Caroma, Moen Recognized By WaterSense – Industry News – PMEngineer

Caroma, Moen Recognized By WaterSense – Industry News – PMEngineer.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense program presented high-efficiency, dual-flush toilet manufacturer Caroma with its inaugural Excellence Award for Caroma’s number of WaterSense-labeled products in the marketplace — all 47 of its floor-mount, dual-flush toilet models, more than any company in the industry. The company’s award-winning Smartflush toilets surpass both the U.S. federal requirement of no more than 1.6 gpf for new toilets, as well as the North American high-efficiency toilet standard of 1.28 gpf. 

The EPA made the presentation at the WaterSmart Innovations Conference in Las Vegas during its second annual WaterSense awards banquet Oct. 6, co-hosted with the Alliance for Water Efficiency. 

“We are deeply honored and grateful to receive an Excellence Award, and we are proud to be a leader in the effort to preserve the world’s most valuable resource,” said Derek Kirkpatrick, Caroma North America’s general manager. “Caroma has been a tireless supporter of sustainable technologies for more than 70 years, and we look forward to strengthening our commitment to changing the way bathroom water is used and conserved.”

 

 

WaterSense Partners Of The Year Named

The EPA also named four Partners of the Year for their exceptional efforts in promoting water efficiency and WaterSense-labeled products. The WaterSense program’s more than 2,000 partners help save water for future generations by promoting water efficiency and WaterSense-labeled products. 

“These partners contributed significantly to our efforts to make WaterSense-labeled products a household fixture in 2009,” said Peter S. Silva, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Water. “They also helped consumers who purchased these products save 36 billion gallons of water and more than $267 million in water and sewer bills in 2009.”

The partners of the year are: 

  • Manufacturer Partner of the Year: Moen. Bathroom fixture manufacturer Moen earned the WaterSense label for all of its 267 bathroom faucet fixtures, ensuring availability of water-saving faucets for consumers at every price point, and garnered significant national media attention for WaterSense.


  • Promotional Partner of the Year: Cascade Water Alliance, King County, Wash. Cascade Water Alliance collaborated with retailers and plumbers to promote water efficiency in the Puget Sound region and rebated more than 3,000 WaterSense-labeled toilets for households and local businesses.


  • Retailer Partner of the Year: Lowe’s Cos. Big-box retailer Lowe’s launched a “Build Your Savings” program to help customers select products that save energy, water and money, winning WaterSense Retail/Distributor Partner of the Year for the second year in a row.


  • Irrigation Partner of the Year: Judy Benson of Clear Water Products and Services (Clear Water PSI), Florida.Benson educated businesses and consumers on outdoor water efficiency and encouraged other irrigation professionals in the central Florida region to partner with WaterSense.


  • To learn more about the WaterSense awards winners, visit www.epa.gov/watersense.

    City of Raleigh, NC WaterSense toilet replacement rebate program

    Source: http://www.raleighnc.gov/portal/server.pt/gateway/PTARGS_0_2_306_202_0_43/http;/pt03/DIG_Web_Content/category/Resident/Water_and_Wastewater/Cat-1C-2009513-144902-WaterSense_Toilet_Replac.html

    Stop flushing money down the toilet! Toilets can use up to 30 % of indoor domestic water usage; older toilets can even use up to seven gallons in one flush!

    PROGRAM DATES: APRIL 4, 2009 – UNTIL FUNDS ARE EXHAUSTED

    The City of Raleigh is now offering WaterSense toilet rebates to ALL water customers of the following municipalities: Raleigh, Wendell, Garner, Rolesville, Knightdale, Zebulon, and Wake Forest. Toilet rebates up to $100, to cover the cost of each toilet, will be given for retrofitting an old toilet with an EPA WaterSense labeled toilets; installation fees will not be covered. WaterSense toilets are independently certified to be:

    • High Efficiency Toilets (HETs) using 20 percent less than the current federal standard of 1.6 gallons/flush
    • and of High performance quality

    To qualify, applicants must: 

    1. Be a residential or non-residential (commercial, industrial or institutional) customer of the following municipalities: Raleigh, Wendell, Garner, Rolesville, Knightdale, Zebulon, or Wake Forest 
    2. Be current in their bill and not owing past due fees.
    3. Record the measurements of their old toilet’s tank; these must be included in the application. Details are given in subsequent sections.
    4. Replace an old toilet, of 1.6 gallons or higher flush volume, with an EPA WaterSense labeled toilet. New toilet installations are not covered in this rebate nor are replacements for current WaterSense toilets.
    5. Include the original receipt(s) for the toilet(s) dated on or after April 4, 2009.
    6. Agree to a post-installation inspection to verify the toilet’s eligibility. Details are given in subsequent sections.

    * Rebate amount is determined by the cost of the toilet, tax included, with a maximum rebate of $100 per toilet. Installation fees are not eligible to be included for rebates. Rebates will be given as checks and not as credit on the water bill unless the water accounts are not current; then the rebate may be denied or given as a credit towards the water account.
    Old Toilet Information

    For verification of eligibility, and statistical and monitoring purposes, each applicant is required to provide the measurements of the old toilet’s tank.

    THE FOLLOWING MEASUREMENTS MUST BE RECORDED ON THE APPLICATION!

    Lift the tank lid and take three measurements, in inches, from inside the tank:

    A. Depth of the Water Level (from the bottom of the tank to the water line)

    B. Length (inside the tank, left to right)

    C. Width (inside the tank,  front to back)

    To determine how many gallons per flush (GPF) your toilet uses, multiply the three measurements together and divide by 231.

    If you currently have a water-displacing item within your tank, measure the water level with the item in place and make a note of having a water displacer in the comment section of the rebate application.
    GPF = (Length x Width x Water Depth)/231

    Purchasing A WaterSense Toilet

    WaterSense toilets come in many colors, heights, varieties and styles including: gravity flush, dual-flush, flapperless, pressure assisted flush and more!
    Toilets are either sold as a one-piece toilet or a two-piece (tank and bowl); only the EPA combinations listed qualify for the WaterSense label. A list of qualifying toilets, along with more information about the WaterSense program, is located at http://epa.gov/watersense/pp/find_het.htm; this list is updated periodically so stay tuned for new toilets!
    Remember to look for the WaterSense logo, pictured above, to ensure you are purchasing a toilet that qualifies for the City’s rebate program. WaterSense toilets are available at many are retailers including our Program supporters.

    What Application Will I Need?

