Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels | Green Lodging News

Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels | Green Lodging News.

Source: Green Lodging News

Drury Hotels Chooses Caroma Dual Flush Toilets for Seven Hotels

 

 

5/6/2009

 

HILLSBORO, ORE.—Drury Hotels, a 100 percent family owned and operated mid-scale hotel company, has chosen Caroma, a leader in dual flush toilets, to supply water-saving toilets to seven hotels in the Drury chain, including the Drury Inn and Suites, Pear Tree Inn, and the Drury Plaza. This includes three retrofit projects (one in 2007 and two completed in early 2009) to replace older, higher water usage toilets and four new constructions (one in 2008 and 2009 and two in 2010).

Caroma’s first installation with Drury Hotels in 2007 was part of San Antonio Water System’s commercial toilet retrofit program at the Pear Tree Inn, San Antonio, Texas. As a result of high efficiency dual flush toilets and low flow showerheads being installed, the water consumption reduced by an average of 50 percent from 2006 to 2009 for the same three-month period. The impressive results in water savings and performance are now being experienced in other Drury Hotels in San Antonio as well as Flagstaff, Ariz., and in hotels opening during 2009 and 2010 in Phoenix, Wichita, Kan., and San Antonio.

Caroma was chosen as the dual flush toilet provider to help maximize water savings in the bathrooms. The Sydney Smart range was installed during two retrofit projects in early 2009. The Sydney Smart features a 1.28 gallon full flush button for solid waste and 0.8 gallon half flush option for liquid and paper waste, averaging just 0.9 gallons per flush. This saves nearly 44 percent more water compared to the nationally-mandated 1.6 gallon toilet. Assuming an average of 125 rooms with a 70 percent occupancy rate and eight flushes per room, one Drury hotel can save more than 664,000 gallons of water annually compared to a 3.5 gallon toilet and 178,000 gallons compared to a single flush 1.6 gallon toilet. The Sydney range installed in two earlier hotel projects use 1.6 gallons per flush for solid waste and 0.8 gallons per flush for liquid and paper waste, averaging only 0.96 gallons per flush based on a 1:4 full/half flush ratio.

Water Expenses Reduced

“Our focus at Drury Hotels is ensuring that our guests receive quality and consistency at a good value,” says Gregg Mrzlak, mechanical project manager from Drury Southwest, Inc. “We are also very aware of the drought conditions throughout the Southwest, and by using Caroma water-conserving toilets, we are able to save considerable water each year and reduce our water costs. A great added benefit by using Caroma is a reduction in maintenance due to blockages being eliminated. We have been very pleased with the dual flush toilets and will be using them in future retrofits and new installations where possible.”

“The Caroma dual flush toilets have been a great addition to our hotels because they reduce hotel water costs considerably each year and reduce the burden on San Antonio’s water systems,” says Danielle Poyner, LEED AP for Drury Southwest, Inc. “In addition to these benefits, the toilets have also contributed to Drury Hotels earning LEED Certification at the Drury Inn & Suites in Flagstaff and for hotels seeking LEED certification that will be opening soon, including Drury Inn & Suites La Cantera in San Antonio, Texas, Drury Inn & Suites in Phoenix, and Drury Plaza in Wichita, Kan.”

“In addition to the substantial water savings experienced at the Pear Tree Inn, we have reduced the number of clogs from three to five per week prior to Caroma toilets being installed to zero clogs in more than two years,” explains Aaron Francisco, property manager at Pear Tree Inn, San Antonio. “Our customers like the fact that we are helping conserve water, but also that the toilets look very modern. We didn’t have to sacrifice style for water conservation.”

Go to Caroma.

Plunger or Brush?

During my very first visit to the US (during my honeymoon, to be precise) I had my very first, very embarrassing experience with a plunger. After all, it happened at my mother-in-law’s house. As it happened again at a hotel in Las Vegas a few years later, I still didn’t understand why I clog a toilet in the US, but never have before in Germany.

I moved to the US many years later and bought an older home. As the drought in Georgia worsened in 2007, I noticed that the toilets in our home used 3.5 gallons for each flush. I started looking around in home improvement stores and was stunned that all toilets available used 1.6 gallons for each flush. As toilets with the option of using very little water for flushing No. 1 have been available in Germany  for a very long time, I could not believe I couldn’t find them here. So after much research, I finally found Caroma Dual Flush toilets and decided to spread the word and help Georgians flushing less water and money down the toilet. After I learned why Caroma toilets work so well with very little water, I realized why American toilets clog. So finally, 16 years later I realized that there was nothing wrong with me, or my diet, that I clogged a toilet on my honeymoon!

