Toronto, ON may make low flow mandatory and cancel toilet rebates

Source
http://muddyyork.com/2010/04/23/low-flow-toilet-proposal-might-squash-even-more-ontario-home-renovation-rebates/

Toronto is just one of the handful of Ontario municipalities offering a rebate for homeowners who’ll install a water-conserving toilet this year, but a new proposal from the Premier’s office is planning on making them mandatory. If this proposal is accepted, it’s a measure that would likely cancel the rebates. Other provincial municipalities, such as Innisville, have determined that rebate and incentive water conservation programs would be far too costly, and in Innisville alone it’s estimated that it would cost them at least $1.6 million to implement one. Meanwhile, Barrie’s toilet replacement rebate program is barely staying afloat and city councillors recently approved a $50,000 boost because of unexpected costs.

Currently, the Toronto rebate program promises up to $75 if you replace a water-wasting toilet with a water conserving one, but the legislation put forth would make it mandatory for all retailers across the province to sell only low-water toilets (six-litres as opposed to 13-litres) by January of next year. Toilets generally use up 30 per cent of a home’s water and annually, a low-flush toilet cuts this water consumption by half.

Coincidentally, on the same day the new measures were proposed the country’s largest retailer of hardware and home renovation products, RONA, announced that it would no longer sell any toilets with volumes that are more than six-litres.

This proposal comes soon after the federal government cancelled the Canadian ecoENERGY retrofit rebate program, which offered homeowners up to $5,000 in grants and rebates when they made energy-saving renovations before March 31, 2011. For now the provincial programs are still in effect, including the Ontario Home Energy Savings Program, which similar to the federal program offers homeowners up to $5,000 in grants and rebates for energy-efficient renovations.

Receive 50% off MSRP on any Caroma toilet during the month of April

Start Saving. With one flush we can make a difference and save the most precious resource on earth! See below to learn more about how One Flush Can Make a Difference!

Please fill out this form to receive 50% off the MSRP of all Caroma toilets. There are no limits on the number of Caroma toilets you can purchase with this discount. Additional shipping charges may apply.

This promotion will run through the month of April in observance of Earth Day!

Can One Flush Make a Difference?

Absolutely! In the United States federal law requires that new toilets must not exceed 1.6 gallons of water per flush (gpf).The high efficiency toilet (HET) category has set a standard in North America with 1.28 gallons per flush (gpf). Caroma’s HET’s go even further: The average flush of the toilets in Caroma’s standard collection is 1.06 gpf, while the Smart Series features an industry breaking .96 gpf!

Just think. If just one person uses a high efficiency toilet for one year then they will save around 330 gallons of water (based on the average three times a day flush). Further, if your toilet is from the 1980s, when new toilets were regulated to use 3.5 gallons of water per flush, you would save 2,410 gallons per year by switching to a HET toilet! One flush CAN make a difference.

The numbers simply add up. If five people replaced their old 3.5 gpf toilet, over 12,000 gallons of water or the equivalent of 300, 20 minute showers would be saved. One flush does make a difference, but if 2,000 people with new toilets switched to a HET toilet, in one year you would be able to fill an Olympic sized swimming pool with the water saved: 660,430 gallons! If 822 people using the old 3.5 gpf toilets changed to a Caroma HET toilet, we could fill an Olympic pool with the water saved!

City of Fitchburg, WI approves toilet rebate program

please find program details here

http://www.city.fitchburg.wi.us/public_works/water_supply.php

Save Water While Saving Money—Georgia Sales Tax Holiday Features WaterSense® Labeled Products

If you’re planning to buy a toilet or bathroom sink faucet this fall, timing your purchase to coincide with Georgia’s sales tax holiday for WaterSense labeled products can help you save a little money. Between October 1 and October 4, 2009, customers will not have to pay sales tax on toilets and bathroom sink faucets and accessories that have earned the WaterSense label. Consumers can be sure that products with the WaterSense label have been independently certified to meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) rigorous criteria for water efficiency and performance. 

Purchasing and installing WaterSense labeled products is a key way Georgians can save water. If just one out of every four households in Georgia would retrofit their bathrooms with WaterSense labeled bathroom fixtures, it could save nearly 10 billion gallons per year—enough for every Georgian to take a shower daily for about two months. 

Whether remodeling a bathroom, constructing a new home, or simply replacing older, inefficient fixtures that waste money and water, consider installing a WaterSense labeled toilet or bathroom sink faucet. 

As consumers shop for WaterSense labeled toilets during the sales tax holiday, they can be sure these fixtures use 20 percent less water than the current federal standard for toilets and that WaterSense labeled bathroom sink faucets and accessories will reduce a sink’s water flow by 30 percent or more. Because all products must be tested to meet EPA’s criteria before earning the WaterSense label, these water savings are achieved without sacrificing performance. 

The sales tax holiday on WaterSense labeled products will start Thursday, October 1 at midnight and will continue through the weekend until 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, October 4.  Any WaterSense labeled product purchased for noncommercial home or personal use during the sales tax holiday will be Georgia state sales tax-free. 

For more information on the sales tax holiday, visit Conserve Water Georgia.

