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International Code Council World Toilet Summit

via International Code Council World Toilet Summit.

International Code Council World Toilet Summit 

The first ever U.S. International Code Council World Toilet Summit

Hosted by the American Society of Plumbing Engineers
Convention and Engineered Plumbing Exposition
October 30 – November 3, 2010
Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia

Learn about

  • This virtually untapped sanitation market
  • The best ways to reach 2.6 billion potential customers
  • That most of this massive consumer base have dispensable incomes
  • How you can help save lives while generating huge profits

The World Toilet Summit has always attracted key global leaders in the sanitation and water arena. But never before has this outstanding event that focuses on innovations and business opportunities in this life-critical area taken place in the United States…until now.

Two-for-One Event

The International Code Council is proud to partner with the World Toilet Organization on this landmark global event that is being hosted by ASPE during their Convention and Engineered Plumbing Exposition (EPE). With seven combined ASPE and ICC WTS tracks, over 300 exhibitors, and multiple networking and social events, this first ever U.S. ICC WTS and ASPE Convention offers two conferences for the price of one.

Schedule of Activities

Saturday, October 30

  • ASPE will hold member meetings and other member-centric activities

Sunday, October 31

  • Convention Opening Welcome Party begins at 7pm at the National Constitution Center

Monday, November 1

  • International Breakfast – 8:00 – 10:00 a.m.
  • International Code Council overview – 10:00 – 11:15 a.m.
  • Engineered Plumbing Exposition – 11:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
  • Exhibitor hospitality receptions – begin at 6:30 p.m.

Tuesday, November 2

  • WTS & ASPE sessions – 8:30 – 11:15 a.m.
  • Engineered Plumbing Exposition continues – 11:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • WTS & ASPE sessions continue – 3:45 – 5:00 p.m.
  • ASPE & ICC WTS Banquet begins at 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday, November 3

  • WTS & ASPE sessions – 8:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
  • Key WTS topic discussion and demonstration (specific topic TBD)

Profit While Helping Others

The global sanitation crisis takes the life of a child every 15 seconds. Nearly 40% of the world’s population has no access to proper sanitation. This marketplace of 2.6 billion potential sanitation consumers need the help of plumbing professionals to eradicate these horrific statistics.

While altruism is wonderful, there are also huge profits to be made for those who engage in developing and delivering sanitation products and services to the developing world. It is a startling, but true fact that the poor have been buying more hand phones than toilets, which is causing the developed world to realize that there is a tremendous market for goods and services at the bottom of the economic pyramid. The purchasing power of the poor has been increasing with the availability of improved access to financing, as well as better market data that results in fairer prices for products.

This not-to-be-missed conference will give you everything you need to know to start capturing a share of the international sanitation market while helping to improve conditions for the 40% of the world’s population who have no access to proper sanitation.

Click on the links in the menu of choices on the right side of the page for more conference details.

Click here to learn more about the World Toilet Organization (WTO) and their efforts to provide toilets and safe sanitation worldwide.

To learn more, contact the ICC’s PMG Resource Center at 1-888

Low-flow toilets at schools in Albuquerque Public Schools

http://www.aps.edu/news/aps-saves-water-taxpayer-dollars-through-district-wide-toilet-replacement

Albuquerque Public Schools and the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority have collaborated to install low-flow toilets at schools throughout the district, an effort expected to save more than $25,000 and 13.5 million gallons of water each year. Read more

Toilet rebates flush with requests, but cash draining

Source National Post November 23, 2009, 4:30 PM by Jodie Shupac

The shift to all things green gains momentum, and certain cities are flush with requests for energy-efficient household alternatives.

Sales Tax holiday in Georgia October 1-4, 2009

October 1-4, 2009

A culture of conservation is growing in Georgia.

We are responsible for the stewardship of our state’s natural resources. Incorporating energy and water conservation practices into our daily lives benefits everyone in our state now and for generations to come. And small changes can make a big impact in our pocketbooks. To help make those changes a little easier, Georgia is offering the ENERGY STAR® and WaterSense® Sales Tax Holiday, Oct. 1-4, 2009.

