City of Griffin, GA offering $75 rebate for low flow toilets

Griffin has raised the rebate from $50 to $75 for residents who install new low flow toilets. Since the city initiated the toilet rebate program in 2009, only 35 residents have utilized the prog…

via City offering $75 rebate for low flow toilets.

City Seeking Applicants For High Efficiency Toilet Program | Corpus Christi, TX | KZTV10.com |

City Seeking Applicants For High Efficiency Toilet Program | Corpus Christi, TX | KZTV10.com |.

CORPUS CHRISTI – The City of Corpus Christi is looking for residents who want a new toilet, at no cost to them, but are willing to cover the costs of installation.

The High Efficiency Toilet (HET) program will use federal stimulus funds to provide 2,000 new toilets to qualified applicants. The fixtures use 1.28 gallons per flush, rather than the high volume 3.5 gallon toilets used by most residents.

The funds come from a $2,757,500 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant awarded to the city from the U.S. Department of Energy.

Residents selected will receive a voucher in the mail during the first week of September that is good for one HET and all associated installation hardware. The voucher will also identify the date, time, and location for pick-up of the HET which is scheduled for early fall. Residents are responsible for all costs associated with having the fixtures installed.

The toilets replaced by residents will be picked up by the City’s Solid Waste Operations Department. The city says the porcelain fixtures will be crushed and used to restore oyster reefs in local bays in partnership with Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi and Haas Materials.

To participate, homeowners can complete an application form athttp://www.CorpusChristiHET.com or by calling toll free 1-855-242-5214. Spanish speaking operators are available.

Mail-in applications are also available at the Corpus Christi Water Department located at 2726 Holly Road, at the Utility Business Office at City Hall, 1201 Leopard Street, or at any of the City’s public libraries.

To take a look at the types of toilets offered in the program, check out www.caromausa.com.

Population growth stirs worries about stress on region’s water supply | ajc.com

 

By Leon Stafford

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

When Colin Cavill began planning the 325-unit Enso Atlanta apartments near Grant Park three years ago, water was at the top of his mind.

Colin Cavill focused on water conservation when he developed the Enso Atlanta apartments in Grant Park, which, among other things, has a saltwater pool and a cistern for  rainwater harvesting that holds over 76,000 gallons.

Phil Skinner, AJC Colin Cavill focused on water conservation when he developed the Enso Atlanta apartments in Grant Park, which, among other things, has a saltwater pool and a cistern for rainwater harvesting that holds over 76,000 gallons.

 

Simply put: The metro’s area’s supply is limited, and he didn’t want to make matters worse.

So Cavill — who says his company, Capital 33, wanted to “help reduce our footprint” — developed the complex as a green project. Toilets and faucets are low-flow, shower heads are water-efficient, and a cistern collects water for the landscaping.

Cavill’s efforts may need to be become the norm as the state struggles with its limited water supply, experts say.

Metro Atlanta grew by 1 million people over the past decade, according to the U.S. census, and water — or lack thereof — could decide its continued strength as a region, the experts said.

“Growth goes where the water is and not vice versa,” said Gil Rogers, senior attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center.

Larry Neal, a senior principal for Mactec Engineering and Consulting, which has worked with the state on drinking water assessments, said a solution is critical for job growth. If water supply is stretched thin, it could be more expensive for business to tap. That could dissuade prospects from considering locating in metro Atlanta.

“If there is uncertainty,” he said, “it can cause a business to steer away. … You don’t want water to become the limiting factor in any given area.”

The state recognizes the risks. It has authorized the construction of reservoirs, created a Water Supply Task Force and adopted some conservation measures. Many cities and counties in the Metropolitan North Georgia Water Planning District, which includes metro Atlanta, are offering rebates to homeowners who replace older toilets with low-flow models.

One of the biggest challenges remains the state’s dispute with Alabama and Florida over access to Lake Lanier. U.S. District Judge Paul Magnuson ruled in 2009 that it was illegal for the Army Corps of Engineers to draw water from the lake to meet the needs of 3 million metro residents. Magnuson set a July 2012 deadline for the states to resolve the dispute. Otherwise, metro Atlanta would be limited to the same amount of water it received in the mid-1970s, when the population was less than one-third its current size. Georgia is appealing the ruling.

“Some of our issues are the litigation and uncertainty about the future,” said Pat Stevens, chief of environmental planning at the Atlanta Regional Commission.