For more information on WaterSense, please visit www.epa.gov/watersense

For more information on WaterSense labeled, High Efficiency Toilets, please contact GA’s largest seller of the award-winning Caroma Dual Flush toilets, ecoTransitions. All of Caroma’s 47 floor mounted models also qualify for the $100 toilet rebate offered by most Metro Atlanta Water authorities. For more information, visit http://www.ecotransitions.com/ or contact them via email at sales@ecotransitions.com or by phone at (678) 313-9260. ecotrans_watersense_partner logo

Toilet rebate in Seattle, WA – only during the month of September 2009

Source Komo News

Pay close attention to your water bill. A new rebate program could mean extra money in your pocket.

Seattle Public Utilities is partnering with 17 local water districts and six local retailers in a program aimed at conserving water and helping consumers save money.

September water bills include a $30 instant rebate coupon for replacing water-guzzling toilets with newer high-efficiency models.

Only certain toilets qualify. They must carry an EPA WaterSense label and use only 1.28 gallons per flush.

Turns out more than half the households in this area – 52 percent – still have toilets that use twice the water needed to do the job.

Toilets made before 1982 use 5 to 7 gallons per flush (GPF). Toilets made from 1982 to 1993 use 3.5 gallons. In 1994 the requirement dropped to 1.6 gallons.

The 1.28 GPF models have been around since about 2006.

Depending on your water and sewer rates, switching from a high GPF toilet to a high-efficiency 1.28 GPF model can lower your water bill by $30 to $100 a year- maybe even more.

According to Seattle Public Utilities, a Seattle family of four who flushes 20 times a day with a 3.5 GPF toilet pays $420.58 a year. With a 1.28 GPF model, the bill drops to $160.81 for an annual savings of nearly $260.

The rebate program runs through the month of September.

For participating water districts and retailers, click here.

The drought is officially over. We can go back to our old ways…

The drought is over. 

That’s the word from Georgia’s top environmental officials. After years of water restrictions and conservation programs, water levels across the state appear to be getting back to normal.

The state climatologist says Georgia experienced the wettest spring season on record in 115 years.  In fact, Governor Sonny Perdue says heavy rainfall in recent months helped the entire state emerge from the worst drought categories, prompting restrictions on outdoor water use to be lifted for the first time since 2006. 

So, should we still conserve water? Absolutely.

Why should we conserve water?

 There are many good reasons to conserve water.

Water conservation can help meet future needs.

Water is a precious resource – our lives depend on it. In Georgia, the average consumption (residential, commercial and industrial, not agricultural) is 168 gallons per day, 10% higher than the national average of 153 gallons a day. An adult needs less than a gallon per day for drinking purposes, but 101 gallons per day are used in residential applications.

(Source: http://www.p2ad.org/files_pdf/cwmbs.pdf

Georgia’s population growth is among the most rapid in the nation. In the last decade, the state’s population has increased by more than 1.7 million. If current trends continue, Georgia’s population will reach 11.9 million in 2025. A doubling of demand for water over the next twenty years is highly probable. Given that drought-prone Georgia already uses a relatively high share of its land for residential purposes, future population growth will have a meaningful impact upon the supply of fresh water. As more and more faucets drain the aquifers, or underground reservoirs, urban sprawl paves over the land and short-circuits its absorption properties. Georgia’s fast-growing cities face water shortages by 2020 unless local utilities find new supplies.

Saving water will save you money.

Conserving water saves you money! Not only will your water bill go down, but as you heat less water, your gas or energy bill will also decline. If your whole community conserves, you will also pay less fees for water-related services. Water conserving communities will not need to pay as much to develop new supplies and expand or upgrade water and wastewater infrastructure.

 The City of Atlanta has approved a 12.5% rate increase effective July 1, 2009 and another 12% increase in 2010.  

Approved Water and Sewer Rates City of Atlanta

Water conservation helps preserve the environment.

Quite simply, water is the essential component of all life. It comprises 70% of the Earth’s surface and 75% of the human body. Of that 70% of surface water, only 1% is actually drinkable. Water is needed to keep the ecosystem in balance. Clouds need water to make rain. Plants need water to grow. Animals depend on plants for the oxygen they produce and the food they provide. When one element of the chain is compromised, the entire system is thrown out of whack. Roughly 46% of America’s lakes are too polluted for fishing, swimming or hosting aquatic life. 1.2 trillion gallons of untreated sewage, storm water, and industrial waste are discharged into US waters annually.

 There are many obvious reasons for us to protect our water supply, but the most important point to remember is that water is absolutely essential to all living things. Educate yourself, dedicate yourself, and you can make a difference.

(Source: http://www.luminant.com/scholar/docs/EnvironmentWater.pdf)

A significant level of water conservation can be achieved without major changes in lifestyle. Simply watering landscapes properly and utilizing efficient plumbing fixtures and appliances in the home can reduce the per-capita water use by 25 percent.

Free High Efficiency Toilet in Claremont, CA on June 27, 2009

view details here http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_iFIDdxibrTg/SiKplZzmRfI/AAAAAAAADlo/CkBaewwp2XQ/s800-h/lowflow.jpg

http://www.ci.claremont.ca.us/index.cfm