    Is the applicant …

    1. Both the home owner and water account holder?

      YES = HOME OWNER APPLICATION

      NO, I rent or the water account is in the HOA’s name = OWNER-RENTER-HOA APPLICATION

    2. Business owner/manager?

      YES = BUSINESS APPLICATION

    3. Plumber who provided a direct rebate for the water account holder?

      YES = PLUMBER APPLICATION

    4. Property Manager?

      YES = PLEASE CONTACT PUBLIC UTILITIES FOR A CUSTOM APPLICATION!

    If there is any confusion about your eligibility, please contact the Public Utilities Department at (919) 857.4540.

    Verification of Installation

    The City of Raleigh reserves the right to inspect the installation of WaterSense labeled toilet(s) submitted for this rebate program. If the installation is provided by a licensed plumber, this inspection may not be necessary; however, THE APPLICANT MUST INCLUDE A COPY OF THE RECEIPT FROM THE LICENSED PLUMBER containing the following information:

    • Plumber’s contact details
    • Company name
    • NC license number
    • Installation date & location
    • Toilet’s brand and model numbers (must match the those on the application)

     

    Disposal
    All applicants must dispose of their old toilets properly. Toilets, from Raleigh residences, may be picked up for free as part of the City’s Bulky Load Pick-Up. For more information, call (919) 996-6890 or visit: www.raleighnc.gov/bulky. Leaving the old toilet at the curb without calling for a Bulky Load Pick-up may result in a fine by the City. Applicants not eligible for this service will need to make other disposal arrangements.

    Approval
    Rebate checks, and not credits, will be disbursed to approved applicants.
    These will be mailed to the address listed on the rebate application. Once an application has been approved, please allow 45 business days for the rebate check to be disbursed. Due to staff and resource constraints, not all applicants will be informed when their application is received or approved. Applicants will be notified when their application is unsuccessful or incomplete.

    Program Duration
    The program commenced April 7, 2009 and will be offered for one year or until rebate funds are spent. Program is subject to change or terminate at any time without prior notice. PENDING APPLICATIONS PROCESSED FOR THE REBATE PROGRAM AT THE TIME FUNDS ARE EXHAUSTED WILL BE DENIED AND THE APPLICANT WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO REIMBURSEMENT.

    Warranties And Representations
    THE CITY OF RALEIGH MAKES NO WARRANTIES OR REPRESENTATIONS THAT THE EPA’s WaterSense LABELED TOILETS SELECTED BY THE APPLICANT WILL PERFORM AS REPRESENTED BY ITS MANUFACTURER OR SELLER. THE CITY OF RALEIGH IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE WORK OF THE INSTALLER, WHETHER A LICENSED PLUMBER OR OTHERWISE.

    Documentation & Consents
    THE FOLLOWING DOCUMENTATION MUST BE SENT VIA FIRST CLASS MAIL:

    1. Receipts: Applications without receipts will not be processed.
    2. Written Consent: MAY BE REQUIRED when the applicant is:

    • Not the water account holder
    • A (residential or non) renter/tenant and not the owner
    • Licensed plumber who is not the water account holder

     

    Checklist

    1. Ensure accounts remain current.
    2. Obtain required consents.
    3. Record old toilet measurements.
    4. Purchase a WaterSense toilet(s).
    5. Complete the rebate application.
    6. Attach original/itemized receipt.
    7. Mail documents to Toilet Rebate Program address. APPLICANTS MUST COMPLETE ALL DETAILS ON THE APPLICATION AND MAIL IT AND THE ORIGINAL-DATED RECEIPT(S) TO:
      City of Raleigh
      c/o Toilet Rebate Program
      One Exchange Plaza, Suite 620
      Raleigh, NC 27601

    Program Supporters
    WaterSense toilets are now available at our local program supporters: Home DepotFerguson Bath, Lighting and Kitchen GalleryCarolina Decorative Plumbing and Streamline Plumbing & Electric.

    //

    The Story of Bottled Water

    The Story of Bottled Water by Madeline Ostrander, senior editor of YES! Magazine.

    Worried about what’s in your tap?

    That’s exactly what the water bottling industry hoped when it developed brands like Dasani, Perrier, and Poland Springs, which promise to be “natural,” “pure,” “clean,” even “sexy” alternatives to tap water.

    But the very companies that market those brands, like Nestlé and Coca Cola, are putting public water supplies in jeopardy in communities both in the United States and overseas. They’re selling us a product that is often not any cleaner than tap water, and is a lot pricier.

    Bottled water is a scam. The simplest way to understand why is to watch a new, short film released today by the creators of The Story of Stuff. Like its predecessor, The Story of Bottled Water uses simple language and surprisingly charming stick figures to walk you through the perils of the bottled water economy. “Bottled water costs about 2,000 times more than tap water,” says Annie Leonard, the film’s narrator and director. “Can you imagine paying 2,000 times the price of anything else? How about a $10,000 sandwich?”

    The Story of Bottled Water film still

    Bottled water often comes straight from the tap, sometimes with a little filtering, sometimes not. It is not necessarily safer. For instance, in 2004, the Coca-Cola company had to recall all of its Dasani water from the United Kingdom, after officials discovered the water exceeded the legal limit for bromate, a carcinogen. The Environmental Working Group recently tested 10 brands of bottled water—on average, they contained eight chemical pollutants, no better than tap water.

    But there’s something even more insidious about the way that the bottled water industry preys on our public water systems and tap water. Water is both the most basic of human needs and a product of nature. It can’t actually be manufactured, so bottling it up and selling it always means removing water from a public source. As the bottled water market has taken off, we’ve seen public water fountains begin to disappear. Meanwhile, citizens in rural towns have begun to take notice that water-bottling companies are trying to sell off water that actually belongs to them. Communities like Barnstead, New Hampshire have fought hard to keep Nestle from bottling and shipping away their local water.

    China’s Living Water Garden
    Photo essay: Chengdu’s most popular public park is is a 5.9 acre inner-city natural water treatment system.

    We’ve gotten used to thinking we have more than enough water to go around in this country, but it’s not true. According to experts like Peter Gleick, the United States is facing a water crisis that will only get worse in coming years. Already major water supplies like the Ogallala Aquifer and Lake Mead, which together supply water for millions across the Southwest and Great Plains, are in big danger of running dry. Climate change is going to alter everything we know about water—how much stays in our reservoirs, how much snow falls in the Sierras, how our rivers flow, and how much we have available to drink, irrigate our crops, and water our lawns. When we let a private company control, bottle, or sell our water—whether it’s Coca-Cola or the private water operator Thames—we’re giving up some measure of control over our health, environment, lives, and futures.

