Fort Collins, Co. offers $50.00 toilet rebate

Source:http://www.coloradoan.com/article/20100323/COLUMNISTS94/100322012/1024/lifestyle/Green-living-Reward-environment-and-yourself-by-saving-water-inside-and-out

Conserving water in our semi-arid region is vitally important to us all. Taking a few small actions to use water efficiently inside and out can make a big difference. All toilets are not created equally — some are thrifty while others are water-guzzlers.

 All toilets are not created equally — some are thrifty while others are water-guzzlers.

Pre-1994 toilets use 3.5 to 7 gallons per flush (gpf). Since toilets can last 25 years or more, many high water-using models are still in use. To help get those toilets out of service, Fort Collins Utilities is offering a rebate of up to $50 to install high-efficiency toilets.

Rebates are available for Utilities residential water customers who purchase qualified WaterSense labeled toilets that use 1.28 gpf or less. WaterSense products are certified by an independent laboratory to meet rigorous criteria for performance. You’ll receive a $35 rebate for the purchase of a qualifying toilet and an additional $15 for recycling your old one.

For more information on these rebates and other programs, visit fcgov.com/ FortCollinsConserves, e-mail ldaudney@fcgov.com, call               (970) 221-6877         (970) 221-6877 or TDD               (970) 224-6003         (970) 224-6003.

Another Reason to Get Outside

In the recent study, The Cognitive Benefits of Interacting With Nature, University of Michigan researchers, Marc G. Berman, John Jonides, and Stephen Kaplan, discuss the cognitive restorative benefits of a natural setting, rather than an urban setting. Their findings show that memory and attention improved 20 percent after an hour of interacting with nature.

http://www.ns.umich.edu/htdocs/releases/story.php?id=6892

Single-serve ground coffee pods

Somebody gave me a box of Starbucks Single-Serve Ground coffee pods, because it was near the expiration date and could not have sold in the store. Anyway, this box contains 12x 0.25oz pods, so a total of 3 oz. The retail price for this box is $4.95. Since I don’t have the kind of Espresso machine that uses pods, I opened every single package and used the grounds this way. Do you realize what a rip-off these are? You can purchase 12oz of Starbucks Espresso roast for about $10.00, that is 4x as much for only twice the price, so 50% cheaper. PLUS (!), every single pod is packaged in an aluminum/plastic type sleeve and the 12 pods are then all packaged together in a pretty cardboard box. The sleeves are not recyclable and I don’t think the cardboard box will end up in a recycling bin either. So, at least twice as much packaging ends up in landfills and will probably stay there FOREVER. PLEASE, take a minute and re-think if you really need those single serve packages (or, for that matter, the type of coffee-maker that requires these). It really doesn’t take so much longer to grab a measuring spoon and put those grounds in the conventional coffee maker. Trust me, I know what I am talking about. I can’t even get going in the mornings without my coffee and the 5 minutes I have to wait in the mornings are not really fun, but, life can’t be so busy that it justifies paying 50% more and wasting all that packaging. By the way, if you have a little bit of money to spare, opt for the coffee maker that grinds your beans fresh for every single cup you brew. You can save some money by buying your whole coffee beans in bulk and have awesome tasting coffee.

Think outside the bottle!

Join me and break the bottled water habit! Getting rid of bottled water is a win-win! You save money and water and help lessen the amount of plastic in landfills! You can now even win a trip to Glacier National Park. Please learn more about the campain here  http://water.newdream.org/campaigns/water/register/78023085e295e74b21a82b2bb7894a34/ 

Break the Bottled Water Habit, Win a Prize and Cut Your Carbon

When you want pure, healthy drinking water, you should reach for bottled water, right? Surprisingly, on neither a personal nor a global level are you making a healthy choice.

For each gallon of water bottled, two gallons are wasted; producing the plastic wastes  the energy equivalent of a quarter-bottle’s worth of oil. And what’s in the bottle could just be tap water.

