Save Water, Save A Buck

About Save Water, Save A Buck

Save Water, Save a Buck is a rebate program in Southern California that offers cash rebates on a wide variety of water-saving technologies. Devices available for rebates include High-Efficiency and Ultra Low Flush Toilets, High-Efficiency and Zero Water Urinals, food services equipment such as Pre-Rinse Spray Heads and Connectionless Food Steamers, HVAC equipment such as Cooling Tower and pH Conductivity Controllers, cleaning equipment such as High-Efficiency Clothes Washers and Pressurized Waterbrooms and medical equipment like X-Ray Film Processor Recirculation Systems, Steam Sterilizer Retrofits and Dry-Vacuum Pumps.

Through MWD’s Save Water, Save A Buck Program, Southern California businesses are eligible for generous rebates to help encourage water efficiency and conservation.

The program also offers rebates on outdoor landscaping equipment such as weather based “smart” irrigation controllers, rotating spray nozzle retrofits for pop-up spray heads, high efficiency nozzle retrofits for large rotary sprinklers and synthetic turf.

As the drought is worsening and the water levels at Lake Lanier declining, it may be time for a program like Save Water, Save a Buck ibaby treefrog born in our back yardn Georgia. Not only will we save millions of gallons of drinking water and money each day, we will also help our economy. Plumbers will have work, Manufacturers will start hiring again and we will feel good about doing something ” kind” to our world in these tough times. Please read the Mission Statement as well as a lot more interesting information about Water efficiency and Water Recycling here.

As a Small Business, but nevertheless largest Supplier for Caroma Dual Flush toilets in Georgia, I am a proud to notice that the list of eligible High Efficiency Toilets (HET’s)  includes the follwing models

  1. 46 manufactured by Caroma Industries
  2. 20 made by Toto
  3. 19 made by Crane
  4. 17 made by American Standard
  5. 12 mady by Kohler
  6. 11 made by Mansfield
  7. 9 made by Zurn

and several made by various manufactures such as Aquasource, Briggs, Cascadian, Foremost, Gerber, Glacier Bay, Greentide, Jacuzzi, Niagara, OPS, Pegasus (a Home Depot brand), Proflow (a Ferguson brand), Quality Craft, Seasons (a HD Supply brand), Sterling (a Kohler company), Tangshan Ayers Bath, Tynan, Vitra, Vortens and Wateridge.

h2zero_3

Furthering an ongoing commitment to products that conserve water, Caroma has recently introduced the H2Zero™ Waterless Urinal in the US. The vitreous china urinal incorporates unique cartridge technology that operates with zero water for optimum performance and water conservation. Another model, the Leda urinal uses only 0.48 gallons per flush while the Cube 3 Ultra uses a remarkable 0.15 gallons per flush, or a mere pint of water. Thanks to its innovative design and technology, the Cube 3 Ultra was named one of the Top 10 green building products of 2007 by GreenSpec.

All eligible toilets are included on the list of WaterSense labeled High Efficiency toilets, which is updated regularly on EPA’s WaterSense program site. Since I became a WaterSense partner in Georgia beginning of 2008, the list of Watersense labeled toilets grew from 115 models on 11/29/07 to 249 models on 12/15/08.

Find out more about Caroma toilets at ttp://www.caromausa.com or http://www.ecoTransitions.com. To see why they work so well, please visit us on YouTube.

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The True Cost of Water

Source EPA WaterSense

It’s a story more complicated than it first appears. A drought looms. A community conserves. And then, even though less water is being used, the cost of water rises.

This is the situation facing Atlanta’s northern and western suburbs, where regional water wholesaler Cobb County-Marietta Water Authority is increasing rates by about 50 cents per thousand gallons this October. Atlanta communities had cut back water use significantly in response to a record drought in the region that started in 2007.

So what gives?

Beneath the surface, this issue is more complicated than it first appears. These Atlanta suburbs, like most communities in America, had not been paying the true cost of water.

In general, the price of water in the United States has little to do with supply and demand. Municipalities and regulators typically set rates as low as possible, so much so that 30 percent of all water utilities operate at a loss or a deficit. Often water rates will increase for a multitude of reasons.