Standard US toilets clear the bowl with siphon technology, so the waste in the bowl gets pulled into the drain and out into the trap way. In order to create this siphon action, the trap way needs to be as narrow as possible, usually around 2 to 2 3/4 inches. You can see how siphon vs. washdown technology works here

Although most of the time this flushing method gets rid of the waste efficiently, there is a tendency for blockages to occur in the toilet trap way.

Australian and European designed toilets use a wash down method which “pushes” the waste down, instead of “pulling” it. This is why European toilets have a larger diameter trap way which results in less clogging.

One drawback of wash down toilets is the smaller water spot in the bowl, which can result in “skid marks” happening on occasion. So it really comes down to a matter of personal preference. If you are comfortable with getting out a plunger to unclog your toilet every now and again, then stick with an American style toilet. If you have issues with clogged toilets and don’t mind using a toilet brush every now and then an Australian or European style model may work better for you.

Redlands, CA toilet rebate

http://cityofredlands.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/MUED/Water%20Conservation/RebateApplication.pdf

New Tecumseth, CAN toilet rebate program

Source: http://www.simcoe.com/news/article/1419299–new-tec-offers-rebates-for-using-less-water

New Tec offers rebates for using less water

NEW TECUMSETH – New Tecumseth is offering a little incentive for residents looking to reduce their water use.

To help offset the cost of replacing high water consumption toilets with low flush toilets, the town is offering a $50 rebate per toilet. For residents buying a rain barrel, the town is offering a rebate of 50 per cent of the cost of the barrel (to a maximum of $50).

By installing an EcoEnergy low flush toilet, the town says people can help the environment by reducing water consumption and save money on your water bill. Rainwater collected through outdoor rain barrels can be used to water your lawn and flower garden or washing the car.

Each residence is eligible for two EcoEnergy toilets and one rain barrel for the first year of the Ministry of Environment-mandated program.

Rebate forms are available online at http://www.town.newtecumseth.on.ca/TownHall/WaterConservation/index.htm or by calling 905-729-1270 ext. 432.

Venice, FL toilet rebate program

Living Green: Venice toilet rebate program.

Living Green: Venice toilet rebate program

Reported by: Scott Dennis
Email: sdennis@mysuncoast.com
Last Update: 7/24 6:09 pm

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VENICE – You may have some water hogs inside your home and not even know it.  Older toilets can use three or more gallons per flush.  New models or low flow toilets, use only 1.6 gallons or less.  That can really add up over time and there’s no excuse now not to replace those water hogs if you live in the City of Venice.

The “City on the Gulf” is offering an opportunity to save the water that fills this tower and to keep your hard earned money from being flushed down the toilet.

Venice now offering a rebate of up to $100 to replace an older, high flow toilet that needs at least three gallons per flush.  There’s a limit of two per customer.  The city’s Utilities Director says there’s a big need for this rebate program.
“We’ve got a lot of old, high flow fixtures out there. Venice is an older city, Sarasota is too, but in Venice, we’re trying to encourage folks to look for additional ways to curb their water use, either now over over time,” says Len Bramble, Venice Director of Utilities.

Our toilets tend to last a long time.  All we have to do is occasionally replace the components inside to keep it flushing for years, even decades.  But here’s an incentive that will help you save water and pay less on your utility bill for years to come.  “Think about it over the course of a month or a year, or five years or ten years. Most of us keep those fixtures for a long time,” says Bramble.

Don’t forget, there are also dual flush toilets available now that use even less water for number one.  For more information on the City of Venice’s toilet replacement rebate program, visit the city’s website.

Other Suncoast communities have similar programs.  Check with your local government.

Oregon, WI offers toilet rebate

Toilet Rebate Program

Toilet flushing uses more water than any other household fixture.

Replace your old water guzzling toilet with an EPA WaterSense Toilet and Reap the Cost Savings Rewards!

Oregon Water & Sewer Utility is offering a $50.00 rebate to people who replce a high-volume toilet with a High-Efficiency EPA WaterSense Toilet that uses 1.28 gallons/flush.  The $50.00 rebate will be credited to your active water account, no checks will be mailed.