During the sales tax holiday, you can purchase ENERGY STAR-qualified or WaterSense-labeled products up to $1,500 without paying sales tax. In addition to the up-front cost savings, purchasing and installing more-efficient appliances and products can reduce in-home utility costs and improve both energy and water conservation.

 

ENERGY STAR®

ENERGY STAR products meet strict energy efficiency guidelines set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy. These appliances, electronics and lighting operate while using less energy – and less money – than older models.

Americans, with the help of ENERGY STAR, prevented 43 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions in 2008 alone – equivalent to the annual emissions from 29 million vehicles – and saved more than $19 million on their utility bills. By looking to ENERGY STAR for best practices and products, households can reduce their energy use and save about one-third, or $750 annually, on their utility bills, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

 

WaterSense®

WaterSense, a national program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, makes it easy to find water-efficient products. Toilets, faucets and other products that are independently certified to meet U.S. EPA criteria for water effi­ciency and performance can earn the label.Look for WaterSense labeled products

The average household spends as much as $500 per year on its water and sewer bill. By installing WaterSense-labeled fixtures and ENERGY STAR-qualified appliances that use water more efficiently, a household could save about $170 per year. If just one out of every four households in Georgia retrofit their bathrooms with WaterSense-labeled fixtures, it could save nearly 10 billion gallons of water per year – enough for every Georgian to take a shower daily for about two months.

For more information on ENERGY STAR, please visit http://www.gefa.org/Index.aspx?page=352

For more information on WaterSense, please visit http://www.conservewatergeorgia.net/documents/ waterSense_taxHoliday.html

Flushing potatoes at the Sweetwater 420 Festival 2009 in Atlanta

created by Creative Artists, Monroe, GA

Toilet rebate program in the City of Camrose, AB Canada

Source: http://www.camrosecanadian.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=1645347, By JEFFREY KU/City of Camrose

The City of Camrose is bringing back the Low Flow Toilet Rebate Program for 2009’s summer season from July 1 to Aug. 31. The rebate offers $80 to those who replace an older, high volume toilet with a eligible, newer low-flow model in their home with a limit of one per household for purchases after Oct. 31, 2008 and installations before Aug. 31, 2009.

The City of Camrose is running the Low Flow Toilet Rebate Program again hoping that it will encourage and educate the citizens of Camrose on the subject of water conservation. Conserving water will not only benefit the environment from which the resource is taken, but it will also benefit the City by reducing the load put on the water treatment plant and citizens and reducing their water bills by using less water. All citizens of the City of Camrose who live within city limits are eligible for this rebate. To qualify for the program, the City of Camrose must receive the following:

1. The address in which the toilet is to be installed.

2. Receipt of purchase of new, approved low-flow toilet.

3. Pictures of the washroom, before and after installation.

4. Evidence that the toilet was made none functional.

Camrose is running this program alongside, but having no affiliation with the federal government’s Home Renovation Tax Credit and ecoENERGY Retrofit—home grant programs that offer tax benefits for those doing certain home renovations. For more information, contact Jeffrey Ku with the City of Camrose at 780-672-4428 or e-mail at engineer@camrose.ca

Lack of money for rebates halts Inland distribution of water-saving toilets

Source http://www.pe.com/localnews/inland/stories/PE_News_Local_S_toilets02.48120c7.html

By LAURIE LUCAS
The Press-Enterprise

 
Western Municipal Water District’s participation in a program that this week will finish delivering 1,500 water-saving toilets at no cost to Riverside County homes, hotels and commercial buildings is in limbo because of doubt about whether Western will receive promised rebates.

In the past three months, the Mission Inn, UC Riverside and March Air Reserve Base received a total of 1,000 of the toilets, and 500 went to Corona, mostly to multifamily residences such as apartments.

One low-flow toilet will save about 2 gallons per flush or 4,800 gallons a year, according to Clay Monroe, water conservation coordinator with Riverside Public Utilities.

But the program was suspended because of the uncertainty of reimbursement from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, said Tim Barr. He’s the water use efficiency manager for Western, which covers 527 square miles serving 853,000 people in the Jurupa Valley, Corona, Norco, Riverside, Moreno Valley, Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Canyon Lake and Temecula. Besides Riverside, the city of Corona also worked closely with Barr to promote the project.