    In May, YES! Magazine will unveil a full issue about how to protect our water and keep it clean and accessible. You’ll read about radical breakthroughs in contentious Western water wars, about a community that bought its water back from private control, about farms that are learning how save water by taking care of soil, and about ways to get all the water you need, even if you live in the heart of the desert.

    In the meantime, you can celebrate World Water Day by watching The Story of Bottled Water, and read more about campaigns to protect water in our online and magazine coverage.


    Madeline Ostrander

    Madeline Ostrander is senior editor of YES! Magazine.

    Interested?
    Life, Liberty, Water by Maude Barlow
    A global water justice movement is demanding a change in international law to ensure the universal right to clean water for all.

    ecoTransitions Promotes EPA’s “Fix a Leak Week” March 15–21, 2010

    Marietta, GA—Because minor water leaks account for more than 1 trillion gallons of water wasted each year in U.S. homes, ecoTransitions is promoting “Fix a Leak Week,” March 15 through 21, 2010. Fix a Leak Week is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) WaterSense® program as an annual reminder to Americans to check household plumbing fixtures and irrigation systems for leaks.

    “Leaks can add up to more than 10,000 gallons of water wasted at home every year—that’s enough to fill a backyard swimming pool,” said Andrea Paulinellli, CEO and President. “ecoTransitions is participating in Fix a Leak Week to help homeowners save money on their utility bills and to help save water in our community and for future generations. Atlanta may lose its rights to access water from Lake Lanier in 2012. If that is the case, Georgia must undertake the difficult — and costly — process of either living on less or finding more water. By replacing old, water-guzzling fixtures in our households, we can make a great start in reducing our indoor water use by up to 50 percent.”

    To help consumers here in Georgia and across the country save water, ecoTransitions and WaterSense are promoting ways to identify and repair dripping faucets, running toilets, and leaky showerheads. In most cases, fixture replacement parts pay for themselves quickly and can be installed by do-it-yourselfers, your favorite handy person, plumber, or WaterSense irrigation partner. Following are a few water-saving tips:

    • Reduce faucet leaks by checking faucet washers and gaskets for wear and, if necessary, replace the faucet with a WaterSense labeled model. 
    • Leaky toilets are most often the result of a worn toilet flapper. Replacing the rubber flapper is a quick fix that could save a home with a constantly running toilet up to 200 gallons of water per day. If the leaky toilet uses 3.5 gallons per flush, replace it with a High Efficiency Toilet and save hundreds of Dollars per year. 
    • For a leaky garden hose, replace the nylon or rubber hose washer and ensure a tight connection to the spigot using pipe tape and a wrench. 
    • Landscape irrigation systems should be checked each spring before use to make sure they are not damaged by frost or freezing. 

    If homeowners have to replace a plumbing fixture, ecoTransitions reminds them to look for the WaterSense label. WaterSense labeled toilets, faucets, and (soon) showerheads have been independently tested and certified to save water and perform as well as or better than standard models. For more information on Fix a Leak Week, visit www.epa.gov/watersense/fixaleak.

     

     
     
     

     

    About ecoTransitions Inc Located in Marietta, Georgia, near Atlanta, ecoTransitions is a supplier for WaterSense labeled Caroma Dual Flush toilets. These High Efficiency Toilets (HET’s) qualify for the $100 Toilet rebate available in most Metro Atlanta Counties.  On the Web: http://www.ecotransitions.com , Email: sales@ecotransitions.com, Phone: (678) 313-9260.

    ###

    WaterSense, a partnership program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, seeks to protect the future of our nation’s water supply by offering people a simple way to use less water. For more information on WaterSense, and for a full list of labeled products and WaterSense irrigation and builder partners, visit www.epa.gov/watersense.

    Local contractors rejoice as statewide Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Programs

    Local contractors rejoice as statewide Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Programs

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    10 drinking water scams exposed

    The following information was provided by Pete Van Cleave, Water for Life http://www.waterforlifeonline.com/

    Everybody is susceptible to being scammed, simply because they want to believe!

    Nowhere is this more obvious than in the drinking water business. Politics spawns a lot of lies in the water business since the government is responsible for making tap water. Franchising and exclusive territories also spawn lies.  The internet has spawned much nonsense, too, with it’s uncensored, wild west sort of approach to business. It is truly alarming to see the explosion of internet products claiming to infuse water with magical properties to cure all your ills. These specially altered waters claim to be superior because they’re wetter, oxygenated, clustered, enhanced, magnetized, energized, alkalized, vitalized, or some other pseudoscientific term.  These empty promises simply do not hold water.

    We always look for scientific and verifiable data from reliable third parties than can provide the proven facts about the various treatment technologies and how pure water works to support good health.  Education is the only way to battle bogus claims. I have studied water for 20 years and I stand firm in my commitment to bring you the very best possible drinking water and water purification systems based upon the best information available.

    Distillation is the only method to produce legally purified water

    Since 2002, it is one of three methods to produce legally purified water.  Competitors only selling one thing tend to defend it well, but also get their blinders on regarding other advances.  Biopure Everclean Reverse Osmosis also produces microbiologically pure water according to the NSF without electricity. We believe independence protects consumers best.

    Common Reverse Osmosis works as well as NSF Nano filter/Everclean Rinse Reverse Osmosis

    Common Reverse Osmosis systems degrade from day one like a filter does. Microbiological contaminants often migrate through the membrane or o-rings. Everclean Rinse Reverse Osmosis prevents the membrane from degrading and keeps the water 100% consistently pure. It costs more, but the value is there because the membrane does not have to be replaced like it does with common RO.  The NSF Nano filter technology gives a non electric system barrier protection against all forms of bacteria for those undergoing chemotherapy, organ transplant, or HIV/Aids.

    Throwaway bottles are not a problem because they break down in the landfill.

    There is an area of floating plastic trash in the Northern Pacific ocean that is twice the size of the continental United States. Experts tell us that dangerous chemicals from industrial waste stick to the plastics and enter the food chain as it is ingested by birds and marine life.  Americans bought about 50,000,000,000 plastic bottles in 2006 and the cost of energy and pollution is staggering! It takes enough crude oil to fuel 100,000 cars for a year to make a year’s supply of those plastic bottles. It takes 1000 years for these bottles to break down 100%.

    Energized, vitalized, living, hexagonal, activated, ionized, and restructured water is purported to slow aging, restore cellular balance, or raise consciousness, and promote world peace.