Rebates are limited to two per service address and will be issued on a first-come, first-serve basis.  Rebate Applications are available at Village Hall and here online.

For more inforamtion regarding WaterSense Toilets – click here.

 

  1. Property where toilet is installed is an active customer of Oregon Water & Sewer Utility.
  2. New toilet must be listed on EPA’s Water Sense Toilet model list.
  3. Applicants must be the owner of the property listed on the rebate application.
  4. An original, unaltered, dated sales receipt (dated on or after May 1, 2012) listing the model number, MUST accompany the rebate application.
  5. The old toilet cannot be reused.
  6. Applicant agrees and understands that Oregon Water & Sewer Utility or its representatives reserve the right to inspect the installation of the fixture before or after the rebate is credited to the applicant.
  7. Applicant understands that Oregon Water & Sewer Utility may withhold rebate until any of the above listed conditions are met.

Attached Document or FileToilet Rebate Application

Monroe, WA toilet rebate program

http://www.monroewa.gov/index.aspx?NID=450

WaterSense Toilet Program
Frequently Asked Questions

How much is the rebate?
The rebate is $75 per toilet, or the pre-tax purchase price of the toilet, whichever is less. The
rebate applies only to the cost of the toilet, not additional parts, labor or tax. You can apply for
one rebate per home. If you applied for a rebate in 2010 or 2011, you no longer qualify.

Who qualifies for the rebate?
Single family homes (house or condominium) and multifamily buildings (four or fewer units)
served by a water district or water association are eligible (no private wells). The home must be
located in Snohomish County, WA—excluding Hat Island and the following zip codes: 98077,
98241, 98251 and 98292.

Which toilets qualify for the rebate?
Any toilet with the EPA WaterSense label qualifies for a rebate. For a list of
WaterSense labeled toilets go to http://www.epa.gov/WaterSense/products/toilets.html

Who makes WaterSense toilets?
WaterSense toilets are high-efficiency toilets (HET). HETs use no more than 1.28
gallons per flush on average, or 20 percent less than the current plumbing standard.
All WaterSense labeled toilets have been rigorously tested by independent laboratories and
must reliably flush a minimum of 350 grams of solid.

Who makes WaterSense toilets and where are they sold?
All major toilet manufacturers produce WaterSense labeled models and all hardware and
bathroom supply stores carry several models.

What documentation must I provide to receive a rebate?
You must complete and sign the application form and attach a copy of the sales receipt. If the
receipt does not show the brand and model of the toilet, you must provide other
documentation, such as the WaterSense label and model number from the toilet packaging.

When must I apply?
You must submit your application within 60 days after purchasing the toilet. Applications
received beyond 60 days of the purchase will not be processed. How long does the program last?
This program is effective January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012, or until the program funds are
exhausted. Rebates are processed on a first-come, first-served basis.

How long does it take to get my rebate?
You should receive your rebate check within 4 to 6 weeks after receipt of the application.

How much water do WaterSense toilets save?
Toilets sold in Washington before 1994 use at least 3.5 gallons per flush. Since 1994, toilets are
required to use a maximum of 1.6 gallons per flush. Replacing a pre-1994 toilet will save a
typical household about 10,000 gallons of water a year. Replacing a newer toilet will save
about 1,400 gallons of water per year.

Who can I contact if I have questions?
Email Jordan Ottow at the City of Monroe—Water Quality at jottow@monroewa.gov or call
360-863-4546.

Southwest Florida Water Management District partners with area cities and utilities to provide low-flow toilet rebate programs.

Most offer up to a $100 rebate when residents replace inefficient toilets with low-flow models. The District splits the cost with participating cities and utilities.

Since 1991 the District has cooperatively funded retrofit programs such as toilet rebates resulting in an average savings of more than 13 million gallons per day!

To find out more information, please contact one of the following participating programs in your area.

