the pub. What she didn’t realize — at least not fully — was just how important her subject was. George’s new book The Big Necessity: The Unmentionable World of Human Waste and Why It Matters delves into the taboo subject of bowel evacuation, with tact, sensitivity — and the right amount of style. Reporting on the sewers of London and the slums of New Delhi and the high-tech toilets of Tokyo, George comes to understand that sanitation is no laughing matter — it’s the difference between life and death. “I thought a toilet was my right,” writes George in the book’s introduction. “It was a privilege.”

Toilets are a privilege that nearly half the world lacks. That doesn’t just mean that they don’t have a nice, heated indoor bathroom. It means they have nothing — not a public toilet, not an outhouse, not even a bucket. They defecate in public, contaminating food and drinking water, and the disease toll due to unsanitized human waste is staggering. George notes that 80% of the world’s illnesses are caused by fecal matter: A single gram of feces can contain 10 million viruses, 1 million bacteria, 1,000 parasitic cysts and 100 worm eggs. According to the estimates of one sanitation specialist George cites, each of the 2.6 billion people who live without sanitation may ingest up to 10 grams of fecal matter a day. The consequence is often diarrhea, which is a mere irritation in the West, but in the developing world a lethal condition that kills 2.2 million people a year — more than AIDS, tuberculosis or malaria.

Jack Sim is the founder of the World Toilet Organization, otherwise known as the other WTO http://www.worldtoilet.org. Sim, a retired Singaporean entrepreneur, built the WTO from a group of one — himself — to a sprawling network of 151 organizations in 53 countries. Among his innovations is World Toilet Day, this Nov. 19, which is meant to publicize the plight of billions of people who go without toilets and fight the taboo that nearly all cultures have about business in the bathroom. That quiet embarrassment — similar to the hush around sexual practices that once muffled AIDS activism — keeps sanitation out of the world’s top health priorities, and ensures that even those who go without toilets suffer in silence.

Read the full story here http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1859878,00.html?iid=perma_share

Sources

http://www.dfid.gov.uk/news/files/world-toilet-day-08.asp

http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1859878,00.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What you should know about toilets

Toilets account for almost 30% of residential indoor water use in the United States.

Toilets are also a major source of wasted water due to leaks and inefficiency. In a home that was built prior to 1993 it is most likely that the toilet uses 3.5 gallons or more for every single flush (in Dekalb County alone, approx. 165,000 homes were built prior to 1993 – there are approx. 1 Mio. Homes in the Greater Atlanta area that still have old, inefficient toilets in use). Experts say that the minimum needed to meet the basic human needs of drinking, cooking and hygiene is five gallons of clean water per person per day. It’s far from enough to ensure health and well-being-just enough to get by. Do we really need to flush down that much each time we go “Number One”?

In the beginning of modern toilets there was the seven-gallon flushing porcelain lavatory. Then there was the low-flush toilet. And by the time you’d flushed several times the bowl was “clear” and you had flushed more water than you did with the faithful lavatory.

Then there was the new and improved low-flush toilet, which was better but still not what always got the job done. And finally, the High-Efficiency toilet arrived; you now have your choice of flushing as little as .8 gallons with dual flush toilets. The best part is that they really work!

What Are High-Efficiency Toilets?

Under federal law, toilets must not exceed 1.6 gallons per flush (gpf). High-efficiency toilets (HETs) go beyond the standard and use less than 1.3 gpf. The WaterSense label will be used on HETs that are certified by independent laboratory testing to meet rigorous criteria for both performance and efficiency. Only HETs that complete the third-party certification process can earn the WaterSense label.

 Do High Efficiency Toilets Work?

Everyone is concerned about the performance of low-flow toilets. Do they clear the bowl and leave it clean? Do they stop up frequently? Unlike the first 1.6 gallon / flush toilets, WaterSense HETs combine high efficiency with high performance. Advances in toilet design permit WaterSense HETs to save water without loss of flushing power. In fact, many perform better than standard toilets in consumer testing. Want proof? Watch this amazing video of Eddie Wilcut, the Water Conservation Manager for the City of San Antonio, flushing a Russet potato down a Caroma toilet with the full flush (1.6 gallon) AND half flush (0.8 gallon), which is meant for liquid waste.

How Much Water and Money Do HETs Save?

High efficiency toilets save you money by reducing your water and wastewater costs. Over the course of a lifetime, an average person flushes the toilet nearly 140,000 times. If you install a WaterSense HET, you can save 4,000 gallons per year and your children can each save about a third of a million gallons during their lifetime. If a family of four replaces one 3.5 gpf toilet made between 1980 and 1994 with a WaterSense toilet, they can save $2,000 over the lifetime of the toilet. If the toilet being replaced was made before 1980, it uses 5 gallons per flush so the savings will be much greater. If you’d like to calculate how much water you can save try the water savings calculator on www.ecotransitions.com.

With these savings, new high-efficiency toilets can pay for themselves in only a few years. Even better, many local utilities offer substantial rebates for replacing old toilets with HETs. Detailed information on the rebates available in Georgia can be found here Rebates in Georgia

What are Dual Flush toilets?

Dual flush toilets offer a patented dual flush technology consisting of a 0.8 Gal flush for liquid waste and a 1.6 Gal flush for solids. They can save up to 40% (approx. 4600 gallons) compared to today’s standard 1.6-gallon single flush toilets. On an average of 4/1 uses a day,  Dual Flush toilets have the lowest water consumption of all – 0.96 Gallons per flush. Caroma, an Australian manufacturer that invented the Dual Flush technology manufactures award winning toilets that are both user friendly and, with a full 3.5″ trap way, virtually blockage-free!  Wouldn’t that be nice to be able to finally kiss the plunger good bye? Beware of some products reducing the amount of water flushed to use with your existing toilet. Existing bowls are not designed to perform with reduced amounts of water, so the likelihood of clogging your toilet while you are trying to flush paper and solid waste increases drastically.

Select a WaterSense Labeled High-Efficiency Toilet!look for watersense label

Whether you are remodeling a bathroom, beginning construction of a new house, or just want to replace an old, leaky toilet, a WaterSense labeled HET is your best bet. Look for the WaterSense label on any toilet you buy. If every home in the United States replaced just one old toilet with a new HET, we would save almost one trillion (spelled with a T)

gallons of water per year, equal to more than two weeks of the water flowing over Niagara Falls!

Note that some manufacturers offer high-efficiency and ordinary models with very similar names, so be sure and look for the WaterSense label. A list of WaterSense labeled High-Efficiency Toilets can be found here List of WaterSense labeled HET’s published by the EPA.

Where can I find a HET?

To find WaterSense partners and resources in your area, please follow the link and click on your state below or choose from the list that follows. EPA – Where you live

For a watersavings calculator and more information on Dual Flush toilets please visit www.ecotransitions.com.

WaterSense Partners helped save 277 million gallons of water in 2007

San Antonio Water System gives away 20,000 free Caroma Dual Flush toilets

Perhaps the City of Atlanta should consider this. San Antonio has implemented an incredible program, resulting in tremendous water savings PLUS lots of business for plumbers. Read full article here 

http://www.reevesjournal.com/CDA/Articles/Cover_Story/BNP_GUID_9-5-2006_A_10000000000000283282