    All scams and hoaxes supported by testimonial evidence which only tries to take advantage of feel good placebo marketing. Absolutely no third party testing or science supports this.

     Oxygenated water enhances performance and post recovery workout.

    The grossly overpriced Penta water is priced at $15.00 per gallon.  Perfect water by Amway is priced at $36.00 per case. Infused with 30- 40% more oxygen than ordinary water, it is marketed on the premise that the body can actually absorb oxygen directly into the bloodstream via the digestive system. The only way to get oxygen into the blood is through the lungs.  Trying to get oxygen into your body from water is called “drowning”! Unless you have gills, there is no need to search out water with extra oxygen.  This is a case of pure fraud without physiologic foundation.

     Clustered water is the fountain of youth.

    Each year, university researchers on human aging bestow their annual “Silver Fleece” award on anti-aging quackery.  The 2002 recipient was “clustered” water. Water only really clusters when it crystallizes during freezing.

    Magnetic water can cure all manner of human ailments.

    There is no scientific evidence that water can even be magnetized in the first place.  This scam is at odds with the fundamental laws of physics.

    Advanced filters can protect you as well as legal purifiers

    Filters do not protect against microbiological or inorganic contaminants. They are often not changed properly, they break down, they dump, they channel, and they produce a declining level of performance the older they get. I often test the water coming out of them worse than the water going into them because they have no automatic shutdown devices.

     Cheap spring or national brand water in 16.9 oz bottles is the answer to tap water problems.  

    Teton Springs, Quibell, Lithia Springs, and Big Springs are all local springs that have gone out of business in Georgia in the past 15 years because they failed to protect their customers from microbiological contamination in their water. Crystal Springs, Dasani, and Aquafina have all been cited for contaminants in their water in the past 8 years. We have tested our water against Deer Park, Zephyr Hills, Nestle Pure Life, Crystal Geyser, and every cheap brand sold in the state of Georgia. They all test out with contamination higher than tap water.

    Municipal water systems are still keeping our drinking water safe.  Every system using chlorine contains the cancer causing agent trihalomethanes.  63% of waterborne illnesses in the U.S. are directly caused by Cryptosporidium and Giardia cysts, which are city water chlorine tolerant.  Flouride is ineffective and has serious health risks.  The American Dental Association is now warning parents not to use fluoridated water in the preparation of formula. After so many “boil water” alerts, chemical spills, broken water mains, and now AP’s pharmaceutical expose, Municipalities and states are now spending $63 billion dollars a year to try to keep up, but they can’t.  Legal testing requirements and repairs are currently routinely granted waivers. Many municipalities are using the exact same technology that has been in place for 100 years.  TDS levels, by my own testing are double what they were 20 years ago.  Standards are getting tougher as we find out new scientific facts and more contaminants are being discovered.  For example, in January 2006, the standard for Arsenic was reduced from 50 PPB to 10 PPB.  That means the previous standard was off by 500 percent! The distribution system is completely laden with problems: over 237,000 water main breaks in 2006.  The distribution system is coated with dangerous layers of mineral, biological, and chemical deposits that recontaminate the water as it travels in pipes from treatment plant to homes.  We now have over 2100 chemical contaminants in the drinking water that we can test for but we don’t. The EPA estimates there is a gap of $22 billion per year between what is needed and what is done. The fact is that in the next 30 years, every city water supply in the U.S. will reach or exceed it’s expected lifetime, costing the American taxpayer somewhere near $300 billion just to fix the underground pipes. 

    Respectfully,

    Pete Van Cleave

    Water for Life

    (770) 578-0600

     

    Save Water While Saving Money—Georgia Sales Tax Holiday Features WaterSense® Labeled Products

    If you’re planning to buy a toilet or bathroom sink faucet this fall, timing your purchase to coincide with Georgia’s sales tax holiday for WaterSense labeled products can help you save a little money. Between October 1 and October 4, 2009, customers will not have to pay sales tax on toilets and bathroom sink faucets and accessories that have earned the WaterSense label. Consumers can be sure that products with the WaterSense label have been independently certified to meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) rigorous criteria for water efficiency and performance. 

    Purchasing and installing WaterSense labeled products is a key way Georgians can save water. If just one out of every four households in Georgia would retrofit their bathrooms with WaterSense labeled bathroom fixtures, it could save nearly 10 billion gallons per year—enough for every Georgian to take a shower daily for about two months. 

    Whether remodeling a bathroom, constructing a new home, or simply replacing older, inefficient fixtures that waste money and water, consider installing a WaterSense labeled toilet or bathroom sink faucet. 

    As consumers shop for WaterSense labeled toilets during the sales tax holiday, they can be sure these fixtures use 20 percent less water than the current federal standard for toilets and that WaterSense labeled bathroom sink faucets and accessories will reduce a sink’s water flow by 30 percent or more. Because all products must be tested to meet EPA’s criteria before earning the WaterSense label, these water savings are achieved without sacrificing performance. 

    The sales tax holiday on WaterSense labeled products will start Thursday, October 1 at midnight and will continue through the weekend until 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, October 4.  Any WaterSense labeled product purchased for noncommercial home or personal use during the sales tax holiday will be Georgia state sales tax-free. 

    For more information on the sales tax holiday, visit Conserve Water Georgia.

    For more information on WaterSense, please visit www.epa.gov/watersense

    For more information on WaterSense labeled, High Efficiency Toilets, please contact GA’s largest seller of the award-winning Caroma Dual Flush toilets, ecoTransitions. All of Caroma’s 47 floor mounted models also qualify for the $100 toilet rebate offered by most Metro Atlanta Water authorities. For more information, visit http://www.ecotransitions.com/ or contact them via email at sales@ecotransitions.com or by phone at (678) 313-9260. ecotrans_watersense_partner logo

    Sales Tax holiday in Georgia October 1-4, 2009

    October 1-4, 2009

    A culture of conservation is growing in Georgia.

    We are responsible for the stewardship of our state’s natural resources. Incorporating energy and water conservation practices into our daily lives benefits everyone in our state now and for generations to come. And small changes can make a big impact in our pocketbooks. To help make those changes a little easier, Georgia is offering the ENERGY STAR® and WaterSense® Sales Tax Holiday, Oct. 1-4, 2009.

    During the sales tax holiday, you can purchase ENERGY STAR-qualified or WaterSense-labeled products up to $1,500 without paying sales tax. In addition to the up-front cost savings, purchasing and installing more-efficient appliances and products can reduce in-home utility costs and improve both energy and water conservation.