City of Frostproof
(863) 528-2184

City of Lake Alfred
(863) 291-5274

City of St. Petersburg
(727) 893-7676

City of Venice
1-800-964-2140

East Pasco Water Coalition
City of Dade City
(352) 523-5050

City of Zephyrhills
(813) 780-0008

Town of Saint Leo
(352) 588-2622

Florida Government Utility Authority
City of New Port Richey and Holiday
(727) 372-0115

Manatee County
1-800-964-2140

Marion County
(352) 671-8686

Pasco County
1-800-964-2140

Steamboat Springs, CO water conservation rebate

http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_20583563/steamboat-springs-rebate-program-boost-water-conservation

http://www.steamboattoday.com/news/2012/may/09/steamboat-rebate-program-boost-water-conservation/

■ High-efficiency toilets ($150 rebate for commercial, maximum $1,050; $100 rebate for residential, limit two per residence)

Rebates are for replacement of toilets manufactured before 1994 that use 3.5 gallons per flush or more. Only EPA WaterSense-labeled toilets that use 1.28 gallons per flush or less listed atwww.epa.gov/WaterSense/product_search.htmlare eligible for rebate. The WaterSense logo must appear on the toilet or box.

■ High-efficiency clothes washers ($100 rebate, limit one per residence)

Replace your 2000 or older model clothes washer with a high-efficiency model. Only Tier 3 models listed by the Consortium for Energy Efficiency atwww.waterenergysavings.comare eligible.

■ High-efficiency dishwashers ($100 rebate, limit one per residence)

Replace your 2002 or older model dishwasher with a high-efficiency model. Only models listed at http://www.energystar.gov are eligible. Other restrictions apply.

Steamboat Springs — Local water providers have launched a rebate program to encourage residents to conserve treated water, and the city of Steamboat Springs is looking to lead by example.

While the city is looking at alternative methods for watering some of its parks, the rebate program allows homeowners to receive a $100 rebate by swapping out an old toilet, washing machine or dishwasher with one that is efficient. Businesses can receive $150 for replacing a toilet.

Businesses and residential users also can receive rebates for making irrigation systems more efficient by installing rain sensors or efficient spray nozzles.

Money also is available for those who might be willing to part with their perfectly manicured yards. Replacing existing irrigated turf with indigenous drought-tolerant plants or nonirrigated xeriscape is worth a rebate of as much as $75.

“We are pleased to be able to offer this rebate program to customers in Steamboat Springs and Steamboat II,” Mount Werner Water District General Manager Jay Gallagher said in a news release. “The goal is to eliminate those old water-guzzling appliances, toilets and irrigation systems and to educate customers on how they can save money by reducing water consumption with new efficient appliances and irrigation systems.”

A grant from the Colorado Water Conservation board is paying for 75 percent of the $66,000 rebate program. The remaining matching funds are coming from the Mount Werner Water District, City of Steamboat Springs District and Steamboat II Metro District. The rebates will be offered on a first-come, first-served basis. More information about the rebate program can be found at www.mwwater.com.

At the same time, the city is looking into using creek and river water at several parks that currently use treated water for irrigation.

By doing that, Steamboat’s Public Works Director Philo Shelton said, the city would be helping do its part in reducing the demand on the water filtration plant.

In the Steamboat area, officials are trying to reduce demand placed on the treatment plant, especially during peak usage days in the summer.

“Making wise water-use decisions directly affects the rate of future expenditures of public funds,” Gallagher said last week. “For each gallon we can shave off peak-day demand, we can defer the investment of a dollar in a new filtration bay. It also saves money on your water bill.”

Shelton said the city would be working with a consultant to help with the designs to convert the existing irrigation systems. He said the parks currently using river and creek water for irrigation are the Howelsen Hill fields, Emerald Fields and the Ski Town Fields next to the Tennis Center at Steamboat Springs.

With water rights owned by the city, Shelton said officials are looking at drawing water from creeks or the Yampa River for Little Toots Park, Stehley Park near Butcherknife Canyon, Memorial Park near Steamboat Springs High School and West Lincoln Park just west of the Bud Werner Memorial Library.

“We have the water rights, so I want us to use them,” Shelton said.

He said it was too early to say how much it would cost to convert the irrigation systems or how much money the city could save in water bills.

To reach Matt Stensland, call 970-871-4247 or email mstensland@SteamboatToday.com

Venice, FL toilet rebate program

http://www.venicegov.com/Files/Utilities/toilet_rebate.PDF

 

City of Fort Collins doubles rebate for replacing toilets

http://www.coloradoan.com/article/20120403/UPDATES01/120403011/City-Fort-Collins-doubles-rebate-replacing-toilets?odyssey=mod_sectionstories&nclick_check=1

The city of Fort Collins is offering residents a chance to double their rebate up to $70 through July for replacing old toilets.