Stevens said that despite the population growth, water use in metro Atlanta is down. She said the population in the North Georgia water district grew 28 percent between 2000 and 2009. Usage, however, was down to 512 million gallons of water a day in 2009, compared with a high in 2006 of 602 million gallons.

A number of factors led to the reduction, including conservation, severe water restrictions during several years of drought and the economic downturn, which may have forced residents to curtail tapping water they could not afford.

Also, 2009 was a rainy year, lessening the need to water yards and gardens.

“It really rained a lot that year. Actually the last year that was more close to our norm was in 2006,” Stevens said. The metro area’s rainfall was 69.4 inches in 2009 and 48.5 inches in 2006.

Alan Wexler, president of Databank Atlanta, a r, said if water were to become less abundant, it could lead to restrictions that would put commercial and residential real estate projects on hold. That happened in the years of drought in 2007 and 2008.

Solving the issue is critical because the economy has stymied real estate growth the past few years. When the recovery comes, no one wants to be sidelined because of water, he said.

“You have so many factors that are fluid right now,” he said.

Population growth stirs worries about stress on region’s water supply  | ajc.com.

Japan’s Toilets Are Cooler Than Yours

Japan’s Toilets Are Cooler Than Yours.

Japan takes care of business in style.

Japan offers a wide variety of cultural excitement for tourists and locals but you definitely wouldn’t expect to see something like the Inax Museums back in the states. Located in Tokoname, outside of Nagoya, visitors of the Inax Live Museum can see the most innovative, fancy and funky functional toilets out there.

 

Here we have Inax’s luxurious Regio toilet with an automatic lid, illuminated bowl, and the best part: its own soundtrack composed by famous Japanese jazz pianist Yoshiko Kishino. In addition, the toilet releases its own germ-killing ions to keep this expensive piece of porcelain clean. How expensive is the Regio? Well the cheapest one has a suggested retail price of 462,000 yen (that’s $5,500).

 

Don’t let the design of this one fool you, you won’t be washing your hands with dirty recycled toilet water. This common water-conservation feature, referred to as spigots, reuses water from the sink for toilet flushing. Now all of that water you waste washing your hands and brushing your teeth can be used to flush the toilet.

 

Another expensive toilet, the Toto Neorest Hybrid features a tankless design that conserves water by using three different flush buttons. One of the buttons using a water-saving 1 gallon flush. In addition to its water conserving powers, the Neorest Hybrid includes the company’s famous bidet system, an innovative cyclone flushing system, automatic flush and deodorizer, nightlight and of course a state of the art Kenwood sound system. This fancy flusher starts at around $2,800.

 

For a look at more creative toilet designs from Japan, head on over to CNET’s article here.

 

Photos : Tim Hornyak / CNET

 

Gainesville, GA Toilet rebate criteria change | AccessNorthGa

Toilet rebate criteria change | AccessNorthGa.

Toilet rebate criteria change

BY MARC EGGERS STAFF
GAINESVILLE – The criteria for the City of Gainesville Plumbing Retrofit Program has changed. 

Under the new guidelines, only high efficiency toilets that are 1.28 gallons per flush or less will be eligible for the credit offered by the Gainesville Public Utilities Department.

Under the retrofit program, any single-family residential customer, whose home was built prior to 1993, can replace older model toilets with new water efficient models and receive a $75.00 credit per toilet replaced. The credit is applied to the applicants’ City of Gainesville water bill.

The City of Gainesville was the first to offer a plumbing retrofit program in North Georgia and in the past has offered the credit for 1.6 gpf toilets.

These eligibility changes are due to measures passed by the legislature in the water stewardship act. These changes will take effect statewide in July 2012. However, to continue as a leader in water conservation, the City of Gainesville has opted to implement the changes this year.

A typical family of four can save around 35 gallons a day or 12,775 gallons a year by replacing one 3.5 gpf toilet with a 1.28 gpf toilet.

Rebate applications must be accompanied with an original receipt and can be found online at http://www.gainesville.org/public_utilities or the Public Utilities Building located at 757 Queen City Parkway, SW Gainesville, GA 30501. Please see application for complete details.

For more information contact Jennifer Flowers at (770) 532-7462, ext. 3287.

 

pottygirl’s blogging year 2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads This blog is on fire!.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A helper monkey made this abstract painting, inspired by your stats.