     

    ENERGY STAR®

    ENERGY STAR products meet strict energy efficiency guidelines set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy. These appliances, electronics and lighting operate while using less energy – and less money – than older models.

    Americans, with the help of ENERGY STAR, prevented 43 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions in 2008 alone – equivalent to the annual emissions from 29 million vehicles – and saved more than $19 million on their utility bills. By looking to ENERGY STAR for best practices and products, households can reduce their energy use and save about one-third, or $750 annually, on their utility bills, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

     

    WaterSense®

    WaterSense, a national program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, makes it easy to find water-efficient products. Toilets, faucets and other products that are independently certified to meet U.S. EPA criteria for water effi­ciency and performance can earn the label.Look for WaterSense labeled products

    The average household spends as much as $500 per year on its water and sewer bill. By installing WaterSense-labeled fixtures and ENERGY STAR-qualified appliances that use water more efficiently, a household could save about $170 per year. If just one out of every four households in Georgia retrofit their bathrooms with WaterSense-labeled fixtures, it could save nearly 10 billion gallons of water per year – enough for every Georgian to take a shower daily for about two months.

    For more information on ENERGY STAR, please visit http://www.gefa.org/Index.aspx?page=352

    For more information on WaterSense, please visit http://www.conservewatergeorgia.net/documents/ waterSense_taxHoliday.html

    Toilet rebate in Seattle, WA – only during the month of September 2009

    Source Komo News

    Pay close attention to your water bill. A new rebate program could mean extra money in your pocket.

    Seattle Public Utilities is partnering with 17 local water districts and six local retailers in a program aimed at conserving water and helping consumers save money.

    September water bills include a $30 instant rebate coupon for replacing water-guzzling toilets with newer high-efficiency models.

    Only certain toilets qualify. They must carry an EPA WaterSense label and use only 1.28 gallons per flush.

    Turns out more than half the households in this area – 52 percent – still have toilets that use twice the water needed to do the job.

    Toilets made before 1982 use 5 to 7 gallons per flush (GPF). Toilets made from 1982 to 1993 use 3.5 gallons. In 1994 the requirement dropped to 1.6 gallons.

    The 1.28 GPF models have been around since about 2006.

    Depending on your water and sewer rates, switching from a high GPF toilet to a high-efficiency 1.28 GPF model can lower your water bill by $30 to $100 a year- maybe even more.

    According to Seattle Public Utilities, a Seattle family of four who flushes 20 times a day with a 3.5 GPF toilet pays $420.58 a year. With a 1.28 GPF model, the bill drops to $160.81 for an annual savings of nearly $260.

    The rebate program runs through the month of September.

    For participating water districts and retailers, click here.

    Flushing potatoes at the Sweetwater 420 Festival 2009 in Atlanta

    created by Creative Artists, Monroe, GA

    Revised Draft Water-Efficient Single-Family New Home Specification – Public comment period until July 7

    Source http://www.epa.gov/watersense/specs/homes.htm

    Update

    EPA will conduct a public meeting on June 10, 2009 from 8 am – 5 pm (Eastern Time) at the Holiday Inn Capitol – Washington, DC . To register for the meeting, please fill out and submit the Water-Efficient Single-Family New Home Public Meeting Registration Form by June 3, 2009.

    EPA will hold an additional public Webinar on June 22, 2009 from 1 pm – 4 pm (Eastern Time) for those unable to attend the Washington, DC meeting. To register for the Webinar, please fill out and submit the Water-Efficient Single-Family New Home Public Meeting Registration Form by June 17, 2009.

    Revised Specification Information

    EPA released a draft specification for water-efficient single-family new homes on May 22, 2008. Based on substantial feedback and significant revisions, EPA released a revised draft specification on May 8, 2009.

    This specification establishes the criteria for water-efficient new homes under EPA’s WaterSense program. When finalized, it will be applicable to newly constructed single-family homes and townhomes, three stories or less in size.

    In addition, to meet the Landscape Design Criteria (Section 4.1.1), the builder may choose to comply by completing a water budget. EPA has developed a tool to guide these calculations. The first version of the tool, released on November 20, 2008, was based on methodology developed by the irrigation industry as described in Irrigation Association’s Landscape Irrigation Scheduling and Water Management (2005). This second version incorporates additional research and recommendations suggested by stakeholders as part of the public comment process.

    The third-party verification of WaterSense labeled new homes is intended to confirm that the builder has met the criteria of EPA’s specification for water-efficient single-family new homes. The inspection and irrigation audit guidelines explains how inspectors verify that the criteria have been met and must be followed in conjunction with the specification. These guidelines have been revised to incorporate revisions to the specification criteria and methods by which they will be tested.

    EPA is interested in obtaining input from all interested parties on the revised draft specification materials. The public comment period is open for 60 days and ends on July 7, 2009. Please send any comments or suggestions regarding the revised draft specification materials to <watersense-newhomes@erg.com>. All comments become a part of the public record.

    In order to facilitate the consistency and utility of comments received, please submit your comments using the Template for Public Comment Submission (MS Word) (1 pp, 50K). You may either download and save this document template and directly insert your comments, or attach your comments in your own document, provided that you clearly reference the text/section in question, your recommended changes, and why you think these changes are needed.

    Additionally, WaterSense will be conducting a public comment meeting in June 2009. Additional information will be posted as it becomes available.

    For more information about the water-efficient single family new home specification process, including the first draft, public comments, and EPA’s response to the public comments of the specification and water budget tool, please see the Water-Efficient Single-Family New Home Specification Background Materials page.

    Fix a Leek Week

    fix a leak week

    Every Drop Counts

    More than 1 trillion gallons of water are wasted in U.S. homes each year from easy-to-fix leaks. That’s why ecoTransitions is participating in Fix a Leak Week, March 16 to 20, 2009, and we encourage you to join us.

    Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) WaterSense® program, this week is an opportunity to improve the water efficiency of your homes by checking for and fixing leaks, which waste an average of 11,000 gallons of water per home each year. That’s more than enough water to fill up a backyard swimming pool!  