Toilets are typically the main source of water use in the home-accounting for nearly 30 percent of indoor consumption. Pre-1994 toilets use 3.5 to 7 gallons per flush, while newer WaterSense models use as little as 1.28 gallons per flush. Bathrooms that haven’t been updated in the past 15 years can achieve a savings of thousands of gallons of water a year by installing high-efficiency toilets. Look for toilets that score 500 or more on the MaP (Maximum Performance) toilet testing (PDF 245KB).

 

Residents can receive a $35 rebate (double to $70 through July) when they replace old water-guzzling toilets with a qualified WaterSense labeled model, and an additional $15 for recycling your old toilet.

 

For information, go to www.fcgov.com.

Water – our new most valuable resource

“Water – our new most valuable resource” on “Southeast Green” on BlogTalkRadio.  Steve Williams, LEED AP of Water Management discusses the ins and outs of water conservation and why it’s so important for businesses

Water – our new most valuable resource 01/04 by Southeast Green | Blog Talk Radio.

Springfield, MO: City Utilities programs save power for the future

http://www.news-leader.com/article/20111226/NEWS01/112260337/City-Utilities-programs-save-power-future

City Utilities programs save power for the future

Conservation efforts, rebates prove to limit utility usage, costs.City Utilities conservation program

Written by
Wes Johnson
News-Leader

Want to learn more?

For more information about CU energy management and conservation programs, visit www.cuenergywise.com or call CU at 874-8200. That number goes directly to the Energy Management and Conservation department.

Expanded conservation programs offered by City Utilities are having a measurable impact on the utility’s future need for more electricity, gas and water.

Since 2007, electricity-conserving efforts such as commercial lighting rebates, removal of old refrigerators and rebates for Energy Star-rated appliances have cumulatively saved CU the equivalent power use of 4,562 average homes.

Rebates for high-efficiency HVAC units have helped reduce natural gas usage by the equivalent of 2,764 homes.

Water-conserving measures have cut use by the equivalent of 1,558 homes, according to CU.

“Any savings we make from conservation delays the need for additional capacity units into the future,” said Cara Shaefer, director of Energy Management and Conservation.

Shaefer notes those savings came from CU’s investment in energy management and conservation programs.

Over the past five years, CU has spent $5.6 million on a variety of programs. The amount includes program and administrative costs.

On the electricity-conservation side, Shaefer said CU’s commercial lighting rebate provided the most energy savings.

CU provided 146 commercial lighting rebates to companies that switched to more efficient lighting systems.

Rebates to improve heating and air conditioning units were the second most effective at conserving electricity and gas, Shaefer said.

More than 5,300 rebates were issued to upgrade HVAC systems to higher-efficiency units.

A recent program that gave CU customers a $35 credit on their electric bill to get rid of old refrigerators typically plugged in in garages proved successful.

That program took 1,549 refrigerators — usually older, less-efficient units — off CU’s system.

CU’s high-efficiency toilet rebate program resulted in more than 4,000 water-saving toilets being installed in Springfield.

“We’ve even seen a market transformation in Springfield because of this rebate,” Shaefer said. “When it began, there was only one or two retailers with them in stock. Today, you can’t go anywhere without them being available.”

City of Thornton, CO rebates for water conservation

http://www.thorntonwater.com/

Toilet rebates are offered for the replacement of pre-1994 toilets for residential and commercial properties.  Effective January 1, 2012 toilet rebates will be $75 per WaterSense toilet and residential clothes washer rebates will be $100 per qualifying washer.

City of Roseville, CA 2011 Commercial Programs & Rebates for water conservation

http://www.roseville.ca.us/eu/water_utility/water_efficiency/for_business/programs_n_rebates.asp

MARION COUNTY UTILITIES LAUNCHES TOILET REBATE PROGRAM

http://www.marioncountyfl.org/rssfeed/rsslinks/10%2024%2011%20Toilet%20Rebate%20Program.pdf