The average container ship can carry about 4,500 containers. This blog was viewed about 16,000 times in 2010. If each view were a shipping container, your blog would have filled about 4 fully loaded ships.

 

In 2010, there were 90 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 198 posts. There was 1 picture uploaded, taking a total of 171kb.

The busiest day of the year was May 3rd with 93 views. The most popular post that day was Who’s To Blame For The Great Pacific Garbage Patch? Look In The Mirror..

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were en.wordpress.com, greenhomeguide.com, search.aol.com, linkedin.com, and google.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for penta water scam, caroma toilet reviews, the great pacific garbage patch facts, water conservation, and water scams exposed.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Who’s To Blame For The Great Pacific Garbage Patch? Look In The Mirror. September 2009
1 Like on WordPress.com,

2

10 drinking water scams exposed November 2009
1 comment

3

Toilet Rebate Programs in the US February 2009
5 comments

4

Caroma Toilet Review | H2O Report October 2009

5

City of Raleigh, NC WaterSense toilet replacement rebate program June 2010
2 comments

It’s official: Atlanta is the first City in the Southeast offering a toilet rebate program for apartment buildings and condominiums

Mayor Kasim Reed officially announced the first Multi-Family toilet rebate program in the Southeastern United States during the City of Atlanta’s Sustainability Week, October 25-29, 2010. In his  “Power to Change” speech, he outlined how Atlanta plans to become one of the top-ten sustainable cities in the nation.

Below you will find the details on the Multi-family toilet rebate program – you can also visit  the following link for the rebate application. http://www.atlantawatershed.org/owe/multi-family-toilet-rebate.htm

Multi-family Toilet Rebate Program

The City of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management extends its high-efficiency toilet rebate to multifamily customers

Apartment and condominium communities that are City of Atlanta water customers may qualify if the following criteria are met:

  • The property was built prior to 1993
  • Existing toilets use more than 1.6 gallons per flush
  • Property owner/manager is up-to-date on water bill payments
  • Property owner/manager has water and sewer account with DWM
  • Property owner/manager agrees to a pre-installation water audit inspection by DWM
  • Property owner/manager purchases all fixtures and arranges for/pays for installation
  • Property owner/manager provides proof of purchase (original receipts) and proof of installation (plumber/contractor statement or invoice)
  • Property owner/manager contracts with a licensed waste hauler who will transport used porcelain toilets to one of two porcelain recyclers in the Atlanta area (documentation from recycler required)
  • Property owner/manager agrees to a post-installation verification site visit by DWM
  • Property owner/manager completes a multifamily toilet rebate application (which includes all documentation listed above)

If the above criteria are met, the property owner/manager will receive a $100 rebate for each toilet replaced with a 1.28 gallon-per-flush or less EPA WaterSense toilet. Look for the water sense label label.

Rebates will be applied to the water account(s) for the property in question.

Rebates will be applied to qualifying applicants on a first-come, first-served basis as long as funding is available.

For more information about the Multifamily Toilet Rebate Program, contact Jennifer Carlile, jcarlile@atlantaga.gov, (404) 546-1265.

Tucson Water continues rebate programs – KOLD News 13

Tucson Water continues rebate programs – KOLD News 13.

DeKalb residents could see water bills double

Source
AJC.com
By Megan Matteucci

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

A DeKalb County family’s water and sewer bill could increase 110 percent from 2009 to 2014 — and even more if the state declares a drought.

The upgrades are needed to help pay for $1.79 billion in capital improvements to DeKalb’s water system, Watershed Management director Francis Kung’u said.

“Our water and sewer infrastructure is aging,” Kung’u told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Wednesday. “If we don’t do this, it will continue to degrade. We will get more breaks and won’t have enough capacity of wastewater treatment. We won’t be able to support growth of the county.”

The county is proposing to raise water and sewer rates 16 percent each year through fiscal year 2014.

The County Commission already approved a 16 percent rate increase for fiscal years 2009 and 2010, but is now looking at the additional increases to cover the plant repairs.

For a family that uses 4,000-20,000 gallons a month, it means an increase of 110 percent in their bill. The maximum bimonthly bill that was $165 in 2009 would be $347 in 2014.

But some county commissioners fear that may be too much for some residents in DeKalb, where 10.4 percent are unemployed and 68 percent of students in the school system qualify for free or reduced meals.