    Here’s how to identify and address leaks around your home:  promolabel_blue_look

    • Check your water meter before and after a two-hour period when no water is being used. If the meter changes at all, you probably have a leak.           
    • To determine if you have a leak, now is a great time to check water usage. If a family of four exceeds 12,000 gallons per month in the winter, you probably have leaks! 
    • Search for toilet leaks by placing a drop of food coloring in the toilet tank. If any color shows up in the bowl without flushing first, you have a leak. (Be sure to flush immediately to avoid staining the tank.) 
    • If you decide it’s time for a new commode or faucet, look for WaterSense labeled products, which use 20 percent less water and perform as well or better than standard models. The vast majority of leaks can be eliminated after retrofitting a household with new WaterSense labeled fixtures and other high-efficiency appliances.

    Faucets and Showerheads:

    • A leaky faucet that drips at the rate of one drip per second can waste more than 3,000 gallons per year. A home with WaterSense labeled toilets could use that water to flush for six months!
    • You can reduce faucet leaks by checking faucet washers and gaskets for wear and replacing them if necessary. If you are replacing a faucet, look for the WaterSense label.
    • A showerhead leaking at 10 drips per minute wastes more than 500 gallons per year. That’s enough water to wash 60 loads of dishes in your dishwasher.
    • Most leaky showerheads can be fixed by ensuring a tight connection using pipe tape and a wrench.   

    Toilets:

    • If your toilet is running constantly, you could be wasting 200 gallons of water or more every day.
    • If your toilet is leaking, the cause is most often an old, faulty toilet flapper. Over time, this inexpensive rubber part decays, or minerals build up on it. It’s usually best to replace the whole rubber flapper-a relatively easy, inexpensive do-it-yourself project that pays for itself in no time.
    • If you do need to replace the entire toilet, look for a WaterSense labeled model. If a family of four replaces its older, inefficient toilets with new WaterSense labeled ones, it could save more than 16,000 gallons per year. Retrofitting the house could save the family approximately $2,000 in water and wastewater bills over the lifetime of the toilets.

    Outdoors:

    • An irrigation system should be checked each spring before use to make sure it was not damaged by frost or freezing.
    • An irrigation system with pressure set at 60 pounds per square inch that has a leak 1/32nd of an inch in diameter (about the thickness of a dime) can waste about 6,300 gallons of water per month.
    • To ensure that your in-ground irrigation system is not leaking water, consult with a WaterSense irrigation partner who has passed a certification program focused on water efficiency.
    • Check your garden hose for leaks at its connection to the spigot. If it leaks while you run your hose, replace the nylon or rubber hose washer and ensure a tight connection to the spigot using pipe tape and a wrench. 

    As a WaterSense partner concerned with preserving our nation’s water supply, ecoTransitions can help you learn more. Use our water savings calculator to determine how much water you can save by installing a Caroma Dual Flush toilet.  

     

    Learn More 

    Fix a Leak Week is March 16 to 20, 2009. Grab a wrench or contact your favorite handy person, plumber, or WaterSense irrigation partner to address leaking toilets, faucets, and irrigation systems around your home. Visit the WaterSense Web site to learn more. 

     

    About EPA’s WaterSense Program

    WaterSense is a partnership program sponsored by EPA. Its mission is to protect the future of our nation’s water supply by promoting and enhancing the market for water-efficient products and services. Currently, there are nearly 250 WaterSense labeled toilets, 500 labeled faucets and faucet accessories, and more than 550 certified irrigation partners. WaterSense labeled products must achieve independent, third-party testing and certification to prove they meet EPA’s rigorous criteria for efficiency and performance.

    CITY OF SAVANNAH NOW ACCEPTING PROPOSALS FOR waterSmart LANDSCAPE CHALLENGE

    SAVANNAH, Ga. – Jan. 22, 2009 – The City of Savannah is seeking proposals for the w aterSmart Landscape Challenge to develop a sustainable, water-efficient garden for Bryan Square on Hutchinson Island a s part of an overall effort by the city and state of Georgia to show residents how to create and maintain landscapes that use less water.

     

    All design proposals must be received by Feb. 27, and all participants must hold a valid Georgia business license in at least one county.   The winning designer will be awarded a $35,000 contract with the City of Savannah to install the garden in Bryan Square .

     

    Bryan Square is located on Hutchinson Island and sits between the ferry landing and the entrance to the new Savannah International Trade and Convention Center, where thousands of visitors arrive each year. The property is also part of the Savannah Harbor at Hutchinson Island development, which will rely significantly on reclaimed water for landscaping needs.   

     

    “There is a tremendous amount of creative talent within Georgia ’s landscape design industry,” said Laura Walker, administrator of Savannah ’s Environmental Affairs Department. “The designs submitted for the Challenge will not only promote water-efficient landscaping, they will also provide a wonderful showcase for new ideas that can be translated into residential gardening.”

     

    “Maintaining beautiful lawns and gardens requires much less water than most people realize. Overwatering harms plants and wastes a valuable community resource,” said Deron Davis, director of the waterSmart program for the state Environmental Protection Division. “By creating waterSmart landscapes, homeowners can significantly reduce their water consumption – and their water bills.”

     

    About half of the water used in a single-family home during the course of the year will be used on landscaping, and much of that water is lost due to evaporation or runoff caused by overwatering, according to research.  

     

    The waterSmart Landscape Challenge’s main objectives are to promote water conservation and education, while highlighting the creative potential of waterSmart landscape principles, specifically selecting plants that suit the location and minimizing the use of fertilizers and pesticides.   The selection of the right plants used in the right places will yield landscapes that, once established, can be maintained with little or no supplemental watering.

     

    In order to maximize public awareness of water-efficient landscaping and irrigation techniques, proposals will be evaluated in a two-stage process.   In the first round, a panel comprised of landscaping professionals and knowledgeable representatives selected by the city of Savannah will select between two and four top designs.   In the second round of judging, residents of Savannah and across the state will select the final design through a period of online voting.   Installation will occur according to the city of Savannah ’s needs, and will be paid for through a contract with the city.   

     

    The city of Savannah is working in partnership with the waterSmart program of the Environmental Protection Division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. A Request for Proposal, which includes rules and site information, can be obtained online at www.ci.savannah.ga.us .

     

    About WaterSmart

    waterSmart is an education program designed to give Georgians the information they need to successfully conserve water. Developed by the Cobb County-Marietta Water Authority in 2000 for residents in its service area, the Georgia Environmental Protection Division began using the waterSmart brand in communications and education activities in 2006 to help residents statewide understand how to maintain their landscapes while using less water. The State waterSmart program was piloted in six communities in 2007 and went statewide through a partnership with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in 2008.   For more information, please visit www.conservewatergeorgia.net .