Metropolitan’s blanket program, “SoCal Water$mart” was designed as a conservation incentive for the 26 cities and agencies that buy its water in six counties for 19 million people. Rebates on high-efficiency toilets and other equipment had been available to residents of areas that receive MWD water, including Eastern and Western municipal water districts in Riverside County and Inland Empire Utilities Agency in western San Bernardino County.

Barr said Western drew up its own marketing campaign touting low-flow toilets.

Story continues below
William Wilson Lewis III / The Press-Enterprise
Michael Franchek, vice president of sales and marketing with Ecogreen Services, removes a 3.5-gallon toilet from an apartment in Riverside.

8,000 INSTALLED

Eastern installed 8,000 of the low-flow toilets this last fiscal year. The agency has shelved requests for another 1,500 until Metropolitan resolves its budget problems. Perris-based Eastern serves an area from Moreno Valley south to Temecula and east to Hemet and San Jacinto.

The Inland Empire Utilities Agency installed 4,256 low-flow toilets this last fiscal year. Chino-based Inland serves the cities of Chino, Chino Hills, Fontana, Montclair, Ontario, and Upland as well as the Cucamonga Valley and Monte Vista Water Districts and the Water Facilities Authority.

Initially, Metropolitan agreed to pitch in anywhere from $50 to $100 per toilet; Western would pick up the rest of the cost from its rate payers. But because Metropolitan didn’t have the money to cover the overwhelming demand for rebates, Western could be on the hook for anywhere from $65 to $110 per toilet, Barr said. “So Metropolitan is suspending its commercial program from three to six months until after an audit and they figure out how to go forward,” Barr said.

Story continues below
Low-flow toilets save about 2 gallons per flush, or 4,800 gallons a year, conservation experts say.

MWD’s regional rebate program is $24 million in the hole. The program started with $20 million, which doubled last February. Those resources dried up in May and the board turned off the spending tap until an audit is complete. A report is expected at the next board meeting, July 14.

The San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District, the regional equivalent of Metropolitan, serving 700,000 water users over 350 square miles, might offer a similar water conservation program, according to Douglass Headrick, deputy general manager. “We’re watching to see how this will play out with Metropolitan,” he said.

PROGRAM WINDS DOWN

Meanwhile, Western’s program is winding down this week with toilet installations concluding in the Sandra Apartments on 7th Street in Riverside, said contractor Michael Franchek.

His Encinitas-based company, Ecogreen Services, contracted with Western Municipal in April to install 1,500 toilets at $165 apiece. Since April, Franchek has placed 80 percent of the new toilets in multi-family residences and the rest in hotels and commercial buildings.

Low-flow toilets look no different from their predecessors and cost about the same, according to Franchek.

“They flow a lot less because of their intelligent design,” he said.

The old fixtures use 3.5 gallons per flush while their replacements use less than 1.3 gallons per flush. Recyclers grind up the put-out-to-pasture toilets which are used as construction aggregate.

Russ Kitchen, director of the Mission Inn’s property operations, said he’s pleased with the 80 new low-flows, the latest in the hotel’s efforts to go green.

“We’re always looking for ways to conserve our natural resources,” he said. Management has retrofitted its cooling center to use less energy and replaced most lighting with fluorescent bulbs.

Reach Laurie Lucas at 951-368-9569 or llucas@PE.com

TO SAVE WATER

Take shorter showers

Turn off the faucet when brushing teeth

Water your lawn only when it needs it

Use a broom to clean driveways and sidewalks

Adjust sprinklers so they don’t water driveways and sidewalks

Wash only full loads of laundry

Run dishwasher only when full

Fix leaky faucets and toilets

Use a shut-off nozzle on your hose

Plant drought-resistant trees and plants

Source: Western Municipal Water District

 

 

The drought is officially over. We can go back to our old ways…

The drought is over. 

That’s the word from Georgia’s top environmental officials. After years of water restrictions and conservation programs, water levels across the state appear to be getting back to normal.

The state climatologist says Georgia experienced the wettest spring season on record in 115 years.  In fact, Governor Sonny Perdue says heavy rainfall in recent months helped the entire state emerge from the worst drought categories, prompting restrictions on outdoor water use to be lifted for the first time since 2006. 