Consider this: the American drinking water infrastructure network spans more than 700,000 miles—more than four times longer than the National Highway System—and in many municipalities, these pipes are more than 100 years old. An EPA study estimates that updating aging water infrastructure could cost nearly $500 billion over the next two decades.

Inevitably, water rates will go up in order to pay for the replacement of old infrastructure, new water treatment technologies for better water quality, and new water infrastructure to support increasing populations. Water efficiency can in fact help utilities save money over the long run by delaying costly capital expansions. And many homeowners may find that through water efficiency, even if they pay more per drop of water, they will still be paying less overall on their water bills than they would have before.

What’s more, Atlanta communities were asked to take drastic, necessary measures to reduce water use well beyond water efficiency or conservation. “What is painting efficiency in a bad light in the Southeast is the failure to recognize the difference between emergency response and efficiency. The extreme watering restrictions and mandated reductions we’ve experienced in Atlanta are emergency drought management tactics and they have devastating financial ramification just like any natural disaster such as hurricanes or tornados,” said Kathy Nguyen, water-efficiency program manager for Cobb County Water System, the Authority’s largest customer. “Efficiency is not about hardship, sacrifice, and mandates and it does not destroy a water system’s fiscal plan.”

Finally, tap water is, on the whole, inexpensive. Bottled water costs from 100 times to more than 2,000 times more than tap water. In the Atlanta metro area, the Cobb County rate increase will equate to about $3.25 more for water per month for the average family. In the long run, however, it’s still better to protect water supplies and systems for future generations.

What is WaterSense?

WaterSense, a partnership program sponsored by EPA, seeks to protect the future of our nation’s water supply by offering people a simple way to use less water.


Dual Flush toilets mandatory in Ireland – the way to “go”!

This is an article published on August 20, 2008 in the Irish Times

New building controls to ban traditional toilets

by HARRY McGEE, Political Staff

THE STANDARD toilet is about to be flushed out as part of a new Government water conservation measure.

Environment Minister John Gormley has signed off on new building regulations that will lead to a ban on traditional toilets.

The Government says that the move will lead to hundreds of millions of gallons drinking water being saved each year.

Under the new regulations, all toilets fitted into homes will be required to have a dual-flush system.

In addition, dual-flush toilets will be the only models available at DIY stores, plumbing supplies stores and hardware shops. The regulations will be implemented from November.

Yesterday, Mr Gormley said that making dual flush toilets mandatory would lead to greater efficiencies in the use of water, and was a sensible and practical step that formed part of the National Water Conservation Programme.

Official estimates suggest that as much of a third of the country’s drinking water is used to flush toilets, which the Government considers poor use of a valuable resource.

Standard toilets in Irish homes and workplaces flush between six and nine litres.

Dual flush toilets release four litres in water-saving mode, and six litres for a full flush.

“It demonstrates how simple but practical ways can be found to conserve water,” said Mr Gormley, adding that further water conservation measures would be introduced.

These are unlikely to include any attempt to introduce water charges or metering, issues that have proved politically divisive in the past.

If you are interested in finding out more about Dual Flush toilets, visit www.caromausa.com. Caroma, an Australian company has invented the Dual Flush system in the 80’s and has a 90% market share in Australia. With a fully glazed 4″ trapway, blockages are virtually eliminated.

San Antonio Water System gives away 20,000 free Caroma Dual Flush toilets

Perhaps the City of Atlanta should consider this. San Antonio has implemented an incredible program, resulting in tremendous water savings PLUS lots of business for plumbers. Read full article here 

http://www.reevesjournal.com/CDA/Articles/Cover_Story/BNP_GUID_9-5-2006_A_10000000000000283282

Georgia’s Drought on my mind…

Georgia’s current drought did not begin a few days or a few weeks ago. Various drought events throughout the state since spring 2006 combined with a lack of efficient water use habits helped bring the state to where it is today. Indoor Water Conservation Cannot Be Overemphasized! Conserving water temporarily, then returning to inefficient water use habits will not help alleviate the situation. Water conservation must become a way of life for all Georgians, according to officials with the state’s Drought Response Unified Command (DRUC).