     

    First WaterSense® labeled new home in the Nation built by Vanguard Homes

    Source: CarolinaNewswire.com

    Chapel Hill, NC — NC’s leading Energy Star builders, Anderson Homes and sister company Vanguard Homes, continue to lead the way in “green” innovation. -Chosen as one of only 7 builders in the country to participate in the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) WaterSense new homes pilot program, Vanguard Homes has received the first ever WaterSense label on a new home. WaterSense labeled new homes by Vanguard will be designed to be at least 20 percent more water efficient than homes currently being built under traditional standards, saving homeowners more than 10,000 gallons of water per year. These homes are designed to use significantly less water inside and out, through efficient plumbing fixtures, hot water delivery, appliances, landscape design, and irrigation systems.

    The first WaterSense labeled new home built by Vanguard Homes is located in the community of Briar Chapel in Chapel Hill, NC. This “Sensibly Green Concept Home” is the first home in the country to receive the EPA WaterSense label and has achieved gold level certification from the Green Home Builders of the Triangle and National Home Builder’s Association Green Building Standard.

    “This kind of WaterSense label is a milestone for us as a builder and leader in the industry, and we strive to achieve that kind of excellence every day,” says Kip Guyon, President of Vanguard Homes. “It is so important to maximize homesite integrity, while minimizing environmental impact”, he also added. Vanguard Homes’ WaterSense labeled new home conserves water by using WaterSense labeled dual flush toilets, bathroom faucets and high-efficiency shower heads. In addition ENERGY STAR® rated clothes washers, dishwashers, a whole house filtration system and a hot water circulation pump work in harmony to save water.

    WaterSense was created by the U.S. EPA in 2006 to help Americans save water for future generations. WaterSense labeled new homes, while saving water resources as well as money for the homeowners, also lessen the stress on water and wastewater infrastructure systems across the country.

    For more information/education of the importance of WaterSense labeled new homes by Vanguard Homes, please visit http://www.epa.gov/watersense/.

    To learn more about Vanguard Homes, visit http://www.VanguardHomesNC.com

    January is National Radon Month. What is Radon?

    Living “green” is about more than just energy efficiency and recycling – it’s also about giving your family a healthier home.  Breathing “greener” air means checking your home for radon, a leading indoor air problem that is the second leading cause of lung cancer.  Breathing in high levels of radon indoors can lead to lung cancer yet it is easily preventable.  A simple home radon test can tell you if you have a problem. If your home does have a high radon level, there are simple ways to reduce this radioactive gas and make your home’s air safer.

    Check out this article EPA: One in 15 Homes in Virginia Have Elevated Levels of Radon

    Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.It is a colorless, tasteless, odorless radioactive gas that enters your home through cracks and crevices in the foundation.   Decomposition products attach to very small particles in the air which then can be breathed into the lungs, potentially resulting in serious health consequences. National statistics indicate that one in fifteen homes in the U.S. have unacceptable levels of radon. ANY house can contain elevated levels of radon unless there is a functioning radon system in place. It’s not a sign of a bad builder – shifting and settling happens. The only way to know whether your house has unacceptable levels of radon is to have the lowest livable space in the home tested. You may test yourself using kits that are available at home supply stores or seek professional assistance. Winter is the best time to test since doors and windows are kept closed allowing radon concentrations to reach detectable levels. If radon occurs as a result of out gassing from the soil, the most common reason, it can be readily mitigated with ventilation for roughly $1,000. Removal technology is simple and straightforward. It involves blocking points of entry into the lowest livable space in the home and venting areas to the outside using an active circulation system to exhaust basement air. Usually plastic ducting and piping are sufficient, and these low-cost materials help keep total costs low. In a few rare cases, it has been discovered that foundations were made of radioactive mine tailings or other waste materials. In these situations, the costs of radon mitigation become substantially more than $1,000.

    More Articles on This Topic:U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Indoor Air – Radon, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: A Citizen’s Guide to Radon 

    This is a Press release from the EPA

    Release date: 01/05/2009

    Contact Information: Bonnie Smith, 215-814-5543, smith.bonnie@epa.gov

    PHILADELPHIA (January 5, 2009) – – Radon doesn’t have to be the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. By testing for radon and taking any needed preventive steps you can protect yourself and your family from this health threat.
    Radon comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water. It is an invisible, tasteless, radioactive gas that can become trapped indoors. When you breathe air containing radon, you are exposing yourself to the second leading cause of lung cancer. Radon is found all over the country and in any type of building including homes, offices, and schools. Because we spend most of our time indoors at this time of year, this is the best time to test our homes for radon.

    While many health challenges are tough to solve and expensive, testing for radon is easy and inexpensive. For $20 you can buy a “do-it-yourself” radon test kit at a hardware store or retail outlet. Many of us had our homes tested when they were purchased, but that may have been 20 years ago. EPA recommends you get your home tested every five years, since foundations can shift over time.

    If your test shows high levels of radon, confirm with another test and fix the problem. A high radon level might be lowered with a straight-forward radon venting system installed by a contractor. Mitigation costs generally run from $1,000 to $2,500. In new homes, builders can easily and economically include radon-resistant features during construction, and home buyers should ask for these. EPA also recommends that home buyers ask their builder to test for radon before they move in.

    EPA estimates that one in 15 homes will have a radon level of four picocuries per liter of air or more, a level the agency considers high. Based on the national radon map, all of the mid-Atlantic states – – Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, D.C., and Delaware – – have areas with elevated radon levels.

    For more information about radon contact our regional website at: http://www.epa.gov/reg3artd/Indoor/radon.htm or contact our national website at http://www.epa.gov/radon or call 1-800-SOS-RADON (767-7236).

    You can also reach your state radon office on-line or by phone at:

    Delaware Health and Social Services Administration at 302-739-4731
    Maryland calls go to EPA Region 3 at 215-814-2086
    Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection at 717-783-3594
    Virginia Radiological Health Programs at 804-786-5932
    Washington D.C. Department of Public Health at 202-535-2999
    West Virginia Radiological Health Program at 304-558-6716

    January is National Radon Action Month: http://www.epa.gov/radon/nram/public.html

    If you live in a single family home or an older ground floor condo please get your home tested! Contact your local state Radon contact to find out how to obtain inexpensive test kits or to find a local radon specialist.

    Why should I buy a LEED®certified home? What is LEED®?

    What is LEED®

    LEED® stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. It was created and is administered by the U.S. Green Building Council, a nonprofit environmental organization with more than 14,000 member organizations dedicated to sustainability in building design and construction. The certification system has been in use for more than seven years in commercial construction, and includes Green Home Buildingmore than 3.2 Billion square feet of real estate currently seeking LEED® certification.