So, should we still conserve water? Absolutely.

Why should we conserve water?

 There are many good reasons to conserve water.

Water conservation can help meet future needs.

Water is a precious resource – our lives depend on it. In Georgia, the average consumption (residential, commercial and industrial, not agricultural) is 168 gallons per day, 10% higher than the national average of 153 gallons a day. An adult needs less than a gallon per day for drinking purposes, but 101 gallons per day are used in residential applications.

(Source: http://www.p2ad.org/files_pdf/cwmbs.pdf

Georgia’s population growth is among the most rapid in the nation. In the last decade, the state’s population has increased by more than 1.7 million. If current trends continue, Georgia’s population will reach 11.9 million in 2025. A doubling of demand for water over the next twenty years is highly probable. Given that drought-prone Georgia already uses a relatively high share of its land for residential purposes, future population growth will have a meaningful impact upon the supply of fresh water. As more and more faucets drain the aquifers, or underground reservoirs, urban sprawl paves over the land and short-circuits its absorption properties. Georgia’s fast-growing cities face water shortages by 2020 unless local utilities find new supplies.

Saving water will save you money.

Conserving water saves you money! Not only will your water bill go down, but as you heat less water, your gas or energy bill will also decline. If your whole community conserves, you will also pay less fees for water-related services. Water conserving communities will not need to pay as much to develop new supplies and expand or upgrade water and wastewater infrastructure.

 The City of Atlanta has approved a 12.5% rate increase effective July 1, 2009 and another 12% increase in 2010.  

Approved Water and Sewer Rates City of Atlanta

Water conservation helps preserve the environment.

Quite simply, water is the essential component of all life. It comprises 70% of the Earth’s surface and 75% of the human body. Of that 70% of surface water, only 1% is actually drinkable. Water is needed to keep the ecosystem in balance. Clouds need water to make rain. Plants need water to grow. Animals depend on plants for the oxygen they produce and the food they provide. When one element of the chain is compromised, the entire system is thrown out of whack. Roughly 46% of America’s lakes are too polluted for fishing, swimming or hosting aquatic life. 1.2 trillion gallons of untreated sewage, storm water, and industrial waste are discharged into US waters annually.

 There are many obvious reasons for us to protect our water supply, but the most important point to remember is that water is absolutely essential to all living things. Educate yourself, dedicate yourself, and you can make a difference.

(Source: http://www.luminant.com/scholar/docs/EnvironmentWater.pdf)

A significant level of water conservation can be achieved without major changes in lifestyle. Simply watering landscapes properly and utilizing efficient plumbing fixtures and appliances in the home can reduce the per-capita water use by 25 percent.

Canada, BC: Langley Township toilet rebate program

The program offers $125 to residents who replace old, high-water-use toilets with high-efficiency dual-flush toilets.

Water plan ready for second round

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Caroma toilets offer a patented dual flush technology consisting of a 0.8 Gal flush for liquid waste and a 1.6 Gal flush for solids. Caroma, an Australian company set the standard by giving the world its first successful two button dual flush system in the nineteen eighties and has since perfected the technology. Also, with a full 3.5 ” trapway, these toilets virtually never clog. All of Caroma’s toilets are on the list of WaterSense labeled HET’s http://www.epa.gov/watersense/pp/find_het.htm and also qualify for several toilet rebate programs available in the US. Please visit my blog https://pottygirl.wordpress.com/ to learn more or go to http://www.caromausa.com to learn where you can find Caroma toilets locally. Visit http://www.ecotransitions.com/howto.asp to see how we flush potatoes with 0.8 gallons of water, meant for liquids only. Best regards, Andrea Paulinelli

City of Toronto offers toilet rebate

Toronto’s goal is 15% reduction of water use by 2011. Reducing current residential and commercial water use will ensure that Toronto’s water system can meet the needs of a growing city. The City offers Toronto residents a $60 or $75 cash incentive to replace a water-guzzling toilet with a City-selected water-efficient model. Residents must live in detached houses, semis, duplexes (buildings with up to six units), individual condos and townhouses. Find detailed information and the application form here.