MARION COUNTY, Fla. (Oct. 24, 2011) – Marion County Utilities is offering a new incentive to help its customers increase their water efficiency practices and potentially lower their monthly water bills. Starting this month, utility customers who replace old toilets with new, water-efficient models could be eligible for toilet rebates. Qualifying customers who replace one toilet could receive up to $100 in rebates; those who replace a second toilet will be eligible for up to another $80 in reimbursements. The rebates will be issued as water bill credits. To qualify, an individual must: – Be a Marion County Utilities water customer in good standing. – Live in a home built prior to 1995. – Plan to replace a toilet of 3.5 or more gallons. – Call to verify eligibility and reserve the rebate at 1-800-964-2140. Customers are encouraged to reserve their rebate as soon as possible since only 1,400 rebates are available this year. Toilets installed prior to 1995 typically use 3.5 or more gallons of water with each flush. New models use only between 1.2 – 1.6 gallons per flush. Replacing just one high-flow toilet with an ultra low-flow toilet could save more than 1,000 gallons of water per month. Marion County Utilities funds the Toilet Rebate Program in cooperation with the St. Johns River Water Management District and the Withlacoochee River Basin Board of the Southwest Florida Water Management District. #

Billerica, MA Toilet and Clothes Washer Rebate Program

http://billericatownienews.com/town-of-billerica-toilet-and-clothes-washer-rebate-program-p3098-260.htm

Town of Billerica Toilet and Clothes Washer Rebate Program
Billerica Townie News – Joan Parcewski
• Fri, Oct 14, 2011

The Billerica DPW recently announced the launch of a Rebate program for the replacement of toilets, urinals and clothes washers that have water conserving fixtures. The “Water Conservation Fund” was established to help mitigate the Town water supply and will allow the DPW to offer these rebates.

In order to quality, the water customer must be in good standing and own the property where the fixtures will be changed out. Tenants may participate with written permission from the property owner.

In order to qualify the toilets, urinals and clothes washers must be specific models. Contact the DPW office at Town Hall for a list of these models. Qualifying toilet rebates are $100 – urinal rebates $25 – and clothes washer $225. All rebates will be applied as a credit on your water bill.

Applications may be picked up at the DPW Town Hall office ot at the Water Treatment Facility at 270 Treble Cove Rd. All applications must be submitted to the DPW Town Hall office within 90 days of purchase.

— WWW.Billerica Townie News

“Just Don’t Flush It”

This year’s winning short films were announced Sept. 20 at the Intelligent Use of Water™ Film Competition screening in Beverly Hills, CA. The 2011 Audience Choice Award went to

“Just Don’t Flush It” by Brian McAndrew, North Bend, Oregon – check it out!

40 Important Ways that Colleges Are Conserving Water

http://www.bestcollegesonline.com/blog/2011/09/06/40-important-ways-that-colleges-are-conserving-water/

Water is a precious resource, and although it flows freely from the tap, it’s not infinite. Green campus lawns, clean cafeteria plates, and even air conditioned dorms don’t happen without using lots of water. As major institutions, colleges are serious users of water, and although some don’t yet recognize the need to conserve water, many of them do. In fact, college campuses are home to some of the most innovative ideas for water conservation, implementing water management technology, smart conservation policies, and more. Read on to find out about 40 great ways colleges are putting great minds to work on water conservation.

  1. Cal State-LA technology

    Using a wireless water management service, Cal State-LA was able to lower their water bills and reduce water usage by about 27 million gallons in 18 months. The system also saves valuable staff time and adjusts to weather changes, turning off water before it rains.

  2. A new low flow standard

    The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education reports that low flow showerheads and faucets, as well as low water volume toilets and urinals are standard practice for US colleges.

  3. Dual flush toilets

    In addition to low flow toilets, colleges like Harvard are also using dual flush toilets, which allow toilets to use less water unless deemed necessary by their users.

  4. Recycling rooftop rainwater

    Drexel University turns rainwater into a resource rather than waste. Instead of sending it down the pipes to treatment plants, Drexel collects rainwater for non-potable uses, including toilet flushing, landscaping, and gardening.

  5. Cutting back on car washing

    Colleges make use of many vehicles on and off campus, and those vehicles need to be washed, but not frequently. Schools like the University of Washington have cut back on car washing in their motor pools to save water.

  6. Using campus resources

    Large campuses may have access to creeks and wells on their land. At Stanford University, almost 75% of water used for irrigation comes from water sourced on Stanford’s own land.

  7. Going trayless

    Many colleges are ditching trays in their cafeterias, cutting food waste, conserving water, and even keeping the “freshman 15” off new students. At Williams College alone, the college is saving 14,000 gallons of water each year by eliminating trays at one of four campus dining halls.