“When you look at the proposed rate increases, it’s got me thinking about reality,” Commissioner Lee May said. “Regardless if you call it a tax or a fee, the realization is that it comes out of everyone’s pocket.”

A vote will likely not be taken until next month at the earliest, Commissioner Larry Johnson said.

The commission is waiting for more information on the water department’s staffing and budget before agreeing to approve the rates. Ninety of the department’s employees are leaving at the end of the month through an early retirement program, but the department wants to fill 70 of those positions.

Those workers are needed for daily water main breaks and other repair work, said Ted Rhinehart, deputy chief operating officer of infrastructure.

“Those are the workers who do the day-to-day functions,” he said. “It’s so we don’t make a bad situation worse. We know we have a lot of pipes to repair.”

That repair list could get much worse if the county doesn’t upgrade the water system, Kung’u said.

The $1.79 billion covers 83 different projects, including expanding the county’s two wastewater plants and adding more clean storage wells at the county’s one drinking water plant. DeKalb also must fund 48 percent of all upgrades to Atlanta’s R.M. Clayton Wastewater Treatment Plant, which the county shares with the city, Kung’u said.

DeKalb plans to issue $350 million in bonds this year, $733 million in fiscal year 2012 and $277 million in fiscal year 2014.

In addition to the water system upgrades, the increased rates are also needed to help offset a drop in revenue from mandatory water restrictions, Kung’u said.

In 2009, the drought restrictions caused DeKalb water use to drop about 7.5 percent, which resulted in a $28.3 million loss. The county expects to lose about $34.3 million this year because of the water restrictions.

To help prevent that problem in future years, the water department is proposing to raise rates even more if the state declares a drought. Kung’u is asking commissioners to add on a 5 percent increase if the governor declares a Level 2 drought, a 10 percent increase for a Level 3 drought and a 15 percent increase for a Level 4 drought.

“Over the next several years, everybody else will be adjusting rates,” Kung’u said. “But for now, we are still below average in the metro region.”

That region average includes the city of Atlanta, which has water rates that are about double the surrounding counties because of its sewer project, Kung’u said.

Atlanta has approved a 56 percent increase from 2008-2012. The rates are supposed to go up about 12 percent each year until June 2012. The city is also considering adding a stormwater fee, which could be as high as $120 a year for some homes.

Fulton approved a 15 percent water hike in May 2008 and has no plans to raise rates, according to Public Works Director Angela Parker.

Cobb is expected to reapprove water and sewer increases in November. Starting in January, water rates will go up 8 percent, and sewer rates will increase 4 percent.

Gwinnett County passed a resolution last year establishing water and sewer rate increases each January through 2015. Customers began paying $4.11 per 1,000 gallons of water this year, up 25 cents from 2009. The rate goes up to $4.38 in 2011. The same is true for sewer service. Gwinnett customers now pay $5.38 per 1,000 gallons, up 47 cents from last year. The rate rises to $5.89 at the first of next year.

Clayton County has no plans to raise water rates. In August 2009, it raised water rates by 6 percent for residents who use more than 3,000 gallons a month, said Clayton County Water Authority spokeswoman Suzanne Brown.

Cherokee County does not anticipate a rate increase, but the Woodstock City Council is considering raising rates as much as 13 percent.

Staff writers Jeffry Scott, Christopher Quinn, Janel Davis and Patrick Fox contributed to this article.

Water usage

DeKalb customers who use 0-4,000 gallons a month

Number of customers: 51,749

Percent of total customers: 32 percent

2010 bimonthly bill: $46

2012 bimonthly bill: $62

2014 bimonthly bill: $83

DeKalb customers who use 4,001-20,000 gallons a month

Number of customers: 100,723

Percent of total customers: 62 percent

2010 bimonthly bill: $192

2012 bimonthly bill: $258

2014 bimonthly bill: $347

*Bill amount is the maximum

Current average monthly water and sewer bill for a customer who uses 6,000 gallons a month

DeKalb: $51

Clayton: $53

Cobb: $54

Fulton: $56

Gwinnett: $60

Cherokee: $61

City of Atlanta: $121

Source: DeKalb County Watershed Management Department

REALTORS® Defeat Toilet Retrofit at Resale Ordinance, Pledge Support for Expanding Rebate Program

The Atlanta City Council has rejected a controversial proposal that would have linked a mandate to replace older toilets and plumbing fixtures to residential and commercial real estate transactions, which is commonly known as “retrofit at resale.”

via REALTORS� Defeat Toilet Retrofit at Resale Ordinance, Pledge Support for Expanding Rebate Program.