Toilets account for approx. 30% of water used indoors. By installing a Dual Flush toilet you can save between 40% and 70% of drinking water being flushed down the toilet, depending how old the toilet is you are going to replace.

If you are serious about saving water, want a toilet that really works and is affordable, I would highly recommend a Caroma Dual Flush toilet. Caroma toilets offer a patented dual flush technology consisting of a 0.8 Gal flush for liquid waste and a 1.6 Gal flush for solids. On an average of 5 uses a day (4 liquid/ 1 solid) a Caroma Dual Flush toilet uses an average of 0.96 gallons per flush.  The new Sydney Smart uses only 1.28 and 0.8 gpf, that is an average of 0.89 gallons per flush. This is the lowest water consumption of any toilet available in the US. Caroma, an Australian company set the standard by giving the world its first successful two button dual flush system in the nineteen eighties and has since perfected the technology. Also, with a full 3.5 trapway, these toilets virtually never clog. All of Caroma’s toilets are on the list of WaterSense labeled HET’s http://www.epa.gov/watersense/pp/find_het.htm and qualify for the rebate.  Please read my blog entry https://pottygirl.wordpress.com/2008/08/01/what-you-should-know-about-toilets/  to learn more or go to http://www.caromausa.com to learn where you can find Caroma toilets locally. Visit http://www.ecotransitions.com/howto.asp to see how we flush potatoes with 0.8 gallons of water, meant for liquids only

 

 

 

 

A toilet scam

COMMERCE, Calif. (KABC) — There’s a warning Monday about a so-called “toilet scam.” Someone has been going around claiming to represent local water officials. They tell residents there’s a new law requiring people to install “low-flow” toilets.

Read the full story here

Arnold offering rebate on low-flow toilets

Suburban Journals | News | Arnold offering rebate on low-flow toilets

Saving money while conserving a valuable natural resource is a pretty useful combination.

That’s what the city of Arnold is trying to promote with a new rebate program for “low flow” toilets.

The city is offering a $50 rebate toward installation of the water-saving toilets.

“Councilman (Phil) Amato and I devised this program to assist homeowners in making water conservation easy in their homes,” said Matt Unrein, city administrator. “A water saving toilet can save the average homeowner 20 percent in their total water usage.”

The program does have some restrictions.

Only residential single family and multifamily two, three and four family structures are eligible. Apartment complexes are not eligible.

New construction projects are also not eligible as state and federal law requires installation of low flow toilets in all new construction, according to Unrein.

The city also requires the following:

You must be a customer in the City of Arnold sewer district area.

You must purchase a 1.6 gallon low flow toilet from a business located within the corporate limits of the City of Arnold and install in a residence located within the same.

You must submit completed application along with original receipt and UPC/barcode from the box for low flow toilet.

City of Arnold personnel may request verification of installation.

After all requirements are met the rebate will be applied to the account noted on the application.

The rebate many only be applied to accounts in good standing.

The city has budgeted $20,000 from its sewer fund to pay for the rebate program.

For more information call 636-282-6600.

Chris Campbell

The toilet rebate form can be found here

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Toilet Rebate Programs in the US

More and more cities and municipalities are offering a rebate for the replacement of old, inefficient toilets with Low Flow or High Efficiency Toilets (HET) using 1.6 gallons or less per flush. I compiled this list to make it easier for you to find out if your city, county or water authority is participating in a rebate program. Please note that links to most authorities are included. I will try to keep adding more as they become available. If you know about programs I have not listed, please comment so I can add them.

Arizona

 California

 Colorado

 Florida

 Georgia

Hawaii

Massachusetts

Minnesota

 

Missouri

New Mexico

 

North Carolina

 Oregon 

 South Dakota

 Texas

 Virginia

 Washington

Wisconsin

King of the Hill – Flush with power!

Watch this episode of King of the Hill and see why you should opt for Caroma Dual Flush toilets! The Sydney 270 Easy Height Elongated is rated to flush 1000 grams (that is 2.2 lbs) of solid waste with one single flush, PLUS, with a 3.5″ trapway, our toilets won’t clog! Visit our YouTube site to watch how we flush potatoes with 0.8 gallons of water! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESOwyMAf-mk

http://www.casttv.com/shows/king-of-the-hill/flush-with-power/zse2g71