  8. Landscaping with drought-tolerant plants

    At Saint Mary’s College, drought-tolerant plants have been put in place, including oleander, lavender, and nadina, with drought-tolerant plants making up about 95% of campus plants.

  9. Installing water misers

    Schools like Stanford have made use of water misers on autoclaves in the Medical School and research buildings. Instead of having water running 24 hours a day on the devices, misers sense when the water is needed and when it is not. This measure alone has helped to reduce water usage in these buildings by over 50%.

  10. Educating students

    At UC-Santa Cruz, students arriving on campus will learn about water conservation in their orientation meetings, and the campus offers dorm room usage audits as well.

  1. Removing bottled water

    Instead of allowing bottled water as an option at campus events and at dining facilities, colleges like Harvey Mudd College are selling or providing refillable water bottles to faculty, staff, and students.

  2. Recirculating systems

    Coolers and other equipment using once-through water cooling systems are being replaced with ones that reuse cooled water, saving not only water, but electricity and gas as well.

  3. Water Wise House Call

    At Stanford University, they have recognized that university water usage doesn’t end off campus. Faculty and staff have their impact in private homes as well. With the Water Wise House Call program, the university has been able to manage water usage off campus by providing information and resources to faculty and staff.

  4. The Living Machine

    At Oberlin College, students get involved in wastewater cleaning with The Living Machine. The machine processes wastewater into reusable greywater by relying on natural cleaning methods in wetlands, including plants and bacteria.

  5. Green campus grounds with reclaimed water

    At the University of California Santa Barbara, 90% of campus grounds are kept green using reclaimed water. This water is also used to flush toilets in some buildings. Reclaimed water is wastewater that has undergone a treatment process, but does not meet standards for drinking.

  6. Recycling carpet

    Carpet doesn’t sound like a big water waster, but at Oberlin College, they’ve calculated their savings from recycling carpet. By recycling 177,057 square feet of used carpet, they’ve saved 112,136.1 gallons of water, in addition to 1,227,418,143 BTUs of energy.

  7. Natural thawing

    Some schools previously thawed food using running water. Instead, colleges like Evergreen State have implemented better planning, and are able to thaw all food products naturally without the use of running water.

  8. Leak detection technology

    Some schools employ water conservation technology that includes leak detection, allowing them to identify and correct leaks that exist on campus.

  9. Updated laundry rooms

    Colleges are upgrading to high efficiency front loading washers, and becoming even more energy efficient by using technology that allows them to monitor the status of the machines. At Canisius College, 755,638 gallons of water have been saved since 2006.

  10. I Heart Tap Water

    UC-Berkeley’s I Heart Tap Water campaign promoted tap water as the beverage of choice for the campus. The university credits the campaign’s success to the testing of more than 450 water fountains on campus to ensure water quality. The program has reduced campus usage of plastic water bottles on campus by at least 25%.

  1. Using cisterns

    Colleges are using cisterns to harvest rainwater. At Harford Community College, they capture rooftop runoff in an 80,000 gallon cistern to use in an evaporative cooling tower.

  2. Leak reporting

    Dripping faucets can waste more than 600 gallons a year, and running toilets waste more than 131,000 gallons. On many college campuses, students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to report any leaks that they see. Doing so can alert the maintenance staff to undiscovered sources of water waste that can be resolved easily.

  3. Hand sanitizer installation

    Duke University and many others have cut down on water used for sanitation purposes by installing hand sanitizers in bathrooms and other common areas. For quick sanitation purposes, a full hand wash using water is not needed, and alcohol-based sanitizer can be used instead.

  4. Smart flushing

    In addition to low flow and dual flush toilets, schools are updating with automatic eye flushers. These toilets flush according to the length of time a person is sitting on it, with a 1.1 gallon flush for less than 65 seconds, and 1.6 for 65 seconds or more.

  5. Laundry education

    Tufts reminds students to practice sustainable laundry techniques. Using a flyer, students are educated on using cold water options for washing clothing.

  6. Increased irrigation ponds

    At Duke University, they are taking advantage of more natural water storage by increasing the size of irrigation ponds on their golf course. This water can be used for toilets, landscaping, and more.

  7. Water free urinals

    Many colleges, including Vanderbilt University, are installing water-free urinals, which do not flush. Instead, the urinals use liquid chemicals and gravity, saving up to 40,000 gallons of water each year.