New American Dream and Corporate Accountability International is asking you to think about where the water in that bottle came from, where the plastic is going, and take the Break the Bottled Water Habit pledge(water.newdream.org) and drink to a healthy ecosystem.

During October, make a conscious choice to slake your thirst without drying up our planet’s resources. In addition to benefiting the environment, participants will have a chance to win a free condo for a week at a ski resort in Idaho.  Visit the website (water.newdream.org now to get started.

Water is LIFE

 

 

A few months ago, on World Water Day, I saw Stephen Colbert’s show dedicated to Water. Colbert Report, March 20, 2008

Regardless of the opinion you may have of him as a comedian or on his political views, he made some very valid points and had some very interesting interviews. Please visit Water is Life on Colbert to view some of the videos; especially thirst locally – drink globally and Visit to the American Museum of Natural History is extremely interesting (more info on this exhibit can be found here Exhibition H2O=Life)

Clean, plentiful water is not always available where and when it’s needed. Indeed, water shortages and pollution threaten individuals, communities and countries around the globe. But many water problems also have solutions. From households to huge cities, elected officials to entrepreneurs, everyone has a role to play in protecting Earth’s water.

 

How much water do people use each day?

573 liters (151 gallons) per person per day U.S., average domestic and municipal use

118 liters (31 gallons) per person per day United Kingdom, average domestic and municipal use

10 liters (3 gallons) per person per day Ethiopia, average domestic and municipal use

People in the U.S. and Canada use much more water than residents of most other countries. In the U.K. and most other European countries, people live more water-efficient lifestyles. Most Ethiopians, like many others in the developing world, can’t get enough water to ensure basic health and sanitation.

 

Message in a Bottle

The average North American in 2005 consumed about 80 liters (21 gallons) of bottled water. Globally, consumption nearly doubled between 1997 and 2005, and the U.S. is the largest total consumer of bottled water. Manufacturing all those bottles uses a lot of water—twice as much as the bottles contain. Worldwide, over 2.7 million tons of plastic are used for water bottles, but in the U.S. only about 20 percent of the bottles are recycled. The total estimated energy needed to make, transport and dispose of one bottle of water is equivalent to filling the plastic bottle one-quarter full of oil.

 

Pure Imagination

People often choose bottled water assuming it’s safer than tap water, and perhaps imagining it comes from a pristine mountain spring. Most bottled water is safe-but so is the municipal water that is the source of an estimated 40 percent of U.S. bottled water. About 25% of bottled water sold is simply re-processed/used municipal(city) water according to a 1999 study in the United States.[10] Both Aquafina from Pepsi-Cola Company and Dasani from The Coca-Cola Company are reprocessed from municipal water systems. [11][12] Some bottled waters, such as Penta Water make unverified health benefit claims. While there have been few comprehensive studies, one analysis several years ago found that about 22 percent of brands that were tested contain, in at least one sample, chemical contaminants at levels above strict state health limits. If consumed over a long period of time, some of these contaminants could cause cancer or other health problems[13] at rates higher than those considered tolerable by the regulatory body setting the standards. In addition, 60 to 70 percent of all bottled water in the U.S. is packaged and sold in a state that is not regulated by the FDA

 

Smarter Solutions

If you want to carry water with you, why not get a reusable bottle and refill it at the tap?

 

By the Numbers

Average price of tap water in the U.S. = less than $.01 a gallon

Average price of bottled water in the U.S. = about $10 a gallon

More on Bottled Water on Wikipedia

The Story of Stuff

From its extraction through sale, use and disposal, all the stuff in our lives affects communities at home and abroad, yet most of this is hidden from view. The Story of Stuff is a 20-minute, fast-paced, fact-filled look at the underside of our production and consumption patterns. The Story of Stuff exposes the connections between a huge number of environmental and social issues, and calls us together to create a more sustainable and just world. It’ll teach you something, it’ll make you laugh, and it just may change the way you look at all the stuff in your life forever.