    LEED® recognizes the highest quality in green homebuilding. LEED® promotes a whole-building approach to sustainability by recognizing performance in five key areas of human and environmental health: sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection, and indoor air quality.

    Please explore case studies on a variety of LEED®-certified homes at http://www.thegreenhomeguide.org.

     

    LEED®for Homes FAQs for Home Buyers

    Is a green home right for me?

    If you would like a healthier, more sustainable lifestyle for you and for your family, a green home is right for you. Green homes have lower utility bills, use less water, are associated with fewer asthma attacks, and are at lower risk for mold and mildew. Green homes are better for the environment, and they are affordable.

    How are green homes good for the climate?

    In the United States, our homes are responsible for 21% of our nation’s greenhouse gas emissions. Living in a green home means that you’re helping to stop the causes of climate change.

    How will a LEED®home benefit me?

    The benefits of a LEED®home include economic benefits such as lower energy and water bills; environmental benefits like reduced greenhouse gas emissions; and health benefits such as reduced exposure to mold, mildew and other indoor toxins.

    LEED®-certified homes may also be eligible for financial benefits such as lower fees for financing and lower insurance rates.

    How can I compare a green home to a conventional home?

    Think of LEED®as a nutrition label for your home that gives you much greater confidence in specific features of your home that will contribute to your quality of life.

    LEED®certified green homes include a homeowner’s manual and a LEED® “scorecard” that reflects third-party verified information about your home’s energy performance, water savings, materials used in construction, and other features.

    Similar, third-party verified information is typically not available for conventionally constructed homes.

    What types of homes are LEED®certified?

    The LEED®for Homes certification system is tailored for the construction of market rate and affordable new single family or low-rise multi-family homes (like condos and garden apartments). Existing homes undergoing extensive renovations – down to the last studs on at least one side of each exterior wall – are also eligible to participate in the program.Green Home Building

    What about remodeling projects?

    USGBC and the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) have partnered to create the REGREEN Program, which are the first nationwide green residential remodeling guidelines for existing homes.

     

    How can I purchase/build a LEED®home?

    Tell your realtor or builder that you want a LEED®-certified home. Some markets now include whether a home is LEED®certified in MLS listings of homes for sale. If you are interested in purchasing a LEED®certified home in Georgia, please contact me. I have a list of builders participating in the program.

    You can also visit http://www.thegreenhomeguide.org to find a homebuilder participating in the LEED®for Homes program in your area.

    Do LEED®certified homes cost more?

    LEED® certification can fit into your family’s budget regardless of what it is. LEED®certified homes include everything from luxury residences to Habitat for Humanity projects. Buying green and asking for LEED®-certification is your choice.

    Are there any incentives?

    Many local and state governments, utility companies and other entities across the country offer rebates, tax breaks and other incentives for green homes and for remodeling with green technologies.

    Where can I find more information on green home building?

    Visit http://www.thegreenhomeguide.org for comprehensive information and links to other great online resources.

    If you are interested purchasing a “green” home or remodeling “green” in Georgia, please contact me. As a certified EcoBroker®, I have received additional education to promote energy-efficient, sustainable, and healthier design/features in homes and buildings. If you are a Buyer, I look at your individual situation and help you find a home that is comfortable, affordable, healthy and saves money on utility bills. If you are a Seller, I will help you identify how you can improve your home’s water and energy efficiency to appeal to today’s buyer.

    Toilet Rebate Incentive Program in Madison, WI

    Source NBC15.com

    Press Release from the City of Madison:

    Madison–The Madison Water Utility has begun offering rebates of up to $100 as an incentive for residential customers to replace their older toilets with EPA WaterSense-labeled High Efficiency Toilet (HET) models. The program is part of the utility’s Water Conservation and Sustainability Plan to reduce per capita water usage 20 percent by the year 2020, with the goal of protecting the quality and quantity of the deep-well aquifer that supplies the Madison area.

    The Wisconsin Public Service Commission approved funding the rebate program through water rates, allocating $250,000 for $100 rebates to individual customers who replace older toilets. The EPA’s WaterSense program is part of that agency’s mission to protect drinking water resources, and it is similar in approach to Energy Star labeling for electric appliances.

    “Although this program is the first of its type in Wisconsin,” Water Utility General Manager Tom Heikkinen said, “many other jurisdictions throughout the U.S. have implemented similar conservation incentives. Toilets are the largest users of water in the home, so this is the logical place to encourage water efficiency.”

    Plan details:look for watersense label
    Toilets eligible for the rebate must be HETs (which use an average of 1.28 gallons per flush) and must be on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) WaterSense list. Any toilet that meets the criteria and is purchased after January 1, 2009, will be eligible.

    To apply for the rebate, customers must submit the original, dated sales receipt for the toilet showing the manufacturer’s model name and number and the completed application form–which can be found on the utility’s website http://www.madisonwater.org–or by stopping at the utility offices at 119 East Olin Avenue. Rebate checks will be mailed approximately 2 to 3 weeks after receipt of the application.

    Participants in the program must be residential customers of the Madison Water Utility, who live in single-family homes, condos, or apartments in buildings no larger than four units. Rebates are for replacement of existing larger-capacity toilets, and are not for new construction. Rebates are first-come, first-served until funding is exhausted, and are limited to one per household. Additional details can be found on the utility website or by calling the Madison Water Utility at 608:266-9129.

    Caroma manufactures High Efficiency Dual Flush toilets that qualify for the $100 rebate. To find out why these toilets are simply the best in my opinion, please view this YouTube video

    Another great video to see why these toilets don’t clog

    Caroma is an Australian company and the world leader in water conservation products for the bathroom. Since Australia is the second driest continent on the planet after Antarctica, its inhabitants were forced to get creative about water conservation in the bathroom. In 1984, after winning a grant from the Australian Government, Caroma set the standard in its industry by successfully introducing two button dual flush toilets.

    The strength ancaravelle-one-piece-side-viewd success of Caroma has been built on the foundations of innovation, water conservation and quality.

    Caroma manufactures a complete range of some of the most elegant and technologically advanced bathroom products in the world. Caroma is considered the world leader in dual flush technology and does not produce a single toilet line without this important technology.

    Today, the world is recognizing the necessity of resource conservation and looking to Caroma for answers.

    caroma_usa_inc_high_res

    To view the full product line available in the US, please visit http://www.caromausa.com