  8. Water use monitoring

    Enhancing awareness of water usage can help conservation efforts, making those who consume water more careful in their usage. Several colleges, including UC-Santa Cruz, have shared water use data publicly and within their community to spotlight conservation of water.

  9. Watering at night

    At lots of schools, watering was completed manually during the daytime, but more recently, colleges have implemented smart irrigation systems that water during the evening or early morning hours, saving evaporation, as well as overspray.

  10. Native plants

    Colleges like Centralia are switching to native plants, which need less water and maintenance due to their indigenous status.

  1. Rooftop vegetation

    To reduce the passage of rainwater into the sewer system, colleges are installing green roofs, which feature vegetation that consumes a large amount of water before running off. These systems also help to keep the top floor of buildings cooler during hot months, and insulated from cold temperatures and icy winds in the winter.

  2. Reduced power washing

    Everyone likes to see a sparkly clean college, but many schools are recognizing that they don’t need to power wash as often as they have in the past. At the University of Washington, power washing has been reduced to the removal of graffiti and slippery materials only.

  3. Simple reminders

    Using stickers, signs, and other awareness tools, schools are placing simple reminders in high water usage areas, such as busy restrooms. These reminders can help students be mindful about their water usage.

  4. Purchasing Energy Star equipment

    Dishwashers, washing machines, and other water-consuming appliances can make a big difference in water usage, especially on a college sized scale. Schools like Boston College are replacing their old equipment with new, more energy efficient machines, cutting water consumption by 50%.

  5. Updated facilities equipment

    Water cooled compressors, single pass chillers, cooling towers, and more often use water, and not always efficiently. Schools like the University of Washington have identified water wasting equipment and updated them, such as replacing water cooled compressors with air cooled ones.

  6. Drought-tolerant grass

    Schools are adopting the use of grass that doesn’t need to be watered or mowed often. At UC-Davis and UC-Riverside, a new strain of grass, UC-Verde, was created. This grass needs only 25% the amount of water used for typical turf grasses.

  7. On-demand hot water heaters

    Residential buildings may have their hot water heaters upgraded to tankless on demand models. At Dartmouth, these heaters are used to save water while students wait for the water to heat up.

  8. Removing lawn areas

    Maintaining lawn areas typically means keeping up with watering, but at Scripps College, they may not have to deal with it as much. The college is considering removing lawn areas where appropriate, reducing the amount of water needed to maintain campus lawns.

  9. Water coolers and taps

    With the use of water coolers, students, faculty, and staff can fill up reusable containers instead of buying bottled water. Schools like Dartmouth have employed the use of Brita pitchers and point of service units that dispense filtered (and sometimes even flavored) water.

  10. Water recycling washing machines

    At Middlebury College, soiled aprons and chef jackets go through to wash and rinse cycles, which ordinarily would be wasteful. But using a water recycler, the college is able to capture the rinse water for the next wash cycle.

Manatee water customers eligible for $100 rebate under toilet replacement program

http://www.mymanatee.org/home/government/county-administration/news-release/toilet_rebates.html

Manatee water customers eligible for $100 rebate under toilet replacement program

 

 

MANATEE COUNTY, FL (Sept. 1, 2011) – The Southwest Florida Water Management District and Manatee County are again offering Manatee County residents a financial incentive to save water by replacing high-volume toilets with low volume models.

 

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Manatee County water customers can apply for a rebate of up to $100 per replaced toilet for every high-volume toilet that is replaced with a low-volume model. There is a limit of two toilets per dwelling unit – residential, commercial or industrial.
New low-volume toilets use 1.6 gallons per flush or less, while older models may use up to 5 gallons per flush. The program is estimated to conserve as much as 10,900 gallons of water per day. The total cost of the program is being shared between the SWFWMD and Manatee County.
The rebate application must be approved prior to purchasing and installing the new low-volume toilet in order to receive a rebate. Single-family, multi-family, industrial and commercial customers may apply by calling (800) 964-2140 or by e-mailing the program administrator at MCRebate77@yahoo.com.
Educational material on toilet flapper replacement and other water conservation techniques are also available to all program participants.
For more information on the toilet rebate program, call Manatee County Utilities Office Specialist Marcia Brown at (941) 792-8811, ext. 5327. For more information on Manatee County Government, visit online at http://www.mymanatee.org or call (941) 748-4501.