City of Sacramento, CA offers Rebate for Washing Mashines and High Efficiency Toilets

Source
http://www.msa2.saccounty.net/dwr/scwa/Documents/Media%20Room/Newsletter/WaterSpouts%20Spring%202010.pdf

High Efficiency Toilet Rebate

Rebates for High Efficiency Toilets (HET) are worth up to $175 for residential and $200 for commercial customers.
You must have a toilet flushing 3.5 gallons or greater to qualify. Homes and businesses built before 1992 that have original toilets would qualify.
Details here
http://www.msa2.saccounty.net/dwr/scwa/Documents/Media%20Room/Newsletter/WaterSpouts%20Spring%202010.pdf

Caroma’s contribution to community is remembered – Topix

Caroma’s contribution to community is remembered – Topix.

College Station, TX COMMERCIAL / MULTIFAMILY toilet rebate program

http://www.cstx.gov/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=7821

Receive 50% off MSRP on any Caroma toilet during the month of April

Start Saving. With one flush we can make a difference and save the most precious resource on earth! See below to learn more about how One Flush Can Make a Difference!

Please fill out this form to receive 50% off the MSRP of all Caroma toilets. There are no limits on the number of Caroma toilets you can purchase with this discount. Additional shipping charges may apply.

This promotion will run through the month of April in observance of Earth Day!

Can One Flush Make a Difference?

Absolutely! In the United States federal law requires that new toilets must not exceed 1.6 gallons of water per flush (gpf).The high efficiency toilet (HET) category has set a standard in North America with 1.28 gallons per flush (gpf). Caroma’s HET’s go even further: The average flush of the toilets in Caroma’s standard collection is 1.06 gpf, while the Smart Series features an industry breaking .96 gpf!

Just think. If just one person uses a high efficiency toilet for one year then they will save around 330 gallons of water (based on the average three times a day flush). Further, if your toilet is from the 1980s, when new toilets were regulated to use 3.5 gallons of water per flush, you would save 2,410 gallons per year by switching to a HET toilet! One flush CAN make a difference.

The numbers simply add up. If five people replaced their old 3.5 gpf toilet, over 12,000 gallons of water or the equivalent of 300, 20 minute showers would be saved. One flush does make a difference, but if 2,000 people with new toilets switched to a HET toilet, in one year you would be able to fill an Olympic sized swimming pool with the water saved: 660,430 gallons! If 822 people using the old 3.5 gpf toilets changed to a Caroma HET toilet, we could fill an Olympic pool with the water saved!

Caroma on the Today show!

Caroma’s Profile Smart and Sydney Smart™ appeared on NBC’s TODAY Show Monday, March 29, 2010. Green Gadget Guy, Steve Greenberg demonstrated Caroma’s dual flush capabilities by flushing a large potato and two limes with the half flush (0.8 gallons)!

http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/26184891/vp/36082618#36082618

Fort Collins, Co. offers $50.00 toilet rebate

Source:http://www.coloradoan.com/article/20100323/COLUMNISTS94/100322012/1024/lifestyle/Green-living-Reward-environment-and-yourself-by-saving-water-inside-and-out

Conserving water in our semi-arid region is vitally important to us all. Taking a few small actions to use water efficiently inside and out can make a big difference. All toilets are not created equally — some are thrifty while others are water-guzzlers.

 All toilets are not created equally — some are thrifty while others are water-guzzlers.

Pre-1994 toilets use 3.5 to 7 gallons per flush (gpf). Since toilets can last 25 years or more, many high water-using models are still in use. To help get those toilets out of service, Fort Collins Utilities is offering a rebate of up to $50 to install high-efficiency toilets.

Rebates are available for Utilities residential water customers who purchase qualified WaterSense labeled toilets that use 1.28 gpf or less. WaterSense products are certified by an independent laboratory to meet rigorous criteria for performance. You’ll receive a $35 rebate for the purchase of a qualifying toilet and an additional $15 for recycling your old one.

For more information on these rebates and other programs, visit fcgov.com/ FortCollinsConserves, e-mail ldaudney@fcgov.com, call               (970) 221-6877         (970) 221-6877 or TDD               (970) 224-6003         (970) 224-6003.